Categories
Editor's pick film social media

#LiveinLevis campaign returns with Alicia Keys alongside five emerging artists

levis_alicia

Levi’s is profiling five emerging musicians alongside 15-time Grammy award-winner Alicia Keys in the latest iteration of its Live in Levi’s campaign.

At the heart of the initiative, is a dedicated digital destination anchored by a video series called First Steps. Each of the artists – Keys, as well as Kurt Vile, Ibeyi, Benjamin Booker, Kavka Shishido and Ryn Weaver – share their individual stories in these, talking about finding the confidence to take the next steps in their careers.

Created by AKQA, the site also hosts video content that shows how to get the looks of each of the artists. “How-to wear denim on denim,” “How-to make legs look a mile long,” and “How-to do denim on date night,” for instance.

This is the second year of the Live in Levi’s campaign, which has reportedly drawn over one million global visitors and seen 100,000 mentions of its hashtag. It continues for 2015 by encouraging fans to demonstrate how they’re taking their own significant steps in Levi’s. That global user-generated content is also showcased on the website.

Levi's_Booker_0330

The campaign follows the launch of an all-new women’s denim collection from Levi’s featuring Alicia Keys in early July.

“When you are authentically yourself, you are so gorgeous and powerful. I’ve come to the revelation that I’m just a jeans girl at heart. I feel the most confident, comfortable, sexy and strong in my jeans,” says Alicia Keys. “Levi’s is for every woman…there is something for everyone…much like music, Levi’s brings people together from all walks of life and cultures.”

Keys also performs an exclusive song called 28,000 Days as the soundtrack to the campaign:

Categories
e-commerce Editor's pick film social media

Levi’s celebrates stories of a “billion jeans” on new #liveinlevis digital platform

Sandrine_Tonye

Levi’s has launched a digital platform set to host everything from shoppable videos to consumer-generated imagery as part of its new Live in Levi’s global campaign.

Created in partnership with AKQA, the microsite is designed to serve as a living lookbook or a showcase of the brand’s jeans being worn around the world. It will combine storytelling with social media and e-commerce, aiming to engage and activate its global community based on the idea of shared experiences.

“Nearly everyone in the modern world owns, or has owned, a pair of Levi’s jeans,” says Stephen Clements, executive creative director at AKQA. “The global ubiquity of the brand and the diversity of people’s style is what we wanted to celebrate. It’s something no other brand can claim.”

Indeed, the tagline for the campaign reads: “A billion jeans. One-of-a-kind stories. This is how the world lives in Levi’s.”

Anchoring the initiative at launch is an interactive shoppable film. Featuring influencers including Sleigh Bells frontwoman Alexis Krauss, through to street-style star Julia Sarr-Jamois, it invites users to further explore each individual story at any point while watching. Access is then provided to photo galleries, product information, videos and links to shop the look.

“The people who wear Levi’s have always been the inspiration for our brand,” says Jennifer Sey, CMO for the Levi’s brand. “This innovation is a way for us to open up our legacy and invite participation from all over the world by allowing users to shop for iconic Levi’s products highlighted in the film.”

In an earlier interview with The Drum, she explained: “We were inspired by all the letters we receive from consumers and so we just wanted to create and facilitate a space for the stories they are already telling about Levi’s. I would say the three goals of the campaign are to assert the brand’s denim leadership, to tell authentic self-expression, which is really our point of differentiation, and to put the brand back at the centre of culture again as opposed to on the fringe.”

The film was shot in New York, London, Paris, Tokyo and Shanghai in collaboration with editorial and production company, Monster Children.

Fans are invited to contribute to the project with their own Levi’s moments by using the hashtag #LiveInLevis across social platforms. The results will be curated by Levi’s and paired with a relevant product that users can click to buy. A certain level of localisation will also occur as content is created and promoted relevant to specific markets.

liveinlevis1

Julia_Sarr_Jamois

Thomas_Bushnell

Zhu_Jiejing

Himm_Wong

 

Categories
digital snippets e-commerce social media

Digital snippets: Michael Kors, Banana Republic, Macy’s, Kate Spade, John Lewis, L’Oréal, Juicy Couture, Sephora

A short break here means there’s a stack of content to catch up on. Below are the top links for stories surrounding fashion and digital during my recent fortnight of travels. Hours of fun…

