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ICYMI: Mary Meeker’s internet trends, Balenciaga’s t-shirt meme, drones at Walmart

Balenciaga - ICYMI mary meeker internet trends meme
Balenciaga

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Mary Meeker’s 2018 internet trends report: All the slides, plus analysis [Recode]
  • Balenciaga heard you like shirts, so they put a shirt on a t-shirt for $1,300 [Mashable]
  • Walmart’s future may include in-store drone assistants and smart shopping carts [CNBC]
  • How Natalie Massenet’s new VC firm sees the future of retail [Pitchbook]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Blockchain can help authenticate ownership of fashion goods [WWD]
  • Blockchain and beauty go together, according to Tev Finger [WWD]
  • AmEx pilots blockchain-based loyalty rewards with Boxed [RetailDive]
  • Google is actually pretty good at identifying what people are wearing [Racked]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • ‘Need it, text it, get it’: How concierge service Jetblack is aiming to beat Amazon Prime [Glossy]
  • How OPI is hacking Amazon and data algorithms to improve its online site [Glossy]
  • Lululemon hits record high on revamped stores [Reuters]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Snapchat launches its first Lens that reacts to sound [Engadget]
  • How Macy’s is using its store employees and stylists as Instagram influencers to drive sales [Glossy]
PRODUCT
  • ALYX’s Matthew M. Williams reveals data-inspired Nike capsule [HypeBeast]
  • Zac Posen’s new Delta uniforms are the ultimate high-performance outfits [FastCompany]
BUSINESS
  • The Gucci-Gap divide: How luxury is winning the race for millennial spend [BoF]
  • J.Crew will relaunch this fall [Racked]
  • The changing face of fashion PR [BoF]
Categories
Campaigns

Fruit of the Loom combats shirtless selfies in new PSA

Fruit of the Loom
Fruit of the Loom

Fruit of the Loom has released a tongue-in-cheek play on a public service announcement, decrying the spread of men’s shirtless selfies across our social media channels.

“Every 7.3 seconds, a man posts a photo of himself without a shirt,” the ad begins, taking on a sober tone that mimics other such calls for help.

The spot, created by CP+B, goes beyond blaming those in the images for their lack of shirts, however, instead highlighting the fact the lesser quality products they’re choosing are clearly falling apart before men can take a picture in them. The ad cleverly evidences this in the hashtags frequently used to caption the topless shots: #ripped #shredded and #cutup.

It calls for viewers to use the hashtag #putashirton in return, and to help save such individuals from the senseless spread of shirtlessness, by buying them their own Fruit of the Loom tee instead.

On an accompanying webpage – accessed via PutaShirtOn.org, the company explains: “For just the cost of a sandwich, you can help a man in need get his very own Fruit of the Loom Eversoft tee. Thanks to Dual Defense technology, Eversoft doesn’t just protect against odor and moisture, it defends against shirtlessness. Your generosity will keep a man from ever having to take a shirtless selfie again.”

“Every shirtless selfie is a cry for a quality t-shirt,” the commentary around the commercial adds.

Categories
film technology Uncategorized

Lacoste film envisions intelligent polo shirts of the future

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Lacoste is celebrating its 80th birthday and honouring the visionary spirit of its founder, Rene Lacoste, with a video short that highlights how future technology might impact the classic polo shirt.

Created by agency MNSTR, the spot sees the item reinterpreted as an intelligent and dynamic piece of design – one that can change colour to its surroundings, adjust its crocodile logo at the touch of a finger and even add longer length sleeves or better fitting shoulders appropriate to the occasion.

“[It’s] an intelligent polo, a connected polo, one that listens to its environment… a polo with no limits,” reads the write-up.

As though the surface of a tablet or smartphone, the models are seen effortlessly swiping, pinching and adapting various features of the styles they wear throughout. A tennis player keeps score on her front in another frame for instance, while a cyclist turns her horizontal stripes into portrait ones.

And that’s not all… While the spot highlights an “attainable future”, a dedicated microsite at www.lacoste-future.com encourages consumers to imagine “possibilities [that] are endless”. Accordingly, they are invited to send in their own vision of tomorrow’s polo shirt via Facebook.com/Lacoste. The most original and unique ideas will then be featured on that page at a later date.

Appropriately, the initiative launches for December 12, 2012, otherwise known as 12.12.12, which also ties in with the code name Rene Lacoste first gave to the polo shirt in 1933: L.12.12.

You might also like this story: Bloomingdale’s pushes wearable technology with Microsoft Printing Dress for #FNO and this infographic on wearble tech

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