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e-commerce Retail social media

Instagram launches seamless checkout with Burberry, Zara and more

Instagram has announced a new shopping feature that allows customers to complete their purchases without ever having to leave the app. Launch partners include fashion brands such as Burberry, Zara and H&M.

The feature, called Instagram Checkout, allows customers to check out on product purchases with one click, without having to leave the app. Previously, clicking the shopping tag on posts led users to an external e-commerce page. The customer journey is now entirely seamless: users only needing to pre-register their payment and delivery details the first time they use it, and can purchase with one click from then on. Users will also receive push notifications from Instagram on their orders, such as when it has been shipped.

The feature is currently only available in the US through 20 participating brands, which also includes Revolve, MAC Cosmetics and Oscar de la Renta.

Speaking on the launch, Rachel Waller, VP of marketing, digital at Burberry said: “Burberry is always pushing for digital innovation that improves our customers’ experience. We have seen great results from the monthly B Series product drops which launched last September, bridging the journey from inspiration to e-commerce for our social community for the first time,” adding, “We are excited to expand our social commerce as one of the first brands to adopt checkout on Instagram”

Instagram shopping feature Checkout Instagram

Posting on Instagram Stories on Tuesday (March 19), the platform’s head of fashion partnerships, Eva Chen, gave her followers a sneak peak of other brands who will be joining in the upcoming weeks, including Dior, Prada, Uniqlo and Kylie Cosmetics.

Instagram has continuously improved its shopping features in order to align with consumer demand for more frictionless social shopping. Last September, it also announced shopping capabilities on its Stories and Explore features.

How are you thinking about e-commerce innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners for your innovation strategy. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology, powered by a network of top startups. Get in touch to learn more.


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e-commerce Podcast Startups technology

Warby Parker on why technology is the lynchpin to customer service

Technology can enable us to do great things, says Warby Parker co-founder and CEO, Neil Blumenthal, with regards to the brand’s meteoric rise in the direct-to-consumer space, on the latest episode of the Innovators podcast by the Current Global.

Speaking to Liz Bacelar at this year’s NRF Big Show in New York, Blumenthal explains how technology is critical to making customers’ lives easier.

Listen here: Apple Podcasts | Android Google Podcasts | Stitcher | RSS

Warby Parker sees itself sitting at the intersection of three communities – tech, fashion, and social enterprise, he notes. It’s both a tech company and a retailer focused on creating products and services that tangibly impact consumers every day.

Warby Parker is one of Silicon Valley’s first so-called unicorns, a special group of startups that exceed expectations to pioneer within their own category by hitting over $1bn in valuation – including Airbnb, Uber and WeWork.

The nine-year-old company has paved the way to creating a great retail experience that transverses seamlessly between online and offline, and as a result, inspired the business model of many single-product focused startups known to consumers today – from suitcases at Away,  to footwear at Allbirds.

But from its scrappy beginnings hosting a showroom at Blumenthal’s New York apartment, to being one of the first DTC brands to launch a brick-and-mortar retail space, the eyewear company has had a razor sharp focus on treating the whole experience of buying glasses as a single product – from trial to wear.

From its successful at-home trial program to digital eye tests, Warby Parker works with a team of in-house technologists to constantly iterate its approach to better serving the customer. For example, after receiving feedback that it was inconvenient for customers to take time off work to get an eye exam, it developed a prescription app that pairs an iPhone to a second screen to test the user’s vision. Recently, it then deployed Apple’s new AR technology to launch a virtual try-on feature.

During this conversation, Blumenthal also shares how the brand has been built to resonate with multiple consumer segments, the importance of the social aspect of the company, and why he sees Amazon more as inspiration, rather than threat.

