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Instagram’s new AR feature, France introduces anti-waste laws, BoF inclusion backlash

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Instagram adds new AR experience to checkout (Mashable)
  • France to introduce anti-waste law to promote circular economy (Fashion United)
  • ‘Inclusion is a trend for these folks’: Kerby Jean-Raymond calls out ‘insulting’ BoF 500 Gala (Fashionista)
TECHNOLOGY
  • Microsoft debuts foldable smartphone for 2020 holiday season (Mobile Marketer)
  • Sky News is broadcasting on Amazon Twitch (Digiday)
  • Google shoppings gets redesign with price tracking and personalization (The Verge)
  • Levi’s and Google’s smart jacket upgrade (Wired)
  • Paralyzed man ‘walks’ using mind-reading exoskeleton (Futurism)
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Evrnu raises $9million to close the textile lifecycle loop (Sourcing Journal)
  • The rise of hemp as a sustainable alternative to cotton (Vogue Business)
  • Zalando ‘boosts green credentials’ with sustainability initiative (Retail Week)
  • Vegan fashion week returns to Los Angeles (Fashion United)
  • Biogarmentry are clothes that can photosynthesise like plants (Dezeen)
  • Sketchers has reduced plastic use in packaging by 85% (Sourcing Journal)
RETAIL & COMMERCE
  • America’s first cannabis cafe is open for business (Futurism)
  • Auxiliary opens augmented reality pop up at Selfridges (Glossy)
  • Banksy launches range of branded merchandise (Dezeen)
  • Kardashian Kloset takes on the resale market (Vogue Business)
  • The Row opens debut London flagship store (Fashion United)
  • Vagabond extends e-commerce site to the US (Glossy)
  • L’Oreal launches Hair.com in direct to consumer move (Glossy)
BUSINESS
  • Vivienne Westwood plunges into the red (Drapers)
  • H&M reports strong rise in Q3 sales and profit (Fashion United)
  • Stitch Fix expands beyond the ‘fix’ (Vogue Business)
  • Ted Baker swings to half-year loss (Drapers)
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Adidas, Levi’s, Michael Kors test Instagram launch alerts (Mobile Marketer)
  • With Drest, digital clothing is one step closer to mainstream (Vogue Business)
  • E.l.f Cosmetics launches first TikTok hashtag featuring original song (Mobile Marketer)
PRODUCT
  • Reformation and New Balance partner for sustainable sneaker collaboration (WWD)
  • Saint Laurent unveils new contraceptive creation (Fashion Network)
  • Neiman Marcus introduces ‘clean beauty’ (Retail Dive)
  • Asos taps hip-hop artist Swae Lee for exclusive edit (Fashion United)
CULTURE
  • Valentino’s ‘opulence of diversity’ (BoF)
  • Melinda Gates pledges $1billion to boost the ‘power and influence’ of women in the US (Fast Company)
  • Debenhams partners with National Autistic Society for autism hour (Retail Gazette)
  • Rihanna’s Savage X Fenty supports breast cancer survivors (Fashion Network)
  • Vans competition pulls sneaker brand into Hong Kong political row (BoF)

How are you thinking about innovation? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more.

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business Editor's pick sustainability

Purposeful innovation leads British Fashion Council award winners


“Purpose is the new luxury,” said Cyrill Gutsch, founder of Parley for the Oceans, at the British Fashion Council’s annual awards last night, which celebrated creativity and innovation from across the industry. 

He picked up the Special Recognition Award for Innovation, for his work recycling plastics recovered from the ocean into new products for brands including adidas, G-Star and Stella McCartney.

He echoed a theme that resonated throughout the evening focused on pushing for a positive revolution in light of climate change. “The planet is broken, the oceans are nearly dead and we need a dream of a magic blue universe that is well protected – something that we actually fight for together,” he said.

Also focused on this message was Dame Vivienne Westwood, who picked up the Swarovski Award for Positive Change. She used the occasion to give an impassioned speech about capitalism and the industry’s enormous responsibility to protect the planet.

