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ICYMI: Chanel announces successor, Amazon scraps Dash buttons, Ted Baker boss steps down

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Virginie Viard to fill Karl Lagerfeld’s brash boots at Chanel [The Times]
  • Amazon stops selling Dash buttons, goofy forerunners of the connected home [CNET]
  • Ted Baker boss Ray Kelvin quits after ‘forced hugging’ claims [The Guardian]
  • Gap to spin off Old Navy into separate public company [Retail Dive]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Apple is releasing a foldable iPhone, and it’s not only about all those patents [Tom’s Guide]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • New York City launches project to promote fashion recycling [Fashion United]
  • Launch of Australasian Circular Textiles Association (ACTA) means business for sustainable fashion [Fashion United]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Harrods targets online growth with Farfetch partnership [The Industry]
  • Ted Baker launches monthly product drops [Fashion United]
  • Pinterest expands the ability to shop on its platform [PYMNTS]
  • J.C. Penney pulls plug on clothing subscription service [BoF]
  • QVC UK introduces social commerce for ‘discovery-led’ shopping [Fashion United]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • New Balance pub only accepts miles ran as currency [TheCurrent Daily]
  • Louis Vuitton unveils digital ‘Postcard’ window displays [WWD]
  • Rebecca Minkoff partners with Yelp to support businesswomen [Fashion United]
  • Ralph Lauren opens Ralph’s Café on Boulevard Saint-Germain in Paris [Fashion Network]
PRODUCT
  • Meet Glossier Play, the new high impact makeup brand from Glossier [WWD]
  • Net-a-Porter teams up with prominent female designers for international women’s day capsule [Fashion United]
  • Bonobos to unveil first women’s capsule [WWD]
  • Target is the latest retailer to take on Victoria’s Secret [Quartz]
BUSINESS
  • Swarovski, CFDA part ways for Fashion Awards [WWD]
  • LVMH plans London hotel and new flagship in experiential push [BoF]
  • Anya Hindmarch to split with partner Mayhoola for investments [WWD]
  • Burberry launches staff training plan after ‘noose’ hoodie row [The Guardian]
  • L Brands to shutter 53 Victoria’s Secret stores [Retail Dive]
  • Puma signs mega global deal with Manchester City owner, its biggest deal ever [Fashion Network]
  • Macy’s new restructuring to cut 100 senior positions, save $100 million annually [Fashion Network]
CULTURE
  • Sesame Street’s turning 50, and InStyle dressed our favorite characters for the party [InStyle]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

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Editor's pick Retail technology

BAFTA awards introduces CGI model as first ever 5G AI-powered red carpet stylist

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) is introducing the world’s first 5G-powered AI stylist at this weekend’s 72nd British Academy Film Awards, in the shape of a hologram of a CGI model. The model will act as a bridge to allow consumers to shop for red carpet looks at home.

Powered by telecoms company EE technology, Shudu, the CGI model, will be brought to life on the red carpet in the shape of a hologram and allow guests at home to shop for evening looks similar to those of the celebrities attending through Instagram Stories.

The experience will work when red carpet guests stand next to the hologram and have their photographs taken by a Google Pixel 3 phone. This is then posted on EE’s Instagram Stories, where users will be able to ‘swipe up’ to begin a conversation with Shudu, the chatbot.

Users can then discuss their personal styles with Shudu, while AI be deployed to find similar, more affordable looks to recommend to users and enable them to “Shop the Look”.

On the red carpet, Shudu will be joined by host and TV presenter Laura Whitmore. “I love the fact that she will give everyone the opportunity to learn more about and even shop the looks of the stars on this year’s BAFTA red carpet right from the comfort of their sofas,” she says. “I know everyone is going to be blown away by her. I’m looking forward to seeing all the glamour and chatting to all the nominees.”

Last year, TheCurrent Global’s Liz Bacelar and Rachel Arthur debated the what the potential that CGI-generated models, such as Shudu, may have for luxury brands on an episode of the Innovators podcast.

How are you thinking about digital innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

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business Editor's pick product sustainability

Circularity is a business imperative, say Swarovski innovation speakers

Circularity is at the heart of the sustainable conversation for any brand that is concerned about its longevity in the industry, said speakers at Swarovski Professional’s Sustainable Innovation event in London.