Liz Bacelar and Neil Blumenthal Warby Parker
Liz Bacelar and Neil Blumenthal

Catch up with all of our episodes of the Innovators podcast by the Current Global here. The series is a weekly conversation with visionaries, executives and entrepreneurs. It’s backed by the Current Global, a consultancy transforming how consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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business Campaigns digital snippets product Retail sustainability technology

ICYMI: Apple’s Angela Ahrendts on retail, the UK MP report on sustainability, surveillance for service

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Retail is broken. Apple’s Angela Ahrendts has a plan [Vogue Business]
  • What we’ve learned from MPs’ interim report on the sustainability of the UK fashion industry [The Industry]
  • Is surveillance the future of service? [BoF]
  • Puma unveils a self-lacing shoe [Retail Dive]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Lancôme partners with Alibaba on AR game [Retail Dive]
  • Warby Parker’s new app combines AR and face mapping so you can try on virtual glasses [The Verge]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Is the beauty industry doing enough to tackle plastic pollution? [The Independent]
  • Paris aims to be ‘Sustainable Capital of Fashion’ by 2024 [WWD]
  • Farfetch to drop fur from collections [Fashion United]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Why fashion brands are launching podcasts [BoF]
  • Sweaty Betty launches empowerment campaign alongside new manifesto [Fashion Network]
  • American Eagle hands creative control to Gen Zers for spring campaign [Marketing Dive]
PRODUCT
  • “Athleisure makeup” is mostly marketing, but if you like working out in lipstick, go for it [Quartzy]
  • Justin Bieber just launched a new clothing line called Drew [Fashionista]
  • Glossier becomes the latest beauty brand to diversify its shade range [Fashion Network]
  • Stella McCartney redefines sustainable eyewear with new collection [Fashion Network]
BUSINESS
  • Gerry Weber International files for insolvency [Fashion Network]
  • Why are Chinese tourists shopping less? [Jing Daily]
  • Moncler says ‘Genius’ strategy worked [BoF]
CULTURE
  • Fashionista’s new survey suggests that bullying is still alive and well in the fashion industry [Fashionista]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Macy’s buys Story, Gucci’s new flagship, AI and the future of fashion

Futuristic fashion by Tim Walker
Futuristic fashion by Tim Walker

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Macy’s buys Story concept [RetailDive]
  • Gucci plants its flag in Soho [BoF]
  • How artificial intelligence will impact the future of fashion [Vogue]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Can AI and AR turn your prospects into customers? [Inc]
  • How beauty brands like Coty and Shiseido are using voice assistants [Glossy]
  • Ticketmaster to trial facial recognition technology at live venues [Venture]
  • Verisart brings blockchain certification to the global art auction market [TechCrunch]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • Fast fashion goes green with mushrooms, lumber scraps, and algae [Bloomberg]
  • Applied DNA Sciences confirms traceability of leather [WWD]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Walmart.com redesigns as the anti-Amazon [Co.Design]
  • Farfetch partners with Stadium Goods on sneaker hub [WWD]
  • Brandless’ pop-up is focused on community engagement rather than selling products [AdWeek]
  • China’s live-streaming fashion boom changing the way Gen Z shops [SCMP]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Inside the bitter war to bring Tupac and Michael Jackson back to life [Wired]
  • Diet Prada unmasked [BoF]
  • Instagram quietly launches payments for commerce [TechCrunch]
PRODUCT
  • Amsterdam is solving its gum litter problem by making shoes out of recycled gum [AdWeek]
  • ElektroCouture: Inside the fashion house behind Swarovski’s $60,000 light-up dress [Forbes]
BUSINESS
  • Over 400 startups are trying to become the next Warby Parker. Inside the wild race to overthrow every consumer category [Inc]
  • Prada: Making the most of its moment [BoF]
  • Alibaba’s anti-counterfeit group now has 105 brand members, including L’Oréal and Bose [TheDrum]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce product Retail technology

ICYMI: The resale market grows, reporting gender pay gaps, augmented reality at retail

