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Comment Editor's pick sustainability

What Saint Laurent’s Malibu show can teach us about the environmental impact of events

The recent staging of Saint Laurent’s spring/summer 2020 show in Malibu, California, violated multiple environmental regulations, leaving the local community up in arms, according to reports.

The event, which was denied a permit by the local government (instead enabled via a filming permit from a contractor), went against rules designed to protect the area’s fragile natural resources, writes Vogue Business. Included in that was the fact grunion, a type of fish, were expected to spawn on the sand that evening. Residents also said pieces of the set were left to wash out into the surf and the whole affair was rife with plastics, including plastic sandbags banned by the city. 

This raises questions about the impact such elaborate events, which often last for less than an hour, have on the environment, and the responsibility the industry should be taking to minimize their presence. By comparison, Stockholm Fashion Week was just cancelled in order to pursue more sustainable opportunities for its brands instead. 

Our Event Producer, Grace Collins, who also runs a business called Ten Four, is an expert in this space, increasingly working towards more sustainable solutions. So I called her up to find out exactly what’s going on and how brands can make better decisions with regards to the environment when planning their own occasions…

RA: Given your experience running events, what is the usual sort of waste that is produced from something like a fashion show, a conference or an activation?

GC: On average, the typical event attendee produces 1.89kg of waste per day, 85% of which can be non-recyclable, depending on where and what type of event it is. Food can comprise anywhere between 20-60% of this waste. This is outside of the waste produced by the organizers themselves which, in fact, can be huge.

A lot of the time events, fashion shows and experiential activations in particular, can involve a ‘build’ of some sort – this ‘build’ is usually a one-off, an experiential moment, or a photo op (for example) for guests, and is broken down and thrown out post event without any consideration for the materials used and how they should be correctly disposed of. These can include the likes of wood, plastic, steel – so many materials that if considered in advance and regulated by local authorities could and should be disposed of more appropriately – ideally recycled. 

RA: Are you seeing this change as the industry starts to consider sustainability and the environment more broadly? How?

GC: I have definitely noticed small changes here and there but whether we like to admit it or not, there is a level of ignorance toward the matter until it’s either enforced by authorities or in more severe circumstances, publicly ridiculed. The plus side of the recent Saint Laurent show in Malibu, is that it has now drawn attention to the impact that destination events can have on the environment and the fact there can be such a huge amount of waste created and left behind when these take place. 

The focus and pressure on the likes of these brands and corporate organizations to incorporate sustainable practices has a knock on effect for any event organizer. We need to understand and be more conscious of the footprint our one-off events are leaving on the environment.

A lot of corporate companies and brands alike are becoming more conscious of the impact their working environments and all things associated have on the environment. As event planners, it is our role and responsibility to reflect such sustainable conscience by making necessary changes to the events we produce on their behalf.

RA: What are the barriers or challenges surrounding this?

GC: Costs! A sustainable event strategy is something that can and should be considered and incorporated into every event management plan and event budget from initiation. However, it is quite often the costs that are associated with doing so that turn people off the idea of following through.

RA: What are you doing to help this change?

GC: I encourage my clients to think more sustainably when producing their events. I ask them to consider the likes of going paperless, talk them through the different options and ensure they feel confident in making these necessary changes. The bigger issue at hand – not to make life difficult for fellow planners but in an effort to make a positive change – is that many local governing bodies can be quite lenient when it comes to approving permits for events. 

Every event organizer has a responsibility to submit a waste management plan to their local council/governing body when applying to host an event, but only when hosting in a public space. Even in that case, the level of detail required is usually minimal and local councils do not hold a huge amount of responsibility over organizers or follow through with analyzing the damage that can be left behind on such occasions.

I’m working on a detailed waste management template and a list of suggested waste management suppliers/partners within my locality that can be shared with event agencies, and will hopefully go on to be accepted and monitored by local councils/governing bodies. These plans will need to be submitted and approved by councils’ in advance of any event taking place and then monitored to ensure companies are carrying out approved disposal plan properly.

