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ICYMI: ‘Sustainability’ arrives in annual reports, Prada goes fur-free, a lack of female fashion CEOs

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week. 

TOP STORIES
  • Tracking sustainability’s rise as one of fashion’s favourite words [Vogue Business]
  • Prada is the latest brand to go fur-free [Dazed]
  • Fashion has shockingly few female CEOs [Quartz]
  • What’s stopping the fashion industry from agreeing on climate action? [BoF]
  • E-Commerce giant Alibaba to integrate blockchain into intellectual property system [Yahoo]
TECHNOLOGY
  • World’s first digital only blockchain clothing sells for $9,500 [Forbes]
  • San Francisco becomes the first US city to ban government facial recognition [Wired]
  • AI avatars could be the next generation’s favorite entertainers [TNW]
  • Driverless electric truck starts deliveries on Swedish public road [FashionNetwork]
  • Future smart clothes will keep you the perfect temperature at all times [Digital Trends]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • How charitable are fashion’s biggest companies? [Vogue Business]
  • The young activists fighting to ‘rebrand’ air pollution [Dazed]
  • Walmart agrees to power more than 40 stores with solar energy [Bloomberg]
  • Kering sets new animal welfare guidelines [FashionUnited]
  • The Body Shop launches fair trade recycled plastic scheme [i-D]
  • Single-use plastics a serious climate change hazard, study warns [Guardian]
  • Scientists devise ‘breakthrough’ plastic that can be recycled again and again [Sourcing Journal]
  • Why Russia still loves fur [Vogue Business]
  • This clothing brand’s new repair program shows that the future of fashion can be circular [Fast Company]
RETAIl & E-COMMERCE
  • How department stores are using services to convince customers they’re still convenient places to shop [Digiday]
  • Urban Outfitters tries to stay relevant with an $88 monthly rental service [Fast Company]
  • Walmart’s ambitious plan to beat Amazon on free one-day shipping is here [Fast Company]
  • Why online fashion retailers are experimenting with invite-only access [Forbes]
  • Klarna announces first UK immersive pop-up [FashionUnited]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Calvin Klein apologizes following “queerbaiting” accusations for Bella Hadid & Lil Miquela ad [Hype Bae]
  • Nike runs shoppable Snapchat lens to support women’s soccer [Mobile Marketer]
  • How will in-game advertising change as Google, Facebook, Snap and Apple level up? [Mobile Marketer]
PRODUCT
  • So what does Rihanna’s first Fenty collection actually look like? [NY Times]
  • PrettyLittleThing launches recycled collection [Drapers]
  • Vivobarefoot launches plant-based shoe [FashionUnited]
BUSINESS
  • Body Shop owner to buy Avon for £1.6bn [BBC]
  • Topshop is closing all its US stores [Refinery29]
  • Farfetch revenue soars [Drapers]
  • Richemont profit misses estimates on online investment costs [BoF]
  • Nike, Adidas and others call on Trump to remove footwear from tariff list [RetailDive]
CULTURE
  • ‘I want to tilt the lens’ – Sinéad Burke’s fight to make fashion more diverse [Guardian]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

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data social media technology

Urban Outfitters launches live shopping parties on influencer app Dote

Urban Outfitters has partnered with social shopping app Dote on a pilot that allows influencers to host live-streamed shopping parties within the platform.

The app, initially launched in 2014, is geared towards a younger audience and heavily relies on the social element of shopping. One of its main features, for instance, allows influencers (or Dote Creators) to create their own profiles and wishlist products across the app’s 150-strong brand inventory, which followers can then shop from. This new feature, called “Shopping Party”, will enable Creators to host 15min-long live streams shopping solely from one brand.

“When we stopped going to malls with our friends and started shopping online, the experience became one skewed toward convenience and assortment,” says Dote founder and CEO Lauren Farleigh. “Along the way, we lost the social experience that shopping can be, which so many people have enjoyed throughout the history of commerce.”

Since its inception, Dote has raised $23 million in funding and added major Gen Z-focused brands and retailers to its assortment, from Asos and Brandy Melville to Madewell. In July 2018, it announced the launch of its first exclusive collection, with YouTube star Emma Chamberlain.

How are you thinking about e-commerce innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

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business Campaigns Editor's pick mobile product Retail technology

WeWork and LIKEtoKNOW.it introduce influencer shopping to office spaces

Co-working company WeWork is partnering with influencer shopping platform LIKEtoKNOW.it to host a pop-up space at a London location where all decor is shoppable.

Located at Aviation House, WeWork’s newest office location in London, the space will be open for the month of January and is decorated with influencers and social media sharing in mind, featuring goods from brands such as Urban Outfitters, Amazon, Matalan and Debenhams. All products are then available to shop directly through the LIKEtoKNOW.it app.