Activism continued as a theme throughout the evening, with references made to Brexit, the Paris riots and even the Cambridge Analytica and Facebook data scandal revealed earlier this year.

Miuccia Prada, on reception of the Outstanding Achievement Award, added: “Just a little note for fashion, I think more and more we should feel a responsibility for defending human rights and freedom.”

Dame Vivienne Westwood
Dame Vivienne Westwood

A surprise for guests meanwhile came when HRH The Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle, arrived on stage to present the British womenswear designer of the year award to Clare Waight Keller for Givenchy, who was of course the designer behind the dress for her wedding to Prince Harry.

Meghan took the opportunity to reference female empowerment: “As all of you in this room know, we have a deep connection to what we wear. Sometimes it’s very personal, sometimes it’s emotional. But for me, this connection is rooted in really being able to understand that it’s about supporting and empowering each other, especially as women. When we choose to wear a certain designer, we’re not just a reflection of their creativity and their vision, but we’re also an extension of their values, of something in the fabric, so to speak, that is much more meaningful. I recently read an article that said, ‘The culture of fashion has shifted from one where it was cool to be cruel to now, where it’s cool to be kind’.”

Other awards during the evening went to Craig Green as menswear designer of the year, Demna Gvasalia for Balenciaga as accessories designer of the year, Marco Bizzarri for Gucci as business leader, and Virgil Abloh for Off-White, in the Urban Luxe category. Gucci won the brand of the year, while Pierpaolo Piccioli of Valentino picked up the overarching designer of the year award.

Emerging talent accolades went to Samuel Ross for A-COLD-WALL* and Richard Quinn, while Kaia Gerber picked up model of the year. There were also special recognition awards to Kim Jones as the 2018 trailblazer and to Mert & Marcus, who won the Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator.

This year also marks the first time the awards have celebrated a young global creative community with the launch of the“NEW WAVE: Creatives”, which recognized 100 of the most innovative and inspiring young creative talent from around the world.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Editor's pick sustainability

Global fashion brand transparency is on the rise, says new industry report

Fashion Revolution
Fashion Revolution

Adidas and Reebok are leading the way towards greater transparency among major corporate players, according to a new report from sustainable non-profit organization, Fashion Revolution.

Research released in the 2018 Fashion Transparency Index shows improvement across the industry, with the 100 brands reviewed showing an overall increase of 5% in their transparency levels.

The study reviews and ranks major global brands and retailers according to their social and environmental policies, practices and impacts. The top 10 brands for transparency in 2018 also include Puma, H&M, Esprit, Banana Republic, Gap, Old Navy, C&A and Marks & Spencer.

On the fifth anniversary of the Rana Plaza building collapse in Bangladesh, Fashion Revolution highlights the importance for brands to be fair and transparent, particularly when it comes to impact on the lives of workers in the supply chain and on the environment.

The non-profit is also holding a weeklong series of events with designers around the world, sharing their ideas, processes and best practice when it comes to transparency. Designers taking part include Stella McCartney, Phoebe English, Christopher Raeburn and Vivienne Westwood with aims of engaging the consumer further in the conversation of who makes their clothes.

Fashion Revolution’s global operations director and founder Carry Somers said: “Over the last five years, millions of consumers have demanded a fairer, safer, cleaner industry. It’s working. We can see that brands are listening and the industry is starting to change.

“We’re calling upon the global fashion industry to turn its commitment to responsible sourcing into effective action this Fashion Revolution Week. Too many people working in the fashion industry, mostly women, are still underpaid, unsafe and mistreated. It’s time for change”.

In a plea to promote the conversation around supply chain transparency on a wider scale, Fashion Revolution has also launched its manifesto, laying out action points they believe will achieve a cleaner and safer fashion industry. Beyond the actionable steps, the company is also calling on consumers in general to spread the word via shareable social media assets and additional reading material.

For more content on brands striving to achieve a more sustainable supply chain, see TheCurrent Daily’s Sustainability category, which includes innovations by winners of this year’s Index such as Stella McCartney’s mushroom leather handbag and adidas’ pledge to use only recycled ocean plastics by 2020.