This is about shifting from the current linear method of production and consumption the industry is focused on, where we take, make and dispose of garments, and instead focusing on a circular economy, whereby all products become resources once again, the panel event, which was curated by TheCurrent, highlighted.

Those involved emphasized the importance of this in the context of population growth estimates. There is expected to be 9.8 billion people on earth by 2050, according to the United Nations, which is contrasted by the fact the planet’s resources are becoming increasingly finite.

Haeckel's Dom Bridges in Margate
Haeckel’s Dom Bridges in Margate

Dom Bridges, founder of beauty brand, Haeckels, said it’s therefore essential to think about only putting something out in the world if the planet really needs it. The core ingredients in his skincare line are based on surplus algae and chalk reef from the beaches of Margate in the UK, making circularity a central focus of his strategy.

Numbers on material waste alone should be enough to spur any company into a more sustainable model, he further noted. Only 1% of the world’s textiles are currently recycled back into the system, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, for instance.

That means 99% of what we are all wearing is waste, explained Claire Bergkamp, worldwide director of sustainability and innovation at Stella McCartney, adding that the industry has yet to build a system to successfully recycle product waste.

Stella McCartney has worked with Bolt Threads to launch a mushroom leather handbag
Stella McCartney has worked with Bolt Threads to launch a mushroom leather handbag

In spite of this, she noted that recycling alone is not going to save us. “Single-use” was recently named the word of the year by Collins Dictionary, off the back of rising public concern surrounding the environmental impact of throwaway plastics. Bergkamp accordingly emphasised that across any industry, we have to move away from designing things that are meant to eventually be disposed of.

This is something that is central to the H&M Group’s sustainability goals. It has outlined ambitions to only use sustainably sourced materials by 2030 and to be climate positive throughout the entire value chain by 2040, which ensures its suppliers also take responsibility. “When we set our sustainability goals, we didn’t know how we were going to get there,” said Nina Shariati, the transparency and innovation business expert within the H&M Group’s sustainability department. “But we didn’t set out those goals because we knew we would reach them, we set them because we had to.”

The pressure is on for all brands to become greener in how they manage their environmental footprint, and fairer throughout their supply chains, said Dax Lovegrove, Global Vice President of Corporate Responsibility at Swarovski.

Today, a third of the energy used at Swarovski’s Austrian production facility comes from renewable energy, while 70% of the water used in crystal making comes from recycled sources. It is also in the process of assessing the environmental impact of its crystals and raw ingredients, which will be disclosed in early 2019.

How are you thinking about sustainability? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Campaigns Events Retail technology

Swarovski celebrates the holidays with sparkle-themed activations

Swarovski's "Sparkling Box
Swarovski’s “Sparkling Box” in Covent Garden

Swarovski is launching a host of interactive experiences in the UK, hoping to spread delight in the run-up to Christmas.

The “Sparkling Box” activation, which popped up at London’s Covent Garden area last week, features a giant box where each façade offers a different digitally-enabled experience for passersby. It includes a GIF photobooth encouraging customers to take a photo and share on social media;  an interactive wall featuring a virtual snowscape that showers visitors in digital snowflakes; a video showing the jewelry brand’s Christmas advert; and a guide for Swarovski’s must-have gifts for the festive season.

The box is set to tour the UK over the coming weeks, appearing in Manchester next, followed by Glasgow and Birmingham.

In keeping with the sparkle theme, Swarovski is also set to launch “Sparkle Street” at London’s Westfield White City mall location, which will feature a Christmas tree accompanied by digital advertising, creating a festive landscape for visitors to take pictures in front of that will then be shown on a large screen opposite the installation.

Lastly, the brand is also teaming up with a team of black cab drivers in the city, who will be handing out Swarovski gifts to lucky passengers throughout December. 

Brands are increasingly diversifying the way they celebrate special events throughout the year with activations that aim to surprise & delight unassuming shoppers. Last week, Harvey Nichols visited London offices with a very special musical performance, while allowing consumers to buy the festive clothes the choir was wearing on the day directly on Instagram.