Thredup - resale
Thredup

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Resale is expected to be bigger than fast fashion within 10 years [Fashionista]
  • Major fashion names among worst offenders in Britain gender pay gap [NYTimes]
  • 10 retailers leading the way in augmented reality [RetailDive]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Retailers race against Amazon to automate stores [NYTimes]
  • Will brands start selling digital apparel in video games? [LSN Global]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Tencent shows off their vision for the future of retail [JingDaily]
  • Why Sephora merged its digital and physical retail teams into one department [Digiday]
  • How Men’s Wearhouse became a bright spot in the declining retail space [AdWeek]
  • Could entering a lottery be the future of shopping? End Clothing thinks so [Vogue]
  • These 25 companies are revolutionizing retail [Business Insider]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Ssense shuts down Polyvore, sparking outrage among fans [BoF]
  • Tommy Hilfiger’s new campaign features models with disabilities [Teen Vogue]
  • The day Warby Parker lost its cool [FastCompany]
PRODUCT
  • Counterfeiting makeup is a new trend in Chinese how-to videos [JingDaily]
  • Louis Vuitton now sells a pricey tracker for your designer luggage [Engadget]
BUSINESS
  • Why Virgil at Vuitton only begins to combat industry racism [HypeBeast]
  • Comme des Garçons is launching a direct-to-consumer brand [GQ]
  • How Zegna caters to today’s novelty-obsessed Chinese consumers [JingDaily]
Categories
Editor's pick Events technology

Sitting at the edge of culture: How SXSW has moved from tech to brand playground

Viceland's baby goats at SXSW
Viceland’s baby goats at SXSW

How do we know when we have hit peak SXSW? Was it the year grumpy cat stole all the headlines? Was it the hotel-sized vending machine from Doritos? Was it when homeless people were rather uncouthly set up as wifi transmitters?

Or will we look back and think about when baby goats grabbed our attention in 2018? With a solid dose of irony, Viceland went above and beyond to get people to pay its parking lot spot a visit this year, with a pit full of real-life “kids” available for petting. How else are you going to spend your time in between hopping from keynote sessions to tacos and barbecue. after all?

Jokes aside, that move represents quite a significant shift that’s happened over the past five-plus years at the Austin-based festival. At one point the Interactive portion of the show, which precedes Music and runs alongside Film, was really about new tech launches – the place to discover the latest startups, and the big event for the likes of Twitter, Foursquare and beyond to get off the ground.

Where once it was really a haven for geeks, and a playground for all things B2B, slowly but steadily it has shifted to become more and more about marketing, and then carried through to be a representation really of broader culture and society.

Let’s not forget how much more pervasive the internet has become in our lives during that time. SXSW Interactive is really about everything cultural because tech infiltrates that in every single way today. In doing so, the festival has therefore simultaneously ended up being phenomenally consumer-facing.

2018 is the perfect culmination of that evolution. On the one hand, the big speakers on stage this year are discussing everything from female empowerment, diversity and transparency, while out and about around the city there’s a mass takeover by fashion brands, not to mention the most impressive activation from entertainment entity Westworld, that has ever been seen at SXSW.

TheCurrent's founder, Liz Bacelar, "wanted" at the Westworld SXSW experience
TheCurrent’s founder, Liz Bacelar, “wanted” at the Westworld SXSW experience

The audience mark-up of the event is inevitably behind this shift as well, with that focus on culture driving it. No longer is it just comprised of developers or startup entrepreneurs, but rather a perfect slice of the typical “millennial” target consumer. Is it fully representative of America? Perhaps not. But there is certainly diversity on the ground in many more ways than you would have imagined from a tech conference, and than you would have seen 5-10 years ago.

The big consumer-facing activations used to arrive only for music. Doing them during Interactive isn’t entirely new – Nike, Levi’s, Game of Thrones, even Warby Parker have had a presence in previous years – but 2018 stands out for its pervasiveness.

In terms of hype, the big activation is Westworld, as mentioned. Today, there are people lining up for hours to get a secret shuttle out to Live Without Limits, where HBO has built a replica of the fictional town of Sweetwater to kick off marketing activity around the show’s second season.

Under Armour's Hovr activation at SXSW (Image via AdWeek)
Under Armour’s Hovr activation at SXSW (Image via AdWeek)

Back in downtown, meanwhile, technology isn’t entirely missing from the experiences put together, but a lot of it is on consumer tech for today, rather than tomorrow. Highlights include the Google Assistant house touting the future of voice tech on the one hand, and Under Armour’s push for its latest cushioning technology, Hovr, on the other. The latter was teased as a zero gravity experience, but turned out to be a group of trampolines to take photos on, proving the value of Instagram-worthiness remains (with long lines out the door to back it).