“At WeWork, we’re focused on creating a working environment that fosters collaboration as well as productivity, and this LIKEtoKNOW.it pop-up will only increase the opportunities for our members to connect,” said Mathieu Proust, general manager of WeWork UK and Ireland.

The activation also has a customer acquisition angle as WeWork is offering people who are not members of its network the chance to sign up online and visit the pop-up space for a day, as well as use all other facilities in the office space.

WeWork has been working hard on expanding its retail capabilities over the past year. This is the second time it collaborates with the shopping platform on a retail experience, having hosted a similar space in a Miami location last year where all products were sourced from Walmart. Over the summer, it also launched WeMRKT, which sells products made by its members. Lastly in October 2018, it introduced designated Rent the Runway drop-off spots in six major US cities, including New York, Chicago and Miami, in order to facilitate returns to members of both services.

To support the continued expansion of its business ventures, WeWork rebranded as The We Company earlier this week.

How are you thinking about interactive retail experiences? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more

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business digital snippets e-commerce film Retail social media Startups sustainability technology

ICYMI: LVMH’s digital strategy, feathers in fashion, the McQueen documentary

Proenza Schouler
Proenza Schouler

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Decoding LVMH’s digital strategy [BoF]
  • Is the use of feathers in fashion any more ethical than fur? [Fashionista]
  • The McQueen documentary tells the story of the people who carry his legacy [Vogue]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Why Nordstrom is betting on high-touch tech [Fortune]
  • Avery Dennison and SoftWear Automation to create digital supply chain for manufacturers [SupplyChainDigital]
SUSTAINABILITY
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • How Sephora built a beauty empire to survive the retail apocalypse [CBInsights]
  • This is how a brick-and-mortar store can thrive in the age of Amazon [NYMag]
  • Urban Outfitters launches third-party marketplace, tests self-checkout [RetailDive]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Nike sells out of Facebook Messenger sneaker drop in less than an hour [RetailDive]
  • Givenchy and Stella McCartney score on Instagram at Royal Wedding [WWD]
  • Victoria’s Secret is still advertising to women like it’s 1999 [Bloomberg]
  • Esprit’s Instagram posts are now shoppable [FashionUnited]
  • This Ikea print ad is designed to put you to sleep [CreativityOnline]
  • Do influencers need regulating? [BoF]
BUSINESS
  • Balenciaga is now the fastest-growing label at Kering? [Harper’s Bazaar]
  • LVMH invests $60 million into fashion platform Lyst [HypeBeast]
  • Richemont clinches takeover of Yoox Net-A-Porter [Reuters]
  • Can the Model Alliance Respect program make a difference? [Vogue]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce film mobile social media technology

Digital snippets: Alibaba, Rebecca Minkoff, Kate Spade, Marc Jacobs, John Lewis, Urban Outfitters, Mulberry

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

rebeccaminkoff

  • Alibaba’s ‘Singles Day’ sales top $9 billion, bigger than Black Friday [MarketWatch]
  • Why Rebecca Minkoff and eBay are betting on smart dressing rooms [Fast Company]
  • Anna Kendrick makes something out of nothing in Kate Spade’s holiday ad [AdWeek]
  • Marc Jacobs built an in-house app for shopping on Instagram [Bostinno]
  • John Lewis and Microsoft unite to create tech-driven in-store experience around Christmas ad campaign with ‘Monty’s Magical Toy Machine’ [The Drum]
  • Urban Outfitters using beacons, tries pinging your phone in the fitting room [AdWeek]
  • Mulberry ‘wins Christmas’ with gifting ad [Campaign Live]
  • Harrods launches animated festive film [The Independent]
  • Burberry and Printemps promise a magical Christmas with interactive experience [Pursuitist]
  • Ralph Lauren and Harrods partner for mobile-enabled display [Mobile Marketing]
  • Behind Zegna’s Big Bet on Film [BoF]
  • Shoppable video: more retailers looking at film as direct sales channel [Digiday]
  • What’s trending in China’s digital luxury marketing [JingDaily]
  • Ballet shoe records specific dancer movements [PSFK]
  • Native advertising and style bloggers: is the party over? [Fashionista]
  • These jeans come in 400 sizes [Co.Design]
  • Amazon plans Prime Air delivery drone tests in the UK [TNW]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Amazon 3D printing, Zappos digital assistant, Target In a Snap app, and more