RA: What are some easy solutions / things businesses could adapt to ensure less waste is produced or left behind from their events?

GC: There are a variety of different areas you can make effective changes in, from venues to catering and overall event production but in order to know where to begin, you need to reflect on and understand your impact. My tips for doing so, include: 

Develop a sustainability event strategy in the initial phases of your event plan, down to choosing a venue or location that is accessible by public transport (metro, buses, city bikes). If there are transfers required, I would suggest partnering with an electric car company, for example. If you can host your event and accommodation under the one roof – do! This will eliminate the requirement for transport.

  • Confirm whether or not your event venue recycles their waste. If they don’t have a system in place then start making a plan. Work with a local waste management company to dispose of planned materials on-site appropriately.
  • Look at previous event budgets to see if there were any areas whereby the quantity of product ordered was too high and ended up going to waste.
  • Use renewable energy sources. With advancements in technology there are many ways in which you can save on power to create a more sustainable event. Be conscious of what power you need and when you need it running. Options as simple as switching to LED lighting and lower power efficiency systems, although costly, will minimize your footprint – talk to your AV company about the options available.
  • Reduce print requirements, go paperless – think digital, incorporate an event app that allows guests to register and check-in without requiring a printed ticket or name badge. You can also make your event itinerary available to guests via this app/webpage, effectively communicating with them in real-time (which is of huge benefit to any event planner), and easily circulating new information/schedule changes. If you’re printing something for branding purposes, steer clear of including dates so that you can use again at future events.
  • Sustainable catering – ask your caterer if they can supply reusable, compostable or recyclable dinnerware? Do they have a food waste reduction strategy in place? Get an accurate guest count and finalize the amount of food needed in advance of the event so that you are reducing the potential waste. Donate leftover food to a nearby shelter. Help longterm by beginning to track typical food consumption patterns at your events.
  • Make it as easy as possible for your attendees to recycle and maintain the venue while still enjoying the event, simply by ensuring you place plenty of recycling stations throughout the venue.

Sustainable practices may not come naturally to everyone. Be patient, take baby steps, practice makes perfect, and every little counts in my eyes.

Categories
business digital snippets product Retail sustainability technology

ICYMI: Rent the Runway’s competitive lawsuit, Cavalli exits US, the data gap for fashion sustainability

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Inside Rent the Runway’s alleged “scheme of monopolistic, anti-competitive conduct” [The Fashion Law]
  • The struggling fashion house Roberto Cavalli closes its U.S. stores [NYT]
  • Exactly how bad is fashion for the planet? We still don’t know for sure [BoF]
TECHNOLOGY
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Sustainability becoming an economic benefit for luxury brands [Fashion Network]
  • Hundreds of US cities are killing or scaling back their recycling programs [Vox]
  • Corona builds plastic trash wall on Ipanema Beach to warn from plastic pollution [PR Week]
  • Asda’s George to only use recycled polyester by 2025 [Drapers]
  • The North Face aims to reduce man-made waste in collaboration with RÆBURN [Complex]
  • The next wave of sustainable fashion is all about regenerative farming [Fashionista]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • At Galeries Lafayette’s new Champs Élysées flagship, the Paris concept store is reborn [Vogue]
  • Tommy Hilfiger closes NYC flagship and more [Fashion United]
  • Dior expands beach collection with dedicated dioriviera spaces [WWD]
PRODUCT
  • Gentle Monster and Huawei team up to launch fashion-focused smart glasses [The Current Daily]
  • Lululemon soars on menswear, online push; inches into Nike turf [Reuters]
  • Reformation is launching its permanent extended sizing clothing collection [Fashionista]
  • Bobbi Brown and Walmart want to bring wellness to the masses [BoF]
  • Luxury marijuana brand Beboe is launching a skincare label [Paper Mag]
  • Amazon now wants to get into your make-up bag with their own skincare brand [Vogue]
BUSINESS
  • Farfetch invests in The Modist [Drapers]
  • Michael Kors steps back from Capri board [WWD]
  • PVH in talks to sell Calvin Klein women’s jeans business [Retail Dive]
  • Carine Roitfeld announced as style advisor of Karl Lagerfeld’s namesake brand [Harpers Bazaar]
  • Neiman Marcus drums up support for refinancing [WWD]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Jo Malone London is launching a new fragrance exhibition [Harpers Bazaar]
  • Dove debuts #ShowUs image library to diversify depictions of women in media [Marketing Dive]
  • YSL Beauty hits the desert for debut Coachella pop-up [WWD]
  • Fashion designer Simon Porte Jacquemus is opening a café in Paris and it’s an Instagrammer’s dream [The Independent]
CULTURE
  • The future of luxury is freedom [BoF]
  • Shopping while Chinese: Real stories of discrimination [Jing Daily]
  • Ikea’s next big thing is self-care [Fast Company]
  • Generation Z: Who they are, in their own words [NYT]
  • Why does the burden of creating inclusivity in fashion fall largely on marginalized groups? [Fashionista]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
social media