The move to represent the technical ability in product, has also been the case for L’Oréal this week with the launch of its Custom D.O.S.E. skincare line – a technological service that can scan and evaluate an individual consumer’s skin and create tailor made serums as a result.

And tech is a consideration for Outdoor Voices too, with the launch of an augmented reality campaign that encourages SXSW attendees and locals to get outdoors into a park to get access to exclusive product. In addition, Bose has also been thinking about AR, but this time demonstrating a pair of smart glasses that use audio rather than visuals as the overlaid digital information. The result is that you can hear what you see – when you look at a building for instance, it tells you what it is in your ear.

Our friend @jennifer outside the Hermèsmatic store in Austin for SXSW
Our friend @jennifer outside the Hermèsmatic store in Austin for SXSW

Some of the other experiences meanwhile are more traditional in their programming. A line-up of talks, a store and a DJ for happy hour does the job for fashion brand Express, for instance, while the Create & Cultivate pop-up, which is focused on “women to watch” and backed by watch brand Fossil, is not dissimilar.

Laying on top of all that is also some truly lo-fi consumer focus. Wrangler has teamed up with Modcloth to offer denim customization in the latter’s store, for instance. Meanwhile, Hermès is probably the most surprising attendee. The luxury brand has brought Hermèsmatic – a laundromat-inspired customization and repair service – to this year’s festival to offer fans the chance to update their vintage scarves via washing and dip-dying services.

SXSW may not be the place to discover the latest big tech before anyone else anymore, but it is certainly somewhere to come for a jump into how modern culture is evolving at the hands of our connected era, and inspiration around the kind of brand activations targeting tuned-in millennials accordingly.

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce film mobile product social media sustainability technology

What you missed: Warby Parker’s face mapping, Black Friday plans, Amazon Go is ready to go

Warby Parker's face mapping
Warby Parker’s face mapping

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past week.


TOP STORIES
  • Warby Parker’s app is cleverly using the iPhone X’s face mapping to recommend glasses [TheVerge]
  • Why REI and Modcloth will close on Black Friday, and prosper [RetailDive]
  • Amazon’s cashierless store is almost ready for prime time [Bloomberg]
  • The industry remembers Azzedine Alaïa [BoF]
  • Tech titans José Neves and Ian Rogers on the future of luxury fashion [Evening Standard]

BUSINESS
  • Shoppers expected to spend £10bn during Black Friday bonanza [TheIndustry]
  • Stitch Fix’s highly anticipated IPO was ¯_(?)_/¯ [QZ]
  • Farfetch losses grow despite skyrocketing revenue [Retail Gazette]
  • Will the year of ‘the drop’ change fashion forever? [Fashionista]
  • Is the second wave of sustainability finally here? [Refinery29]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Inside Snapchat’s battle to win back its momentum [BoF]

MARKETING
  • Australian department store tells the sweet Christmas tale of an expat gingerbread man [AdWeek]
  • Keira Knightley sings in French for Chanel Coco Crush campaign [The Impression]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Amazon’s last mile [Gizmodo]
  • Amazon could be worth $1 trillion in 2018 [RetailDive]
  • Spotify expands merch to beauty products [TechCrunch]
  • Rituals is overhauling its app to compete with the likes of Amazon, but it’s treading carefully [TheDrum]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Alibaba’s AI fashion consultant helps achieve record-setting sales [MIT Technology Review]
  • Poshmark builds a styling tool for Amazon’s Alexa powered devices [Internet Retailer]
  • How brands and start-ups are using AI to help you get dressed [Fashionista]
  • Vogue US partners with Apple on augmented reality feature [BoF]

PRODUCT
  • Fashion’s interest in alternative fabrics keeps growing [NY Times]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce film product social media Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: overhauled trade deals, Shulman steps down from Vogue, automation in fashion

Iris van Herpen's SS17 couture show / what you missed - overhauled trade deals, Shulman steps down from Vogue, automation in fashion
Iris van Herpen’s SS17 couture show

Donald Trump’s first week as President has been quite something… for this industry, it’s the overhaul on trade deals particularly to keep an eye on, as outlined by Bloomberg below. Elsewhere, the past seven days have been all about British Vogue editor Alexandra Shulman stepping down, through to lots more in the way of technical detail from the couture shows in Paris.