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

Jeff Bezos, Amazon 2012

  • What Amazon’s foray into 3D printing means for the industry [Fortune]
  • Zappos tests digital assistant that helps you track down any fashion item [CNET]
  • Target snaps up mobile shopping innovation with image recognition app [BrandChannel]
  • L’Oréal make-up goes virtual for selfie age [FT]
  • Yoox Group teams with messaging service WeChat [WWD]
  • Marie Claire’s innovative interactive magazine covers are breaking new ground in advertising real estate [BoF]
  • This Nike vending machine accepts only FuelBand points [Creativity]
  • Virtual reality: advertising’s next big thing? [AdAge]
  • Forever 21, Urban Outfitters among most popular retailers on Pinterest, relative newbie, Modcloth, tops list [Forbes]
  • 8 start-ups trying to help you find clothing that fits [Fashionista]
  • The new bazaar: in India, online stores catch on with buyers [NY Times]
  • New York Fashion Tech Lab program debuts at Hearst Tower [PSFK]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce social media technology

Digital snippets: H&M, Instagram, Uniqlo, Ferragamo, Urban Outfitters, Nike

Happy new year all and welcome to 2014!

It’s straight to Vegas for me and headfirst into CES for what’s looking set to be a week heavy on the wearables front. More of that to follow, but for now, here’s a highlight of some of the fashion and tech stories you may have missed over the past couple of weeks…

david-beckham-underwear_HM

  • H&M and Beckham return to The Super Bowl with ground-breaking shoppable TV ad campaign [WGSN]
  • Instagram reveals ‘promising’ results of Levi’s and Ben & Jerry’s ad trial [Marketing Magazine]
  • Ferragamo weaves founder’s history into fairy tale film [Luxury Daily]
  • Nike, MTV are top global brands on Instagram in 2013 [BrandChannel]
  • How in-store analytics is changing the way you shop [Fashionista]
  • Beacons: What they are, how they work, and why Apple’s iBeacon technology is ahead of the pack [Business Insider]
  • What fashion adds to the tech world: Vanessa Friedman on wearables [FT]
  • Smart eyelashes and fingernails: the next wave of wearable tech [Mashable]
  • Can Apple’s Angela Agrendts spark a retail revolution? [Fast Company]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce social media

Digital snippets: Nike, DVF, Michael Kors, Burt’s Bees, Free People, Chanel, Tory Burch

Here’s a rather hefty highlight of stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital of late:

NikePlus_FuelbandSE

  • Nike’s new FuelBand and the age of social products [BoF]
  • Michael Kors runs #WatchHungerStop animated GIF campaign for World Food Day [Fashionista]
  • Burt’s Bees taps Vine in literary campaign to  promote its classic products [Brandchannel]
  • How Free People is using big data and social commerce for bigger sales [Forbes]
  • Chanel touts cosmetics line through insider beauty tip videos [Luxury Daily]
  • How Tory Burch builds passionate customers: insights on its digital journey [Shop.org]
  • Ralph Lauren showcases accessories in ‘The Dog Walk’ digital video [WWD]
  • Urban Outfitters preps for Holidays with mobile investments [AdAge]
  • P’trique of Sh*t Fashion Girls Say joins The Outnet in LinkedIn video campaign [Fashionologie]
  • Bobbi Brown uses interactive Blippar app to bring Katie Holmes to life [BeautyWorldNews]
  • How Coach uses Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google+ [Econsultancy]
  • The major retailers most threatened by mobile showrooming, and how they’re fighting it [Business Insider]
Categories
data digital snippets e-commerce social media

Digital snippets: Macy’s, Levi’s, Fox & Fawn, Hermès, Nars, Nordstrom, Ferragamo

Here’s a rather hefty highlight of recent stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital:

Levis_hack

  • Macy’s: marketers should defend data use but show restraint [AdAge]
  • Levi’s hacks vintage items to function as modern-day social media devices (as pictured) [PSFK]
  • Fox & Fawn proves key example of how innovative retailers are turning Instagram into an e-commerce platform [Fashionista]
  • Hermès made the smart if overdue move of creating a scarf-tying app called Silk Knots [The Cut]
  • Nars previewing Guy Bourdin collection on Snapchat [WWD]
  • Nordstrom: how to remain relevant in a tech savvy world [Forbes]
  • Salvatore Ferragamo looks to the web to lure young consumers [Reuters]
  • Fendi microsite increases brand awareness during Milan Fashion Week [Luxury Daily]
  • M&S to contact workers in Asia by mobile to check factory conditions [The Guardian]
  • Net-A-Porter bets on social commerce with new ‘Netbook’ iPad app [Econsultancy]
  • Pinterest announces first ad product: promoted pins [Mashable]
  • Olapic brings the persuasive power of user-generated imagery to e-commerce [BoF]
Categories
film social media

How fashion brands are using Vine

This article first appeared on Mashable

Fashionbrands_Vine

The fashion industry immediately embraced Vine, Twitter’s 6-second video app, after it launched in February. It was no surprise it was suddenly so popular: The app was released just two weeks before New York Fashion Week kicked off, a time when behind-the-scenes runway shots were readily available to capture and share in 6-second loops.