Hedi Slimane’s Twitter rant on all things (Yves) Saint Laurent

Saint laurent YSL Hedi Slimane logo twitter rant
The YSL logo used during Hedi Slimane’s tenure at the brand

Hedi Slimane took to Twitter yesterday for a 22-post rant about his use of the YSL logo while in place at Saint Laurent, which he famously (and controversially) rebranded from Yves Saint Laurent during his tenure as creative director.

“FACT CHECKING / THERE HAVE BEEN INACCURATE STATEMENTS ON RECENT ARTICLES REGARDING HEDI AND THE USAGE OF THE YSL HISTORICAL LOGO,” he began, in all capitals. “FOR THE RECORD, THE USAGE OF THE CASSANDRE LOGO WAS ENTIRELY PART OF HEDI’S REFORM PROJECT FOR THE HOUSE FROM THE EARLY DAYS OF 2012 TO 2016.”

The tirade goes on to demonstrate all of the occasions he did indeed use the YSL logo throughout, including in store design, accessories, ad campaigns, fashion shows and more. “IN CONCLUSION, IT IS ACCURATE TO SAY THAT THE YSL ICONIC INITIALS WERE IN FACT CELEBRATED AND CHAMPIONED BY HEDI,” it ends.

So why the sudden rant?

As pointed out by Fashionista, this is the first time Slimane has returned to Twitter since closing his account down in 2012 following an open letter calling fashion critic Cathy Horyn a “schoolyard bully”.

This season she wrote a review of Anthony Vaccarello’s first collection for the brand, stating: “Apparently, Vaccarello has restored the Y, which had been excised by his predecessor, Hedi Slimane, as both a throwback to the brand’s original name and an attempt to modernize it. (The truth is, despite Slimane’s efforts, most people still say YSL.)”

The assumption is Slimane is reigniting the feud between the duo. WWD also notes it comes following reports he is seeking additional funds from former employer Kering, owner of Saint Laurent, to the tune of $2.2 million. A French commercial court previously ordered the company to pay him$13 million. He is also now reportedly looking for Kering to apply a partnership agreement giving him certain rights as a minority shareholder in the brand.

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups technology

What you missed: Snapchat’s spectacles, driving see-now buy-now sales, Cartier’s sponsored content

Snapchat spectacles
Snapchat spectacles

It might have been Milan Fashion Week, but the majority of musing worth knowing about in the digital space this past week surrounds the launch of Snapchat’s (now Snap Inc’s) new camera glasses. On top of that has been everything from whether see-now, buy-now fashion week shows are actually driving sales, the fact McQueen and Chanel top a new CoolBrands list, and why LVMH’s digital drive is taking time despite its big Apple hire. Read on for a breakdown of everything you need to know…


TOP STORIES
  • Why Snapchat’s spectacles can succeed where Google Glass failed [AdAge]
  • Are ‘see now, buy now’ shows driving sales? [BoF]
  • Neiman Marcus is encouraging brands to adopt ‘see-now, buy-now’ strategy [Fashionista]
  • Alexander McQueen and Chanel make top 20 global CoolBrands list [The Industry]
  • Inside Cartier’s sponsored content strategy [Glossy]