Are you thinking innovatively enough in your brand messaging? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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business Campaigns digital snippets Editor's pick film product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Industry faces its #MeToo moment, tech hits Olympics, Vogue and Amazon Echo Look

Tom Ford - ICYMI #metoo metoo fashion week
Tom Ford

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • New York Fashion Week: industry faces its #MeToo moment [TheGuardian]
  • Can an app launch the fashion world’s #metoo reckoning? [Vanity Fair]
  • Olympic clothing designers try to beat the cold with technology [Scientific American]
  • Vogue and GQ will test content inside Amazon’s Echo Look [Digiday]
  • Can Christian Louboutin trademark red soles? An EU court says no [NY Times]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Intel unveils smart glasses that you might want to wear [Engadget]
  • Walmart’s tech incubator buys VR startup Spatialand [Reuters]
  • Opinion: Blockchain technology will make true luxury more lucrative [JingDaily]
  • JD.com and Fung align for AI development [RetailDive]
  • Asics Ventures invests in conductivity textiles [FashionUnited]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • Eileen Fisher, Columbus Consulting reveal details for sustainable design plan [WWD]
  • Primark publishes global supplier map showing all of its factories [TheIndustry]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Target CEO: Our personal shoppers will deliver to ‘your kitchen table’ [CNBC]
  • Macy’s plans pop-ups to amplify discovery [RetailDive]
  • Malls are dying, but things remembered is still hanging on [Racked]
  • Tips from the e-commerce giant Zalando [Maize]
MARKETING
  • Benjamin Millepied directs Ansel Elgort and Kate Mara in a mesmerizing film for Rag & Bone [CreativityOnline]
  • Nike rolls out NikePlus membership benefits [WWD]
  • Asics personal trainers will kick your butt as you use its fitness app [CreativityOnline]
SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Instagram entices brands with new shopping-enabled ads [TheDrum]
  • Pinterest sees 600 million visual searches every month [VentureBeat]
  • Swarovski and KiraKira+ launch fashion week ‘brilliance’ filter [WWD]
PRODUCT
  • UA HOVR, ushering in a new chapter of sneaker tech innovation [FashNerd]
BUSINESS
  • Canada Goose craze continues as shoppers flock to new stores [BoF]
  • British designer Misha Nonoo is rewriting fashion’s playbook [FastCompany]
  • The cautionary tale of H&M and digital disruption [BoF]
  • LVMH Luxury Ventures backs Stadium Goods [WWD]
  • Tapestry shares rise after earnings beat expectations [BoF]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce product social media Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: Tim Cook on AR for fashion, the future of visual search, open sustainability

Apple CEO Tim Cook on the future of AR for fashion
Apple CEO Tim Cook

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past week.


TOP STORIES
  • Apple’s Tim Cook on the future of fashion and shopping [Vogue]
  • Retailers continue to experiment with visual search [Glossy]
  • Fashion needs an open-source sustainability solution [BoF]
  • Alibaba to spend $15 billion exploring ‘moonshot’ projects [Bloomberg]

BUSINESS
  • Giorgio Armani speaks on restructuring and succession plans [BoF]
  • Coach is changing its name to Tapestry [Bloomberg]
  • How Supreme grew a $1 billion business with a secret partner [BoF]

SOCIAL MEDIA & MARKETING
  • Fashion week engagements on Instagram nearly tripled compared to February’s fashion month [AdWeek]
  • Snapchat is twice as popular as Instagram when it comes to teens’ favourite social apps [AdWeek]
  • Will Dove’s ‘Pepsi moment’ affect the brand in the long term? [The Drum]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Walmart and Target are banding with Google to take on Amazon [AdWeek]
  • Black Friday shoppers more likely than ever to go online this year [Retail Dive]
  • ASOS launches same-day delivery service [The Industry]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Mastercard offers first checkout option for VR with Swarovski [AdAge]
  • What Sephora knows about women in tech that Silicon Valley doesn’t [WSJ]
  • Marie Claire and Mastercard showcase the future of shopping [BrandChannel]

PRODUCT
  • What goes into making an earth-friendly $68 pair of jeans at Everlane [Bloomberg]
  • Spider silk and stem-cell leather are the future of fashion [Engadget]
  • Stella McCartney is pioneering synthetic spider silk in high fashion [QZ]
  • Kering announces 2017 sustainable winners [FashionUnited]

START-UPS
  • With the launch of a lower-price subscription service, how Rent the Runway’s ‘closet in the cloud’ is changing the face of sustainability [Fashionista]
  • Digital closet start-ups want to give you the Cher Horowitz experience [Racked]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce film social media sustainability technology

What you missed: Amazon didn’t kill Macy’s, Alibaba’s anti-counterfeiting bid, LVMH on sustainability

Macy's Amazon
Who really killed Macy’s?