But Vine is much more difficult to make look beautiful and polished than Instagram photos, and brands quickly discovered that to participate, they needed to relax their typically stringent production quality requirements. Perhaps that’s why, following the shows, most fashion houses dropped the platform altogether, only returning to it, in some cases, for the menswear shows in London and Milan earlier this month.

That’s not to say that Vine’s fashion future is dead — it’s merely getting a slow start. Early data indicates that Vine videos are shared four times as often as other kinds of Internet video, and the launch of video for Instagram, which many brands have already enthusiastically adopted, is creating further incentive for fashion firms to ramp up their capabilities and resources in this area.

Let’s take a look at a few fashion brands using Vine to exceptional effect…

Stop motion art

Stop-motion artists are among Vine’s most popular users. Eyeing this trend, French Connection collaborated with photographer Meagan Cignoli to create a series of highly shareable, summer-themed stop-motion videos. In one video, the brand’s latest collection packs itself into a suitcase for a holiday. In another, various outfits are laid out and rolled up on the beach.

Cignoli tells me that each video typically has between 100 and 120 separately recorded clips. The result is incredibly fluid and eye-catching, instantly negating any notion that Vine can’t be a platform for quality creative work. Online retailer Nasty Gal is another standout for stop-motion inspiration, weaving playful, wiggling pieces of candy in and around products like handbags, shoes and makeup. Burberry, too, has used stop-motion video to showcase product prints and patterns, as well as celebrities present at its last menswear show.

Showcasing product details

The beauty of the French Connection work by Cignoli is that it places products front and center, but it’s so creative it doesn’t feel like marketing. Marc Jacobs is another example of a designer who is doing this, releasing some nice stop-motion work that features handbags on what looks like a rotating conveyor belt.

For others, Vine presents an opportunity to demonstrate the work that goes into making products. Matthew Williamson did this during London Fashion Week in February with his #matthewmagnified campaign, and Oscar de la Renta, through the handle OscarPRGirl, used Vine to detail the craftsmanship that goes into its bridalwear pieces.

Gap is also using Vine to highlight key pieces in-store, but takes a more editorial approach, employing models for its videos. In one, a woman spins around in an assortment of dresses. In another, a young girl plays in the latest DVF GapKids collection in the park. These are much more developed than the clips that debuted during fashion week season: a haphazard amalgamation of garments on hangers and poorly lit models on runways.

Injecting personality

Some brands’ Vine videos manage to be both beautifully produced and full of personality.

Urban Outfitters released short videos that are playful yet stylish at the same time. In one clip, a bunch of balloons float into an office. In another, the contents of a purse are being prepared ahead of a festival trip. In another stop-motion video, makeup carries itself into a bag. It’s worth noting that with more than 40,000 followers, Urban Outfitters is one of the most popular brands on Vine, proving that volume and frequency of posts can be a more successful formula than fewer, higher quality videos — as showcased by French Connection, which has just a fraction of Urban Outfitters’ followers.

Behind the scenes

As mentioned, fashion brands released a great deal of behind-the-scenes content on Vine during fashion week season. This is a trend that’s continued since the shows, with brands and retailers providing windows into their corporate headquarters, design studios and individual stores.

Marc Jacobs has used Vine to take followers on many journeys at its headquarters and stores, from the creation of its latest Resort collection campaign to celebrity interviews during in-store book signings. Using the hashtag #staffstyles, Marc Jacobs frequently showcases the prints and patterns worn by its employees. In another example, Bergdorf Goodman features staffers as they try on different pairs of sunglasses. The video is tied to a message about sun protection.

Puma recently released a series of Vine videos featuring Olympic champion Usain Bolt on the set of his latest campaign for the brand. The quick all-access videos, shot again by Cignoli, frequently allow Bolt’s own personality to come through. Meanwhile, Nordstrom has shown what it’s like at its stores after hours, with shoes whimsically moving about on shelves when customers aren’t there. In another video, a flying shirt leads followers on a magical tour through merchandise.

Beyond the obvious

One thing fashion and retail brands haven’t taken advantage of is the how-to video, which is a popular hashtag on Vine. Bergdorfs has done a beauty tutorial and Nordstrom has used Vine to show how to tie a tie, but there are plenty more opportunities here.

As autumn’s busy event calendar gets rolling and the fall collections hit stores, expect to see more behind-the-scenes footage as well as more close-up product shots. Though some brands’ participation has been impeded by corporate approval processes, there’s no doubt — especially with the recent launch of video on Instagram — that short-form video will become a more central part of the fashion industry’s output.

As Cignoli advises: “Fashion brands just need to let go a little and enjoy Vine for what it is, the quickness and easiness of it. If they can find a way to do that, it’s going to be much more beneficial even if what’s going out isn’t always the most amazing piece of content.”

Do you have any favorite fashion brands you follow on Vine?