Categories
digital snippets e-commerce product social media technology

What you missed: See-now-buy-now, Nicopanda x Amazon, Kering tops sustainability index

Nicopanda spring 2018 will see one-hour delivery from Amazon
Nicopanda spring 2018 will see one-hour delivery from Amazon

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past week.


TOP STORIES
  • Three seasons in, see-now-buy-now is going nowhere [Glossy]
  • Amazon tests one-hour catwalk-to-doorstep deliveries at Nicopanda show [Reuters]
  • Kering tops the Dow Jones Sustainability Index once more [FashionUnited]
  • British Fashion Council launches climate change initiative with Vivienne Westwood [BoF]

BUSINESS
  • The trouble with Topshop [BoF]
  • Hermès hits record first-half profit [FT]
  • BFC/Vogue Designer Fashion Fund announces JD.com partnership [The Industry]
  • Giorgio Armani on London fashion week: ‘It’s the only true city where you see the creative turmoil’ [The Guardian]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Victoria Beckham takes top spot in digital engagement during NYFW [WWD]
  • How Mario Testino found a new lens through Instagram [Campaign]

MARKETING
  • Mick Rock shoots Rome residents for Gucci campaign [Dazed]
  • Inside Dior’s first micro-influencer campaign [Glossy]
  • Puma signs long-term partnership with Selena Gomez [FashionUnited]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Liu Qiangdong, the ‘Jeff Bezos of China’, on making billions with JD.com [FT]
  • eBay moves into luxury with fashion start-up Spring [Racked]

TECHNOLOGY
  • All the tech plans for Tommy Hilfiger’s LFW show [Forbes]

PRODUCT
  • Stone Island’s thermo-sensitive ice knitwear collection changes colour in cold weather [Design Boom]
  • Nike introduces Flyleather, its latest ‘super material’ [BoF]
  • Nike unveils ‘connected’ jersey for NBA partnership [BoF]

START-UPS
  • Fashion start-up wants customers to be able to customise every item they buy [PSFK]
  • Natalie Massenet joins seed funding for hosiery start-up Heist [BoF]
Categories
technology

Google and the BFC launch educational platform for British fashion

Google and the BFC's new platform for British fashion
Google and the BFC’s new platform for British fashion

The British Fashion Council has partnered with Google’s Arts & Culture team to celebrate British fashion via a new educational platform that includes several virtual reality experiences.

Launched ahead of last night’s new Fashion Awards, which honoured designers and other industry players from around the word, the g.co/britishfashion site is designed to inform and inspire future generations of young fashion creatives and students.

Support the BFC’s Education Foundation, it brings to life the creativity, heritage and craftsmanship of British fashion, pulling together content from big names in the space – including brands, designers, craftspeople, photographers, stylists, models and more – and using technology to tell their stories.

There are immersive digital exhibits from the likes of Burberry, Stella McCartney and Vivienne Westwood for instance, a virtual reality experience of Manolo Blahnik at work in his atelier, and a high resolution capture of a couture dress from Alexander McQueen’s SS17 collection, allowing people to zoom in and see its threadwork in never-before-seen detail.

To mark the launch of the project, Paul Smith has also designed a special-edition Google Cardboard to enable the virtual reality viewing, and created online exhibits around five objects that represent his creative vision and brand.

Caroline Rush CBE, CEO of the BFC said: “The internet has been an incredible resource for opening up the fashion industry to a new audience, giving young people access to information not previously available. This collaboration represents a new step, bringing together diverse information into one, engaging place. We hope this legacy project will not only inspire but also educate – allowing young people wanting to get into fashion to see the breadth of individuals, skills and careers that make up this multifaceted industry.”

In total, there are over 1,000 assets to explore, including 20 multimedia exhibits, 25 videos and three virtual reality experiences, all accessible from anywhere in the world, on desktop, laptop or mobile.