So is Amazon the big threat to retail, or do retailers really have themselves to blame? There’s a great piece from Recode exploring the longer-term demise of Macy’s. No surprise to also see Neiman Marcus’ IPO has been stalled given current market conditions. The Limited is another US store announcing its closure over the past week.

Meanwhile, other big news to know about include a bid to fight counterfeit goods on Alibaba, PETA aiming to disrupt LVMH from the inside (as well as a separate piece on how LVMH is making luxury more sustainable), and yet more advertising updates on both Instagram and Snapchat. If you haven’t seen it, don’t forget to also check out our list of the 8 top tech trends for fashion and luxury retail in 2017.


TOP STORIES
  • Amazon didn’t kill Macy’s. Macy’s did [Recode]
  • Alibaba forms anti-counterfeiting alliance with Louis Vuitton, Swarovski and others [WWD]
  • Bernard Arnault meets with President-Elect Donald Trump [WWD]
  • What happens when beauty, health and wellness products move from standardised to personalised? [Loose Threads]
  • These stores smell money inside your brain [Bloomberg]

BUSINESS
  • Neiman Marcus IPO will stay on the shelf [Bloomberg]
  • PETA is now a Louis Vuitton shareholder [Fashionista]
  • An inside view of how LVMH makes luxury more sustainable [HBR]
  • Diane von Furstenberg debuts hip new logo, website ahead of fashion month [Fashionista]
  • Expect experimental evolution, not revolution, at Valentino [BoF]
  • Jimmy Choo co-founder goes stiletto-first into the digital future [Fast Company]
  • Lessons learned from Neil Blumenthal, the co-founder and co-CEO of Warby Parker [AlleyWatch]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Asos, Nike and Airbnb first to use Instagram Stories’ new ad formats [The Drum]
  • Snapchat is about to get a major redesign – including search bar [Mashable]
  • L’Oréal Paris brought Snapchat Spectacles to the red carpet for the Golden Globes [Digiday]

MARKETING
  • Sephora is ramping up its mission to empower women in 2017 via sustainability and technology [Fashionista]
  • Nike Women got FKA Twigs to creative direct this mesmerising new ad [AdWeek]
  • Film student’s emotional Adidas ad goes viral as viewers urge the brand to take notice [The Drum]
  • Chopard explains etiquette for 21st-century man in whimsical vignettes [Luxury Daily]

RETAIL
  • The Limited officially closes all stores, moves online [Retail Dive]
  • Matches CEO: Customers want speed and convenience [CNBC]
  • Lush evolves digital offerings to better connect with consumers [Glossy]
  • Kohl’s continued digital innovation drives loyalty [RIS News]

TECHNOLOGY
  • From gimmick to game-changer: How virtual reality will alter the fashion industry [Glossy]
  • Tanvas’ haptic feedback system lets you feel texture on a touchscreen [The Verge]
Categories
business digital snippets mobile social media Startups technology

What you missed: endangered fashion unicorns, Dior’s YouTube moves, Facebook marketplace

fashion unicorns
Fashion ‘unicorns’ have become an endangered species

This week’s round-up of relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech news neatly sums up a series of things to be tracking at present: the evolution of social media businesses into greater advertising and commercial retail opportunities, the role customer service and messaging apps play together, the explosion of all things virtual and augmented reality, and an ongoing bevy of start-ups to know about.

Meanwhile, also worth reading this week is detail on David Lauren’s promotion to the role of chief innovation officer over at Ralph Lauren, Dior’s catch up strategy on YouTube, and the growth of physical stores by online players including Warby Parker and Bonobos.