Also worth reading is the BoF’s piece on automation, a view on what the store of the future looks like now we have Amazon Go, and the unveiling of the first dress made with graphene.


TOP STORIES
  • Nike and Ford caught in crossfire of Trump’s trade overhaul [Bloomberg]
  • British Vogue editor Alexandra Shulman steps down [Vogue]
  • How automation is reshaping fashion [BoF]
  • Iris van Herpen uses visual trickery for latest couture collection [Dezeen]
  • How the retail industry can prepare for the Fourth Industrial Revolution [Medium]

BUSINESS
  • As Trump pushes for U.S. manufacturing, ‘Made in America’ is losing its lustre in the fashion world [LA Times]
  • Warby Parker to open 25 stores this year, co-CEO says [WSJ]
  • Why Macy’s is closing even profitable stores [Fool]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • How 5 UK brands are using Instagram Stories [Digiday]
  • Dior serialises Bella Hadid-fronted beauty content to retain youth interest [Luxury Daily]

MARKETING
  • H&M launches latest recycling campaign with Bring It On film [The Industry]
  • New Balance aims for inspiration with time capsule initiative [Retail Dive]
  • Cosmopolitan launches influencer network with River Island as first client [Campaign]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • What does the store of the future look like now we have Amazon Go? [Guardian]
  • The demise of the department store experience [AdAge]
  • Shoppers now expect personalisation to extend to the store: study [Internet Retailing]
  • Get closer to the single customer view – by connecting online and offline data [The Drum]
  • E-commerce: Next day delivery is the “new norm” [The Industry]
  • Amazon puts virtual Dash buttons on its homepage [Techcrunch]

TECHNOLOGY
  • CFDA collaborates with Accenture on tech integration initiative [WWD]
  • First dress made with graphene unveiled in the UK [Guardian]
  • Is this sewing robot the future of fashion? [Fast Company]
  • Starbucks Japan partners with fashion brand for contactless payments [BrandChannel]

START-UPS
  • Vestiaire Collective raises $62 million in pursuit of online luxury resale world domination [Fashionista]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce film social media sustainability technology

What you missed: Amazon didn’t kill Macy’s, Alibaba’s anti-counterfeiting bid, LVMH on sustainability

Macy's Amazon
Who really killed Macy’s?

So is Amazon the big threat to retail, or do retailers really have themselves to blame? There’s a great piece from Recode exploring the longer-term demise of Macy’s. No surprise to also see Neiman Marcus’ IPO has been stalled given current market conditions. The Limited is another US store announcing its closure over the past week.

Meanwhile, other big news to know about include a bid to fight counterfeit goods on Alibaba, PETA aiming to disrupt LVMH from the inside (as well as a separate piece on how LVMH is making luxury more sustainable), and yet more advertising updates on both Instagram and Snapchat. If you haven’t seen it, don’t forget to also check out our list of the 8 top tech trends for fashion and luxury retail in 2017.


TOP STORIES
  • Amazon didn’t kill Macy’s. Macy’s did [Recode]
  • Alibaba forms anti-counterfeiting alliance with Louis Vuitton, Swarovski and others [WWD]
  • Bernard Arnault meets with President-Elect Donald Trump [WWD]
  • What happens when beauty, health and wellness products move from standardised to personalised? [Loose Threads]
  • These stores smell money inside your brain [Bloomberg]

BUSINESS
  • Neiman Marcus IPO will stay on the shelf [Bloomberg]
  • PETA is now a Louis Vuitton shareholder [Fashionista]
  • An inside view of how LVMH makes luxury more sustainable [HBR]
  • Diane von Furstenberg debuts hip new logo, website ahead of fashion month [Fashionista]
  • Expect experimental evolution, not revolution, at Valentino [BoF]
  • Jimmy Choo co-founder goes stiletto-first into the digital future [Fast Company]
  • Lessons learned from Neil Blumenthal, the co-founder and co-CEO of Warby Parker [AlleyWatch]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Asos, Nike and Airbnb first to use Instagram Stories’ new ad formats [The Drum]
  • Snapchat is about to get a major redesign – including search bar [Mashable]
  • L’Oréal Paris brought Snapchat Spectacles to the red carpet for the Golden Globes [Digiday]