Sarah Mower MBE, American Vogue chief critic and BFC ambassador for emerging talent, has also directed a short film captured in 360 VR so viewers can come face-to-face with industry luminaries. Included are Naomi Campbell, Anya Hindmarch, Edward Enninful and Joan Burstein.

Users can also search archive material from British fashion houses by colour and chronology, explore profiles of numerous of the industry’s other key players, and go behind-the-scenes with top craftspeople and producers of British fashion, including the Royal School of Needlework and Brora Cashmere.

Categories
Comment Editor's pick

Comment counts: Human insights should drive both fashion trends and brand communications

Understanding changing human behaviour is the surest way to create a trend in fashion today, but such attitudes need to be reflected in our communications and not just products, argues Frances Docx of 18 Feet & Rising.

beyonce-ivy-park
Ivy Park

In the past, the fashion trend trajectory was simple: from fashion houses to magazines, consumers copying celebrities. Everyone knew their rightful place in the fashion food chain, and the clothes would remain on the high street until those in power decided a new season was ready to launch.

Cut to the internet and this online world has hastened and devolved the traditional fashion process entirely. Now trends can emerge from anywhere at any time – the high street, teens on Instagram… a Wikihow page with a seven-step illustrated guide to starting your own.

In a world of microwave-minute attention spans and a ‘buy now’ impulse control disorder, fashion brands have to look beyond short-lived trend sources towards something that endures and evolves as their brand does.

So where should they turn for inspiration to create fresh and enduring work? Where we’ve always looked: to people. The surest way to predict a trend is to create one. And the most effective way to create a trend is to study and predict human behaviour and attitudes.

A topline example: UK gym membership spending is up by 44%. What’s the consequence for fashion? You can’t move for box-fresh Adidas Stan Smiths, endless versions of the ‘athleisure’ trend and the likes of Beyoncé’s newly launched fitness line, Ivy Park, crashing the Topshop website.

Looking good has become so synonymous with physical fitness that by a series of cognitive leaps everyone is wearing tennis shoes – with no intention of playing tennis. And we don’t care either, by the way. We only care if the white on our kicks stays bright.

And what else? We only wear 20% of our wardrobe on a regular basis and we throw away over one million tonnes of clothing and other textiles in the UK each year. It’s not because we don’t like the rejected 80%; generally we do, but maybe the fit isn’t quite right, the neckline is a bit low and we’d rather wear one of our old favourites.

Meanwhile, instead of the buy-it-cheap-pile-it-high Primark mentality, we also see disrupters such as Tom Cridland entering the mass market with his 30-year sweatshirt. Or designers such as Vivienne Westwood that encourage shoppers to choose well so they only choose once.

Everyday people are changing the face of retail. Brands must realise, respect and pay attention to this. And the impact must be reflected not only in the product on their shelves but in the way they communicate to consumers.

Insights (the behaviour and perceptual mapping of trends) have long been the bread and butter of brand communications. But up until now they have retreated behind the “Advertising Idea” like a hungover mollusk.

Communications today are firmly driven by the “we understand you” mantra; capitalising on emotionally charged purchasing. We see this in the UK with personalised discounting like the MyWaitrose scheme, through to the advent of Memevertising such as with House of Fraser’s “My Face When…” 2015 campaign (as above, by 18 Feet & Rising).

To those in fashion scratching their heads over the latest trend reports working out how to make SS17 and beyond fresh – put down that colour palette, stop looking at what your fashion forefathers have done and consider applying these rules of thumb:

  • Be more human
  • Listen more
  • Watch more
  • Copy

Don’t predict fashion trends, predict behaviour change.

Frances Docx is a planner at creative agency 18 Feet & Rising. Comment Counts is a series of opinion pieces from experts within the industry. Do you have something to say? Get in touch via info@fashionandmash.com.

Categories
film social media

Topshop launches Kate Moss video series ahead of new collection

Topshop has revealed the first in a series of videos in the run up to its new Kate Moss collection launch.

The line will hit stores on April 30 for the first time since 2010. Accordingly the retailer has teamed up with NOWNESS to tease its arrival through a total of eight films dedicated to the “supermodel, muse and designer”.