TOP STORIES
  • Fashion ‘unicorns’ have become an endangered species [BoF]
  • Dior’s borrowing Chanel’s strategies to catch up on YouTube [Glossy]
  • Mastercard launches ‘selfie pay’ [FT]

BUSINESS
  • LVMH to buy majority stake in Germany’s Rimowa for $716 million [BoF]
  • Swarovski, maker of all things bejewelled, refashions itself as a tech company [NY Times]
  • As their incomes rise, Chinese consumers are trading up and going beyond necessities [McKinsey]
  • Ralph Lauren promotes founder’s son to chief innovation officer [Bloomberg]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Facebook launches Marketplace for local buying and selling [Reuters]
  • For young brands, is the Instagram opportunity shrinking? [BoF]
  • Pinterest Promoted Video lands in the UK with Hunter on board as a partner [The Drum]
  • Snapchat users are spending 78 seconds on average playing Under Armour’s Cam Newton game [AdWeek]
  • An inside look at Snapchat’s new advertising API technology [AdAge]

ADVERTISING
  • Reebok adds Gigi Hadid to #PerfectNever campaign [MediaPost]
  • Farfetch inspires consumers to find the perfect product in new #TheOne campaign [Luxury Daily]
  • Google, Facebook become focus of holiday digital campaigns [MediaPost]

RETAIL
  • Warby Parker, Bonobos have big plans for physical stores [WSJ]
  • Shopify adds Facebook Messenger direct sales channel [Retail Dive]
  • Salesforce launches LiveMessage to provide customer service across messaging apps [VentureBeat]
  • Cocktails, cinemas and concierges: Malls weave a web of their own to entice customers [Financial Post]
  • Now you can sign up for a “.shopping” domain name [Apparel]
  • The Outnet launches first android app [Fashion United]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Japanese brand Anrealage hosts augmented reality fashion show [Glossy]
  • Mark Zuckerberg’s VR selfie is a bigger deal than you realise [Wired]
  • Will Google’s ‘soft and cozy’ approach to VR headsets make the space more mainstream? [AdWeek]
  • The mainstreaming of augmented reality: a brief history [HBR]

START-UPS
  • Venture capitalists invest $56 billion in start-ups so far in 2016 [Reuters]
  • New app co-created by Elon Musk’s estranged wife could be a game-changer for retail [BGR]
  • Online fashion retailer Grana raises $10M led by Alibaba’s entrepreneurship fund [TechCrunch]
Categories
Comment Editor's pick technology

CES 2015: Wearable technology was the biggest let down

This piece first appeared on The Telegraph

Every year Rachel Arthur, a technology and fashion writer, makes a pilgrimage to Las Vegas in the hope that the technology industry will have finally produced some stunning wearables to show off at CES. Why is she perennially disappointed?

withings_activitepop

Let me share my favourite fact about CES, the famous Consumer Electronics Show held in Las Vegas every year: the amount of space dedicated to showing off technology is the equivalent of 38 football fields.

The vastness is overwhelming . Every January fear hits me anew, as I make my annual pilgrimage to this fizzing temple of innovation, alongside thousands of other eager beavers.

Wearable technology was firmly on CES 2015’s agenda, secured by the announcement of the Apple Watch, not to mention numerous other releases and collaborations from the industry during 2014. Duly – ‘wearables’ as they are known in the trade, were given pride of place at this year’s show.

However, despite the hype, these gizmos disappointingly failed to deliver for another year. Designs are still clunky and basic functionality of most attempts remain unchanged. In short, what we’ve got is a series of “me too” devices – items that match in both what they look like and do. Yes there are a handful of designs certainly more geared towards women than in 2014, which is perhaps the most positive takeaway from all this, but even those aren’t overly worth shouting about.

So why hasn’t the wearables sector made good on its early promise?

Tom Goodwin, SVP of strategy and innovation at Havas Media, says the issue comes down to the industry pushing out what it’s easily possible to produce, rather than looking to creative types to explore human needs and desires. “We’re seeing a lot of devices that look similar and perform similar functions,” he explained. “Wearables should be designed with consumer behaviour in mind, catering to an unmet human need and utilising a unique technology – but I haven’t seen many examples of this at CES this year. It feels companies are hurriedly jumping into the space quickly to steal a march on Apple.”

Indeed, nestled in the back corner of the trade show a Chinese business was spied selling a fake but functional version of the Apple Watch for just $27, according to tech site Mashable.

