Categories
Retail technology

Mango launches digital fitting rooms

Mango digital fitting room
Mango’s digital fitting room

Mango is the latest fashion retailer to be exploring digital fitting rooms, creating an “Internet of Things mirror” in partnership with Vodafone and Jogotech.

The experience allows shoppers to scan the tags in the items they have brought in to see suggestions of pieces that would complete the look, as well as be able to request different sizes and colors of the ones they’re trying on. Sales associates are alerted via a digital watch.

The mirrors currently exist in the brand’s new flagship store in Lisbon, and is being tested in other cities worldwide. The aim is to roll the digital fitting rooms out to all of the company’s top stores.

According to the team, this is the first phase of a digital transformation project for Mango designed to create new ways for customers to engage and relate to the brand.

Mango’s chief client officer, Guillermo Corominas, said: “This is a really exciting project for Mango. We see the future of retailing as a blend of the online and the offline. These new fitting rooms are another step in the digital transformation of our stores to create a whole new experience for our customers.”

Vodafone’s director of Internet of Things, Stefano Gastaut, added: “This project helps put more power at the shopper’s fingertips and will bring Mango closer to its fashion conscious shoppers and offer them more options and experiences than a conventional fitting room.”

Other retailers experimenting with this sort of technology have included Rebecca Minkoff, Ralph Lauren and Tommy Hilfiger. The latter has made it a standard part of the refit of its Regent Street store, dubbed its “store of the future” in London.

Categories
digital snippets e-commerce Editor's pick mobile social media technology

Digital snippets: high-skilled immigration, The Outnet’s social study, Kors on customer loyalty

digital snippets michael kors
Michael Kors on Instagram

We’re back with another round-up of everything you might have missed in fashion, digital comms and technology news over the past week. Top of the agenda is a perspective on why high-skilled immigration policy is important for fashion and tech, while there’s also highlights from The Outnet, Michael Kors, Tiffany & Co, Zaraa and moe.

We’re now taking a leaf out of the European guidebook and having a bit of a summer break. Hoping you all get to do the same and we’ll see you soon!


  • Why high-skilled immigration policy is vital for fashion and tech [Medium]

  • The Outnet’s social media study on joy provides key content lessons for brands [Forbes]

  • Michael Kors is turning Instagram into a customer-loyalty vehicle (as pictured) [Glossy]

  • Tiffany & Co releases a Snapchat filter [Allure]

  • Zara pulls products after plagiarism allegations on social media [Retail Dive]

  • Yoox Net-a-Porter boss Federico Marchetti looks to China for sales growth [South China Morning Post]

  • Madewell launches 24 days of denim campaign [WWD]

  • Selfridges launches social shopping app [Mobile Marketing]

  • Nike gives babies a stirring speech on unfairness, ambition and triumph [AdWeek]

  • Primark and Ross thumb their noses at e-commerce, will it work? [Forbes]

  • Combatant Gentlemen is tech first, fashion second [WSJ]

  • Fashion retailer New York & Company plans to lift sales with Shopkick rewards [Geomarketing]

  • Vodafone’s Internet of Things swimsuit detects harmful UV levels [Campaign]

  • Drones: Giant leap forward as UK agrees Amazon tests [Trendwalk]

  • Why retailers still struggle with omnichannel—and how they can conquer the challenge [Retail Dive]

  • Inside Pinterest’s effort to woo fashion brands [Glossy]

  • The internet is so bad, it’s awesome [BoF]

  • The pull of personal stylists in the online-shopping era [The Atlantic]

  • What 3D printing means for fashion [BoF]