MARKETING
  • Sephora is ramping up its mission to empower women in 2017 via sustainability and technology [Fashionista]
  • Nike Women got FKA Twigs to creative direct this mesmerising new ad [AdWeek]
  • Film student’s emotional Adidas ad goes viral as viewers urge the brand to take notice [The Drum]
  • Chopard explains etiquette for 21st-century man in whimsical vignettes [Luxury Daily]

RETAIL
  • The Limited officially closes all stores, moves online [Retail Dive]
  • Matches CEO: Customers want speed and convenience [CNBC]
  • Lush evolves digital offerings to better connect with consumers [Glossy]
  • Kohl’s continued digital innovation drives loyalty [RIS News]

TECHNOLOGY
  • From gimmick to game-changer: How virtual reality will alter the fashion industry [Glossy]
  • Tanvas’ haptic feedback system lets you feel texture on a touchscreen [The Verge]
Categories
business digital snippets mobile social media Startups technology

What you missed: endangered fashion unicorns, Dior’s YouTube moves, Facebook marketplace

fashion unicorns
Fashion ‘unicorns’ have become an endangered species

This week’s round-up of relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech news neatly sums up a series of things to be tracking at present: the evolution of social media businesses into greater advertising and commercial retail opportunities, the role customer service and messaging apps play together, the explosion of all things virtual and augmented reality, and an ongoing bevy of start-ups to know about.

Meanwhile, also worth reading this week is detail on David Lauren’s promotion to the role of chief innovation officer over at Ralph Lauren, Dior’s catch up strategy on YouTube, and the growth of physical stores by online players including Warby Parker and Bonobos.


TOP STORIES
  • Fashion ‘unicorns’ have become an endangered species [BoF]
  • Dior’s borrowing Chanel’s strategies to catch up on YouTube [Glossy]
  • Mastercard launches ‘selfie pay’ [FT]

BUSINESS
  • LVMH to buy majority stake in Germany’s Rimowa for $716 million [BoF]
  • Swarovski, maker of all things bejewelled, refashions itself as a tech company [NY Times]
  • As their incomes rise, Chinese consumers are trading up and going beyond necessities [McKinsey]
  • Ralph Lauren promotes founder’s son to chief innovation officer [Bloomberg]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Facebook launches Marketplace for local buying and selling [Reuters]
  • For young brands, is the Instagram opportunity shrinking? [BoF]
  • Pinterest Promoted Video lands in the UK with Hunter on board as a partner [The Drum]
  • Snapchat users are spending 78 seconds on average playing Under Armour’s Cam Newton game [AdWeek]
  • An inside look at Snapchat’s new advertising API technology [AdAge]

ADVERTISING
  • Reebok adds Gigi Hadid to #PerfectNever campaign [MediaPost]
  • Farfetch inspires consumers to find the perfect product in new #TheOne campaign [Luxury Daily]
  • Google, Facebook become focus of holiday digital campaigns [MediaPost]

RETAIL
  • Warby Parker, Bonobos have big plans for physical stores [WSJ]
  • Shopify adds Facebook Messenger direct sales channel [Retail Dive]
  • Salesforce launches LiveMessage to provide customer service across messaging apps [VentureBeat]
  • Cocktails, cinemas and concierges: Malls weave a web of their own to entice customers [Financial Post]
  • Now you can sign up for a “.shopping” domain name [Apparel]
  • The Outnet launches first android app [Fashion United]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Japanese brand Anrealage hosts augmented reality fashion show [Glossy]
  • Mark Zuckerberg’s VR selfie is a bigger deal than you realise [Wired]
  • Will Google’s ‘soft and cozy’ approach to VR headsets make the space more mainstream? [AdWeek]
  • The mainstreaming of augmented reality: a brief history [HBR]

START-UPS
  • Venture capitalists invest $56 billion in start-ups so far in 2016 [Reuters]
  • New app co-created by Elon Musk’s estranged wife could be a game-changer for retail [BGR]
  • Online fashion retailer Grana raises $10M led by Alibaba’s entrepreneurship fund [TechCrunch]