BUSINESS
  • LVMH’s digital drive takes time despite Apple hire [Reuters]
  • Adidas and Under Armour are challenging Nike like never before [Business Insider]
  • Tiffany proposes growth through engagement in the digital age [BrandChannel]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • YSL Beauté reveals first ever UK Snapchat lens [The Industry]
  • Adidas claims retention on Snapchat is ‘insane’ compared to YouTube [The Drum]
  • Teens talk Instagram beauty influencers and what makes them buy [Racked]
  • Here’s how much engagement brands got from back-to-school social posts [AdWeek]
  • Google launches messaging app with chatbot [Campaign]
  • Branded emojis coming to messaging apps [WSJ]

MARKETING
  • Gap teams up with Mr Black to raise awareness for denim care [Fashion United]
  • Bobbi Brown initiates mobile makeovers with Uber [WWD]

RETAIL
  • How designer Rebecca Minkoff uses technology to create a better shopping experience [The Street]
  • BHS to launch online a month after last store closed [Guardian]
  • Zara fashions an expanded online growth strategy [BrandChannel]

TECHNOLOGY
  • The secret lab where Nike invented the power-lacing shoe of our dreams [Wired]
  • No. 21 Sends shoes that glow in the dark down the Milan Fashion Week runway [Footwear News]

START-UPS
  • Carmen Busquets, fashion e-commerce’s fairy godmother [NY Times]
  • Where is the Uber of fashion? [Forbes]
Categories
Editor's pick social media

Saint Laurent wiped its Instagram history and fans aren’t happy

YSL_anthonyvaccarello_instagram

It’s goodbye Hedi Slimane and hello Anthony Vaccarello quite literally on Instagram where Saint Laurent has wiped all of its previous posts on the @YSL account and replaced them with a single portrait of its incoming creative director Vaccarello.

The move comes after the announcement on Monday he would be taking over the reins from Slimane at the storied house, leaving his role at Versus Versace in order to do so. Slimane had been in place for four years at Saint Laurent until that point.

The desire for a clean slate is not a surprising one – providing Vaccarello with the chance (if on Instagram alone) to start afresh with his vision for the brand.

Such erasing of history hasn’t been met kindly by fans however. Comments on the now single image, include: “Why delete Hedi Slimane’s work? Wtf”, “You deleted everything from Hedi’s tenure !! Bye b*tches”, “I found this very disrespectful towards Hedi’s work”, and: “That’s cute about Anthony but why take down Hedi’s photos? Hedi’s DNA will no [doubt] be continued. No issue with a new creative director but why erase the past 4 years?”

Many of the other comments show fans both disgruntled and hopeful about the changes. “We weren’t [buying] Saint Laurent, we were buying Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane…no more Hedi Slimane…no more Saint Laurent! I’m sure they’ll lose a lot in revenue from 2017…another Pilati unselling era ahead!” reads one.

Another by comparison: “Vaccarrello for YSL makes sense to me. He reminds me so much of an early 90s Tom Ford. I have been observing Anthony’s work on Versus and under his namesake brand.. a fresh modernist approach is what this maison needs rn. Someone who can bring some sharp sex appeal and sophistication back. I’m sure he’ll do magic and will be a great fit. Meanwhile, Hedi with his punk rock + grunge vibes was tiresome af. I wish all the best for his career though.”

YSL has over 386,000 fans on Instagram. It seems no noticeable changes have otherwise been made on Twitter or Facebook.

Categories
Blocks Comment technology

YSL Beauté launches Google Glass tutorials in Selfridges, WiFi issues impact experience

ysl_googleglass2

Yves Saint Laurent Beauté launched Google Glass make-up tutorials in its consignment at Selfridges department store in London last week. First offered at Bloomingdales in New York in September, these consultations have sparked quite a bit of press excitement. They’ve accordingly been a great way for the brand to pull in new customers, but the execution appears to be a little patchy.

