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e-commerce Editor's pick

Jeremy Scott’s missed opportunity in ‘unshoppable’ Katy Perry Super Bowl XLIX collection

KatyPerry_sharks

One of the great add-ons to Katy Perry’s performance during last night’s Super Bowl was the fact limited edition merchandise was instantly made shoppable to those viewing via Twitter, YouTube, Shazam and connected TV devices from Samsung, LG and Roku.

According to Variety, the deal was established between Universal Music Group and halftime show sponsor Pepsi. It was powered by San Francisco-based interactive commerce provider Delivery Agent, with Visa as the exclusive payment service.

When the star hit the field kitted out head-to-toe in Jeremy Scott, you’d be forgiven for thinking this great shoppable integration was about to involve him too. I certainly did.

Head over to Forbes for insight into why Scott not being involved (especially given his experience producing Moschino collections immediately made available for purchase) was a huge missed opportunity.

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Editor's pick film social media

#SuperBowlXLIX: Victoria’s Secret, Foot Locker, Kenneth Cole were social’s retail winners

VictoriasSecret

Victoria’s Secret was the big ‘retail’ name going in to this year’s Super Bowl. Its teaser spot featuring the Angels playing football gained nearly two million views ahead of time, while the commercial it actually aired during the fourth quarter (as below) followed closely behind with 1.2 million.

It was a smart move by the brand; a bid to build awareness a mere two weeks before Valentine’s Day – needless to say one of its most important sales periods.

It backed the spot with a strong Twitter strategy; engaging with fans throughout the game with comments and replies, as well as tweeting during play with thoughts on Katy Perry’s halftime show, as well as the launch of an exclusive flash sale.

Multiple other retailers did the same however, and without the rumoured $4.5m it costs per 30-second commercial spot. While it was a less creative year than in 2013, which saw Calvin Klein’s live Vine posts, or in 2014 with JC Penney’s spoof typos, there was a noteworthy ongoing bid for real-time marketing.

Kenneth Cole was one of the strongest, with both the brand and the designer’s own account tweeting about some of the other ads being shown during the game, Katy Perry’s show again, and things like how much everyone is likely to eat throughout.

Sears meanwhile was all about the game itself – tweeting on the play from the Seattle Seahawks and the New England Patriots, the latter of which went on to win.

Alex and Ani followed suit, adding some cute Vine videos to congratulate the teams on their touchdowns, which simultaneously showcased product. Like Kenneth Cole, further tweets posted related to the other brands featured in the ad breaks.

Foot Locker was another retailer that did have an official ad in the commercial break, but simultaneously won on social thanks to the fact Seattle Seahawks’ player Chris Matthews was a former employee.

While the company did tweet a couple of times about said fact – especially after the wide receiver helped tie the game two seconds before the end of the first half – it was the commentators on NBC, not to mention publications like AdWeek that truly due attention to it. “By the second half, “Foot Locker” was trending on Twitter, as well, making the sneaker shop perhaps the big winner among non-Super Bowl brands looking to make marketing hay during advertising’s biggest day of the year,” it wrote.

It might not be a viral win like Oreo had in 2013, but it was a marketing stroke of luck that might be one of the most memorable outside of the big ad spenders this year.

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data digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups

Digital snippets: Gap, H&M, L’Oréal, Dove, Lyst, Jelly

Here’s a highlight of the best stories in the fashion and tech space over the past week…

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  • You can now pin animated GIFs: here’s Gap’s (as pictured) [Fashionista]
  • Will David Beckham’s H&M Super Bowl ad be #covered or #uncovered? [Fashionotes]
  • L’Oréal’s Matrix offers stylist’s-eye view with Google Glass [BrandChannel]
  • Dove launches short film, “Selfie”, about women’s self-image at Sundance [Creativity]
  • Meet the stylish Sapeurs, the Congolese stars of Guinness’ new ad and doc [Co.Create]
  • Why Amazon’s data store doesn’t scare people, but Facebook’s does [AdAge]
  • Lyst, a fashion e-commerce aggregator, raises $14m more, plans beacon rollout with PayPal [TechCrunch]
  • Keep.com helps you shop for items on Instagram [Mashable]
  • Nine unexpected ways retailers are using your data [Fashionista]
  • Vogue hosts its first Google+ Hangout celebrating The Fashion Fund [Vogue]
Categories
social media Uncategorized

Take a look at Calvin Klein’s Vine posts during Super Bowl XLVII

As promised, Calvin Klein made use of Twitter’s new video-sharing app, Vine, during the Super Bowl last night.

Designed to support the premier of its Calvin Klein Concept men’s underwear campaign during the first quarter of the game, the six-second Vine content consisted of various different shots of model Matthew Terry working out in his boxers.

What was clever was the simple Super Bowl-themed copy that accompanied – “Game time”, “Fighting it out in the 4th”, and “Touchdown” included. So too was there a nice use of #SuperBowl and #SB47 hashtags throughout.

Below is a selection of them. Scroll to the bottom for the full ad too…

Categories
film social media Uncategorized

New Twitter app Vine to support Calvin Klein’s first Super Bowl ad, other brands experiment

 

It’s likely you’ve heard the news that Calvin Klein is launching its first ever Super Bowl campaign this coming weekend.

The 30-second spot for the brand’s latest men’s underwear offering will debut towards the end of the first quarter of the game on Sunday evening. It sees model Matthew Terry shot by creative director Fabien Baron of Baron + Baron, in a provocative commercial based on the idea of “man versus machine” (see above preview).

What’s particularly interesting however is the idea that the campaign will be supported with activity on Twitter’s new video-sharing app, Vine. According to a statement, digital content will be posted throughout the event on this new app, which allows six-second videos to be played on loop, much like animated GIFs. The news follows a variety of experiments on the platform by other brands, including Gap and Urban Outfitters (as below).

Like other social platforms before it – such as Instagram – the instant beauty of Vine has been the room for experimentation it affords brands both big and small. Take British start-up Olivia Burton watches, for instance – it’s been having a play with content this week to great effect. A simple series of product shots captured on a black and white photographic background, portray an incredibly high quality and on-brand message.

Calvin Klein will no doubt achieve the same. The next question, of course, will be how all they’re received by consumers.

Back to the Super Bowl, and Calvin Klein is also planning to push relevant content across its Facebook, Tumblr and YouTube pages on game day.

“We are a brand with a rich advertising legacy and we firmly believe in powerful, multi-platform lifestyle advertising to support and grow the brand’s image around the world,” said Tom Murry, president and CEO of Calvin Klein, Inc. “This is a significant milestone, and, as an iconic American designer brand, we are extremely proud to be able to debut the latest Calvin Klein Underwear campaign during the Super Bowl – the most watched television event annually in the United States.”

According to Nielsen, the 2012 Super Bowl had 111 million viewers, making it the most-watched television program in US history. Another interesting study showed as many as 40% of this year’s viewers are watching for the ads rather than the sport.

The Calvin Klein spot will also be included in Twitter’s #AdScrimmage and YouTube’s Ad Blitz contests for the best Super Bowl XLVII ads as voted for by fans.

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