Each one will feature one of Kate’s friends and fashion contacts shot by Leigh Johnson, and providing “never before seen access to the notoriously private Kate”, as Grazia puts it.

The first, as above, stars BBC Radio 1 DJ Nick Grimshaw. Others will include Charlotte Tilbury, Amanda Harlech, Beth Ditto, Cara Delevingne, Vivienne Westwood and Natalie Massenet. That makes a total of seven, meaning the eighth may star the always-elusive Moss herself.

Here in the meantime is an additional Topshop teaser featuring the model talking about the collection from behind-the-scenes at the Topshop design studio:

Categories
film social media

Cannes Lions 2013 round-up: fashion and beauty winners

CannesLions_JustinCooke_Topshop

It was a big year for fashion at the 60th annual Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity – the ad industry’s version of the Oscars if you will. As already reported, Burberry, Vivienne Westwood and Annie Leibovitz were all on stage, as was Justin Cooke, CMO of Topshop (as pictured), in a guest appearance during YouTube’s slot.

He talked to the idea of emotion in marketing: “When people feel happy, they want to influence others to do the same. At Topshop we refer to the three I’s; ignite a conversation, inspire our customers and then use that influence to build our UK-centric brand into a global entity.”

Topshop walked away with a bronze Media Lion for best use of social media for its Future of the Fashion Show campaign in February.

Here are some of the other fashion and beauty campaigns that won:

Dove Real Beauty Sketches: No surprise here – this campaign picked up the Titanium Grand Prix at Cannes as well as gold Lions in nearly every other category. Created by Ogilvy Brasil, it aimed to prove to women they’re more beautiful than they think they are by conducting a social experiment whereby an FBI-trained sketch artist drew their portraits based first on their own descriptions and then a stranger’s. The resulting film, which captures their reactions to the sketches, racked up over 4.5bn social media impressions. Dove also won a gold in the Film category for its Camera Shy campaign.

Nike Find Your Greatness: Always a big winner at Cannes, this year was no exception for Nike. It won a silver in the Titanium category for its Find Your Greatness campaign that surrounded last year’s Olympics. Ambush marketing at its finest (given Nike wasn’t an official sponsor), it highlighted that greatness isn’t reserved for just the elite athletes participating in the big event in the chosen city, but can be found worldwide – importantly in all the other places around the world also called London. Nike also won a silver for its Jogger campaign, and bronzes for She Runs the Night and Voices.

adidas Window Shopping: Not to be outdone, adidas also walked away with an armful of awards, this time for its adidas Neo Window Shopping initiative created by TBWA Helsinki. This saw a fully functional virtual store accessible from on the street by combining windows with the brand’s already existing e-commerce. Users could connect their smartphones via a simple URL and a pin (no need for an app or QR codes here), and then interact with the products on screen, dragging them into a shopping bag to make them appear on their own device to buy. It won both gold and silver Cyber Lions, as well as three bronzes in the Media and Mobile categories.

Macy’s Yes, Virginia the Musical: Macy’s localised its long-standing Yes, Virginia campaign in 2012 with a musical for schools in the busy run-up to the Christmas period. That initiative, created by JWT New York, saw it winning both a gold and a silver Lion in the Branded Content and Entertainment category.

Uniqlo Storms Pinterest: A smart move by Uniqlo over Pinterest also scooped a gold Lion in the Design category at Cannes this year. To promote its new Dry Mesh T-Shirts the Japanese retailer, along with Firstborn New York, created an impossible-to-miss, branded mosaic on the virtual scrapbooking site. As users scrolled through Pinterest’s public feeds giant blocks of branded images appeared and seemed to animate. It was done using 100 shell accounts on the platform that were later switched to branded Uniqlo ones. Uniqlo also won a bronze Media Lion for its Wake Up campaign.

Kmart Ship my Pants: You may have spotted this one already – Kmart’s humourous new video ad that plays on the phrase “Ship my Pants” to tout its new free shipping service. A winner for me on element of surprise alone, and at Cannes with silvers and bronzes in both the Film and Promo & Activation categories.