Fakes aside, the smart watch continued to dominate. As a category, there’s huge belief in this category. But does anyone want one?

Buoyed heavily by Apple’s pending release, they’re expected to see growth of 358 per cent to a total of 10.8m sales in the US from 2014 to 2015, according to the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA).

smartwatch

However, the overall feeling amongst the experts is that there’s little differentiation out there in terms of innovation between brands – whether it’s from Samsung, Motorola or Sony, or indeed some of the lesser-known names on show like Burg Wearables, Wellograph and MyKronoz. All of them offer clunky watches that frankly aren’t great to look at or grace the wrist.

Design should be an easy win these days – especially with sensors becoming smaller and more affordable, and battery life lasting longer. Yet, the floor at CES was still full of big ugly styles; styles at the worst end of the scale you couldn’t imagine many men wearing, let alone women.

Arguably there’s an expectation that a watch should look like a watch, therefore it’s inevitable many releases will be aesthetically similar. From a traditional watch perspective, subtle finishes are always the differentiators – but many of these “smart” variations still look like boxes housing technology, rather than specimens of high quality design.

This deficit leaves an enormous gap for the likes of Tag Heuer, rumoured to be considering working on its first wearable for release at the end of this year at the earliest, to swoop in. In a noteworthy move, interim chief executives Jean-Claude Biver, recently said: “We will only make smart watches if we are the best, different and unique.”

In the meantime, there were a handful of exceptions at CES this year beginning to prove there’s some hope for this section of the wearables market.

Guess for instance, has teamed up with Martian Watches to launch a smart watch for men and women, both of which look great. They alert wearers to calls and texts and enable voice command for replies.

Withings also released its new Activité Pop – a cheaper version of its original analogue-looking activity tracker with much of the same charm and a variety of different colourways to choose from (aka not just pink for women).

Also for women, comes the new collaboration between Swarovski and Misfit. Housing the Misfit Shine activity-tracking device within a faceted crystal, this one is accompanied by a nine-piece jewellery collection to alternate how it’s worn, including pendants, bracelets and watchstraps.

Fitness tracking and communications are the main two offerings of all smart wrist garb – regardless of design. So count your steps and measure your heart rate on the one hand, or receive text messages and make calls on the other.

To be fair, we are still very early on in the world of wearable technology. As Goodwin says, this means we are still waiting for a killer use case. For him wearables will need to step beyond these basic functions and integrate with the Internet of Things, a broader trend that dominated CES again this year, (based on everyday objects being digitally connected around us).

“When wearables allow us to pay for things, control the lighting in our homes, get into our cars, locate where our kids are, that’s when things get more interesting,” he notes.

In short, the industry needs to stop relying on a mentality of “me too” and start genuinely innovating. CES should be the place that big corporations, alongside start-ups, are chomping at the bit to showcase something that genuinely screams “new” and appeals to normal people – instead of simply playing catch-up with competitors.

Otherwise what’s the point of traipsing around 38 football fields if all the innovation is still nowhere near the pitch?

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film Uncategorized

Matthew Williamson celebrates 15th anniversary with enchanting short film

 

British designer Matthew Williamson launched a short film yesterday to celebrate his 15-years in the industry.

“XV” stars Sienna Milller, Poppy Delevingne and Andrea Riseborough, as well as eight ballerinas from the Royal Ballet and even a unicorn. Shot at Aynhoe Park, a 17th century country house in Oxfordshire, it’s a beautiful spin inside the colourful, ethereal and imaginative world of Williamson’s own mind.

The plot (scripted by Mark Whelan) follows Williamson’s dreams as a 15-year old boy lying in bed on a school morning before his Mum (Riseborough) calls up the stairs to wake him.

It was directed by Tell No One’s Luke White and Remi Weekes, with the ballerinas choreographed by Random Dance company’s Wayne McGregor.

Williamson has also created a limited edition collection in collaboration with Swarovski for the occasion, seen worn by Miller, Delevingne and ballerina Melissa Hamilton in the film. It is otherwise available to buy exclusively at Net-a-Porter.com and the designer’s London store.

Below are a selection of behind-the-scenes images from the film, as well as a making-of video featuring interviews with the stars.