MichaelKors_Instagram

  • Michael Kors’ widely hated Instagram ad was actually a massive success; received almost four times as many likes as the average post [Business Insider
  • John Lewis 2013 Christmas ad beats 2012 ad total YouTube views within days of release [The Drum]
  • Banana Republic, CNNMoney and CNBC among top Twitter accounts during TWTR IPO [TechCrunch]
  • Like what you see? Kate Spade video ad designed for instant shopping [Mashable]
  • L’Oréal Paris launches make-up vending machines in NYC subway [Fashionista
  • Juicy Couture to be first brand to advertise using Snapchat Stories [The Drum]
  • At Sephora, mobile-first means ‘connecting’ the customer’s experiences [eMarketer]
  • Neiman Marcus teams up with Shapeways to offer 3D printed holiday capsule collection [PSFK] 
  • Printemps sets e-commerce strategy [WWD
  • Cartier North America CEO stresses importance of carefully curated digital presence [Luxury Daily]
  • How can retailers make it easier to buy jeans online? [Econsultancy]
  • On the same theme: This app can find your true bra size by taking two selfies of your breasts [Business Insider
  • Vanessa Traina launches new curated e-commerce venture The Line [BoF]
  • Fashion bloggers see a missed opportunity to monetise Instagram posts – why aren’t links allowed? [AdWeek
Categories
social media

Warehouse fans go #knitbombing in recent social campaign

Warehouse_knitbombing1

As mentioned in a recent post about the #topmansprayonjeans campaign, there’s a big focus on user-generated content being seen from a multitude of retailers of late.

One of the others referenced in that same story was Warehouse. The UK retailer launched a campaign in late September focused on #knitbombing, a street art craze involving knitted items being placed to decorate public spaces – think trees, bollards even bikes. It’s not a new phenomenon, but it’s one that hasn’t been claimed by a fashion brand before (to my knowledge).

In a nice example of physical meets digital, Warehouse invited its followers to snap photos of their knit-bombing attempts and upload them to Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag. The best would go on to win a £250 gift card.

To help facilitate the campaign, it offered shoppers free knit-bombing kits in-store when they bought certain knitwear items. It also posted a series of inspirational woolly shots of its own across its Facebook and Pinterest pages (a couple of which are above and below).

Read its blogpost about the initiative: “Knit-bombing groups have been springing up everywhere – warming the soul of grey urban spaces with colourful knitted artwork or ‘graffitti’. Obviously we had to share this amazing phenomenon with you.” It also called for participants to “flex some creative muscle; remember the city is your playground.”

According to @Editd, the campaign saw Warehouse’s fanbase grow 10%.

Warehouse_knitbombing2 Warehouse_knitbombing3 Warehouse_knitbombing4

Categories
social media

Topman pulls in consumer content with #topmansprayonjeans campaign

 topman_topmansprayonjeans

User-generated content might be somewhat of an old phrase in the digital space these days, but there’s a phenomenal amount happening around it of late.

From #thenetset at Net-a-Porter to #framesofyou from Armani, as well as multiple other examples via Warehouse, Estée Lauder, Kate Spade and more, everyone is getting in on the act.

The latest is Topman. The men’s arm of the Brit retailer has been pushing its new spray on jeans for the last few weeks using the hashtag #topmansprayonjeans.

Taking full advantage of the #selfie phenomenon, it’s been calling for consumers to send images of themselves wearing the super tight skinny jeans over Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, with the best looks winning Premium Spotify accounts daily.

A series of short videos were released as inspiration for fans on how to get the look. Meanwhile, another fun video was posted today (as below) demonstrating the speed with which it’s possible to put the jeans on.

Reads the write up: “We’ve listened to your feedback and some of you have struggled to get our Spray On Jeans on quickly. We got ours on in 7 secs, how quick can you get yours on?”

Categories
e-commerce social media

Net-a-Porter calls for shopper content with #TheNETSet social campaign

Netaporter_thenetset

The signature black boxes that arrive from Net-a-Porter tied with a grosgain ribbon have long been a favourite for user-generated content. From Instagram images to YouTube haul videos, consumers recurrently share their luxury deliveries and their purchases enclosed inside.

Now, the e-commerce site has started calling for shoppers to do even more so, inviting them to share their photos over Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag #TheNETSet. It’s such an obvious move, it’s almost amazing the company hasn’t done it before.

A month since launch and dozens of images are being shared every day – over 1,500 in total so far according to a tweet from the team on September 27. The best of them are then being curated into a page on the Net-a-Porter site, as well as on some of its other platforms including Pinterest.

It’s also possible to Shop #TheNETSet through a separate page hosting products seen in the crowdsourced content.

This social project arrived in the same month as Net-a-Porter’s bigger announcement of its new social app, The Netbook.