Geox Amphibox: Geox’s campaign for its everyday waterproof shoe walked away with gold, silver and bronze awards in the Cyber category as well as a bronze in Media. The aim was to prove the performance qualities of the shoes, so the team took four Facebook fans to the wettest place on earth, Cherrapunjee in India (which receives 11.7m of annual rainfall) to put them to the test. An online interactive documentary resulted.

Asos #bestnightever: I’ve commented a lot on shoppable films in the past, but there’s no escaping the fact they’re slowly making an increasing impact in the advertising space. Asos won a silver Media Lion on that basis this year for its #bestnightever campaign (even if the stats that went alongside aren’t necessarily directly the result of it to be honest), which saw three shoppable music videos created.

Bronze awards otherwise went to:

  • Louis Vuitton in Film for its Core Values campaign starring Muhammad Ali
  • Converse in Outdoor for its Highways campaign

And here’s a particularly nice message from Christopher Bailey, chief creative officer of Burberry, to close: “You have to take a leap of faith to move into a world that your industry or sector is not used to, but if you believe in it, and can feel it, it will be stronger and more believable in itself.”

Categories
Comment social media

Burberry campaign offers first glimpse of fashion presence at Cannes Lions

Burberry Kisses - World of Kisses

As you’ll have likely already seen, Burberry launched its new Kisses campaign in partnership with Google late last week, offering consumers the ability to capture their real kisses and share them with loved ones around the world via digital. That initiative was part of the British heritage brand’s Art, Copy & Code tie up with Google that is due to be showcased at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, otherwise known as advertising’s biggest global awards – in the South of France this week.

As previously posted, but worth reiterating here, Burberry CCO Christopher Bailey is due to take to the stage on Friday (the festival runs from June 16 – 22) to talk about “digital’s creative revolution” with Google’s head of marketing, Lorraine Twohill.

The write-up for the session adds: “How do you engage your audience when ad views are voluntary? What happens when the physical and digital worlds intersect? How can data enable creativity? What if ads didn’t have to look or feel like ads? The only way to find the answers is through risk taking and experimentation.” There’s no denying Burberry Kisses ticks off all of that criteria.

Two years ago I wrote this article about the significant lack of fashion presence throughout Cannes. It focused on the fact that fashion communications remained largely about print ads selling product over campaigns selling ideas, a viewpoint I still hold at large, but certainly one that is beginning to shift – as proven by Burberry. In doing so, it’s sparking more relevance than ever for these brands to start making an appearance at Cannes, both on the delegates list and in those nominated for awards.

Elsewhere at Cannes therefore are other fashion types in attendance too – Vivienne Westwood speaking with SapientNitro to “de-construct the narrative behind some of the most innovative stories of all-time”, and photographer Annie Leibovitz as part of a panel discussing the “genesis, evolution and continued success of the global ‘Disney Dream Portraits Series’.”

I’m down here already and will be covering throughout, as well as live tweeting via my personal account, so do follow along.

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Uncategorized

Social stats from #LFW

This London Fashion Week was the most social yet, with over 225,000 online conversations, according to insights firm Precise.

It almost goes without saying the volume of chatter would be up on previous seasons, but it’s good to see that figure has reportedly almost doubled in a year. Better yet, over 95% of the posts overall were positive.

A few more interesting stats:

  • Burberry led the way with over 21,000 mentions on Twitter, Facebook and blogs. Referenced in over one third of them however, was the presence of One Direction pop star Harry Styles
  • Topshop meanwhile garnered 10,000 mentions, followed by Vivienne Westwood with 3,000
  • Lady Gaga’s appearance at Philip Treacy’s show generated over 5,000 mentions in association with LFW, while Treacy himself only attracted 3,000
  • When it comes to emerging labels, the two winners on social were Mary Katrantzou with over 2,700 comments, and House of Holland, with over 2,500

*Precise’s research is based on keyword analysis of every English language social media post created during LFW, followed by a qualitative examination of a sample of posts