The tutorials need to be booked in advance and take 45 minutes. The experience is similar to any other make-up consultation: the artist applies the beauty products to one half of the face, shows the customer the results in a mirror, and then applies make-up to the other half of the face, all-the-while explaining what they are doing and why.

What makes a Google Glass tutorial enticing is that the device records the entire procedure. After the makeover is completed, customers are sent a video of it via email, including before/after shots and a list of the products used. The video can be played back at any time, serving as a tutorial for how to apply the make-up in the future.

The advantages of this for YSL are plentiful. Aside from growing its email database, it allows the company to gather data on which items are most suited to the customer demographic at Selfridges, and which items receive the most post-consultation attention. It could likely also inform future customised product recommendations.

ysl_googleglass1

According to a make-up artist at the Selfridges YSL counter, the service is in demand and customers have been scheduling in appointments. There’s just one problem: the WiFi connection has been playing up, making it difficult and sometimes impossible to email the videos within the promised 20-minute timeframe after a consultation.

It’s a common issue: innovative ideas are challenging to execute, especially when they involve the introduction of new technology. Often, it comes down to difficulties in the technology on-boarding process. The existing systems in place may not be sophisticated enough to carry or support the technology. And without the follow-up video, the Google Glass consultation is no different to any other make-up consultation. And being promised a video within 20 minutes and not receiving it until at least a few hours later can lead to quite an amount of frustration for the consumer.

While this fixture may incentivise customers to book their make-up consultancy at YSL instead of at a different brand in the famous department store this season, it seems likely that the excitement around it will subside. It might prove to be a case of “been there, done that”. Either way, it’s a fun way for shoppers to get their party-face on, and it showcases YSL in a more innovative light than many of its competitors, or indeed that’s been seen before.

Images via fashion.telegraph.co.uk

Categories
digital snippets social media

Digital snippets: Nordstrom, Apple, YSL, Instagram, Tesco, Forever 21, Cartier

Here’s a highlight of stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

Pinterest-nordstrom2

  • Nordstrom adds Pinterest logo to products in-store as social proof for potential buyers (as pictured) [Gigaom]
  • Apple poaches Yves Saint Laurent CEO to work on ‘special projects’ [Mashable]
  • Fashion shows increasingly come with perfectly staged Instagram moments [BoF]
  • Tesco aims to be first supermarket to introduce 3D printing in-store [PSFK]
  • Forever 21 pushes instant outfit inspiration with new social platform, 21st Street  [MTV Style]
  • Cartier releases seven short films for seven rings [Fashionotes]
  • Why Eva Chen is the first editor-in-chief of our generation [Fashionista]
  • 12 digital technologies retailers are investing in [Mashable]
  • “Sale” proves more powerful than “save” in subject lines of emails [Econsultancy]
Categories
digital snippets social media Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Wonderbra, Gucci, Mulberry, L’Oréal, Saint Laurent, Louis Vuitton

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Wonderbra launches augmented reality-enhanced “Decoder” campaign (as above) [DigitalBuzzBlog]
  • Gucci unveils pinnable banner ad [Mashable]
  • Mulberry launches Brilliant Britain online guide [Vogue UK]
  • Hedi Slimane’s Saint Laurent rebranding continues with YSL website overhaul [Grazia]
  • Louis Vuitton takes to Instagram during Paris Fashion Week [WWD]
  • L’Wren Scott went with Instagram in lieu of a fashion show [TheCut]
  • L’Oréal launches beauty and style app for the Xbox [AdAge]
  • Refinery29 and DKNY team up for handbag line [Refinery29]
Categories
digital snippets Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Dior, YSL, Ralph Lauren, Zara, Lyst

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Backstage Dior video shows one million flowers being installed at couture show (as above) [Fashionista]
  • Ralph Lauren organises Facebook send-off for Olympic athletes [Mashable]
  • Social commerce platform Lyst secures $5m funding [TheNextWeb]
  • KCD and Spring form partnership for global fashion communications, will help brands navigate complex new media landscape [WWD]
  • Designer uses Photoshop and textile software program to knit medical images into high fashion [The Atlantic]