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Fendi enlists six artists to makeover HQ rooftop

The Ring of the Future, Fendi
The Ring of the Future, Fendi

Fendi has enlisted six global street artists to transform its HQ rooftop in Rome, Italy, in celebration of the one year anniversary of its “F is For…” online communications platform aimed at millennials.

Artists hailing from the US to Korea got together to write the word “Future” in their own native language, creating a ring that represents inclusion and diversity, titled The Ring of the Future.

To celebrate the launch, Fendi has also launched its first “F is For…” product, a genderless t-shirt sold exclusively at its online store.

The “F is For…” hub can be accessed via Fendi.com, with content split into five different verticals: Freaks, explaining the platform’s vision; Fulgore, featuring fashion editorials shot entirely on the iPhone 7; Faces, introducing models and other members of the brand’s ‘young crew’; Freedom, listing places to eat, drink and have fun; and Fearless, introducing new art and music.

In the physical world, “F is For…” is also hosting events, parties and fashion shows, while hoping to establish Rome, its hometown, as a fashionable location.

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Editor's pick product Startups technology

Why the next big streetwear brand could be a wearable tech one

TwentyFour15
TwentyFour15

The biggest observation from Benjamin Males, CEO and co-founder of new fashion and technology brand TwentyFour15, which launched at London Fashion Week this past weekend, is that no one asked how it worked.

“It was a room full of Gen Z consumers, and they all just accepted it existed,” he explains. “This new generation don’t see sci-fi as sci-fi, they see it as a prototype for the future. This consumer we’re going after – they’re not technologically insecure, and the launch proved that – they’ve grown up in a world with ubiquitous internet and smart devices; they have this tech in their DNA.”

TwentyFour15 is a line of app-connected, fibre optic, colour-changing apparel. Males refers to is as a “fashion brand for the digital generation with technology in its DNA”, but what it’s also about is wearable tech moving beyond fitness devices and into popular culture by way of a youth-focused streetwear brand.

In a literal sense, that means t-shirts, a backpack and a bomber jacket (to start with) that are connected via bluetooth to an app that controls the LED lights otherwise embedded in them. Initially, the functionality is kept simple – there’s a colour wheel to shift the shade of the lights and a music feature that lets the user sync them so they also animate to the beat.

The potential longer-term, however, is much wider. The key here is that TwentyFour15 is powered by XO, the agency behind well-known wearable technology feats of the past including Lady Gaga’s flying dress and Richard Nicoll’s light-up Tinkerbell dress.

Head over to Forbes to read more about exactly what this new brand is hoping to achieve and how its streetwear approach is in line with a Silicon Valley hardware company.

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business e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Generation Z: 10 stats from SXSW you need to know

kylie

At SXSW Interactive this past week, conversation wasn’t just about big flashy new technologies – from VR headsets at numerous event pop-ups, to all sorts of conversations around artificial intelligence or autonomous cars. It was also about consumers and how to better reach them.

As the festival has drawn in more marketers and not just tech folk over the years, this has increasingly become the case. For 2016, however, it was one segment very specifically that stood out: Generation Z.

Defined as those born after the year 1995, or thereabouts, this is the generation that follows Millennials. It’s also the generation that’s still being born right now. For those in their teen years however, there are many healthy insights already to gain. Head over to Forbes to gain access to the top 10 stats and facts shared during SXSW.

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Editor's pick technology

IN PICTURES: Macy’s new “One Below” juniors floor – a tech-infused playground

Macys_Onebelow_tech8

Macy’s has opened a new juniors floor on the lower level of its flagship Herald Square location in New York City, with numerous tech features including a selfie wall and Levi’s customisation station installed.

Called One Below, the 53,000 square-foot space is part of a $400m renovation of the store. It features young brands such as Material Girl and XOXO, and a wealth of interactive experiences to engage with today’s young consumers.

The selfie wall allows users to pose against famous Macy’s backdrops; the Levi’s custom laser bar let’s them choose designs from a book to appear on their jeans; a wearable tech area dedicated to smart watches includes brands like Fitbit, Samsung and Fossil; and another from 3D systems sees 3D-printed products including jewellery and phone cases for sale.

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A blow dry bar is also coming to the beauty department soon, and there are screens in every department, including a giant one outside the fitting room showing what looks like Instagram posts across it. All the seats for those waiting also have charging stations for devices.

The floor is reportedly aimed at Millennials (those born circa 1980-2000), but it already feels younger than that – for today’s pre-teens and teens (if the prom and homecoming dresses are anything to go by) and their increasingly connected futures.

More importantly, it’s also heavily for today’s teen tourists: it’s no mistake the selfie wall appears in the Macy’s Arcade for instance, which also houses the department store’s souvenir products. This is for visitors, not regular shoppers; it’s intentionally gimmicky, but that’s why it works.

Here are a load more original pictures of the space:

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