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digital snippets e-commerce film mobile

Digital snippets: Macy’s, Margiela, Farfetch, Longchamp, Versace, Polo Ralph Lauren

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

Macy's Reports Strong Quarterly Earnings

  • Macy’s aims to become retail tech powerhouse with latest moves [Fortune]
  • Maison Martin Margiela reveals 8-chapter cryptic film [Dazed Digital]
  • Farfetch launches new Discover app: a shoppable tour guide to the world’s most fashionable cities [Co.Design]
  • Made in Britain denim brand Hiut Denim Co pushes boundaries of consumer interaction with new window “hack” installation [WGSN blogs]
  • Alexa Chung reads her own book in new Longchamp video [Fashionista]
  • Versace embeds instant e-commerce in runway show livestream [Luxury Daily]
  • How 3D printing will impact our future: A rundown of companies to keep your eyes on [TheNextWeb]
  • Could Apple Pay kill the traditional wallet? [AdAge]
  • Top 10 stop-motion artists doing brilliant work for brands on Vine [AdWeek]
  • To pay or not to pay: major survey reveals what bloggers expect from brands [Marketing Magazine]
Categories
Editor's pick film

Butterflies converge in new Valentino film

valentino_camubutterfly

Valentino has launched a short stop-motion animation film called Camubutterfly that encapsulates its pre-fall 2014 collection.

Directed by Virgilio Villoresi, and produced by Withstand for Brw, the 45-second spot sees dozens of paper butterflies fluttering together to create pieces from the new line, including a coat, clutch, dress, shoes and more.

Vogue Paris refers to it as mesmerising, and rightly so as each item appears camouflaged against the butterfly background that also remains behind.

The video was shared to the Valentino Facebook page with the caption: “A kaleidoscope of butterflies”.

A further post, read: “Hidden in each colorful butterfly image is an even more colorful and unique Camubutterfly print item of clothing. Look very closely and you will slowly see appear in front of your very eyes dresses, coats and pants hidden in the print. This unique butterfly motif has been exclusively designed for the Maison and has been applied to feathers, brocade, macramè, organza, chiffon and even neoprene. Who needs monotone when you can have Camubutterfly print?”

Categories
social media

Another great fashion Vine using stop motion

In case you haven’t already spotted it, here’s one of the most genius Vine videos I’ve seen for the fashion industry yet:

It was created by one of Twitter’s own video producers, Ian Padgham, and nicely plays on the idea of models as dolls; moving, flicking and capturing them as they walk down the catwalk with his own fingertips in a clever form of stop motion animation.

Here’s another great post of his, this time moving the clock hands of Big Ben in London.

Check out my post on How fashion brands are using Vine over at Mashable otherwise for more.

Categories
film social media

How fashion brands are using Vine

This article first appeared on Mashable

Fashionbrands_Vine

The fashion industry immediately embraced Vine, Twitter’s 6-second video app, after it launched in February. It was no surprise it was suddenly so popular: The app was released just two weeks before New York Fashion Week kicked off, a time when behind-the-scenes runway shots were readily available to capture and share in 6-second loops.

But Vine is much more difficult to make look beautiful and polished than Instagram photos, and brands quickly discovered that to participate, they needed to relax their typically stringent production quality requirements. Perhaps that’s why, following the shows, most fashion houses dropped the platform altogether, only returning to it, in some cases, for the menswear shows in London and Milan earlier this month.

That’s not to say that Vine’s fashion future is dead — it’s merely getting a slow start. Early data indicates that Vine videos are shared four times as often as other kinds of Internet video, and the launch of video for Instagram, which many brands have already enthusiastically adopted, is creating further incentive for fashion firms to ramp up their capabilities and resources in this area.

Let’s take a look at a few fashion brands using Vine to exceptional effect…

Stop motion art

Stop-motion artists are among Vine’s most popular users. Eyeing this trend, French Connection collaborated with photographer Meagan Cignoli to create a series of highly shareable, summer-themed stop-motion videos. In one video, the brand’s latest collection packs itself into a suitcase for a holiday. In another, various outfits are laid out and rolled up on the beach.

Cignoli tells me that each video typically has between 100 and 120 separately recorded clips. The result is incredibly fluid and eye-catching, instantly negating any notion that Vine can’t be a platform for quality creative work. Online retailer Nasty Gal is another standout for stop-motion inspiration, weaving playful, wiggling pieces of candy in and around products like handbags, shoes and makeup. Burberry, too, has used stop-motion video to showcase product prints and patterns, as well as celebrities present at its last menswear show.

Showcasing product details

The beauty of the French Connection work by Cignoli is that it places products front and center, but it’s so creative it doesn’t feel like marketing. Marc Jacobs is another example of a designer who is doing this, releasing some nice stop-motion work that features handbags on what looks like a rotating conveyor belt.

For others, Vine presents an opportunity to demonstrate the work that goes into making products. Matthew Williamson did this during London Fashion Week in February with his #matthewmagnified campaign, and Oscar de la Renta, through the handle OscarPRGirl, used Vine to detail the craftsmanship that goes into its bridalwear pieces.

Gap is also using Vine to highlight key pieces in-store, but takes a more editorial approach, employing models for its videos. In one, a woman spins around in an assortment of dresses. In another, a young girl plays in the latest DVF GapKids collection in the park. These are much more developed than the clips that debuted during fashion week season: a haphazard amalgamation of garments on hangers and poorly lit models on runways.

Injecting personality

Some brands’ Vine videos manage to be both beautifully produced and full of personality.

Urban Outfitters released short videos that are playful yet stylish at the same time. In one clip, a bunch of balloons float into an office. In another, the contents of a purse are being prepared ahead of a festival trip. In another stop-motion video, makeup carries itself into a bag. It’s worth noting that with more than 40,000 followers, Urban Outfitters is one of the most popular brands on Vine, proving that volume and frequency of posts can be a more successful formula than fewer, higher quality videos — as showcased by French Connection, which has just a fraction of Urban Outfitters’ followers.

Behind the scenes

As mentioned, fashion brands released a great deal of behind-the-scenes content on Vine during fashion week season. This is a trend that’s continued since the shows, with brands and retailers providing windows into their corporate headquarters, design studios and individual stores.

Marc Jacobs has used Vine to take followers on many journeys at its headquarters and stores, from the creation of its latest Resort collection campaign to celebrity interviews during in-store book signings. Using the hashtag #staffstyles, Marc Jacobs frequently showcases the prints and patterns worn by its employees. In another example, Bergdorf Goodman features staffers as they try on different pairs of sunglasses. The video is tied to a message about sun protection.

Puma recently released a series of Vine videos featuring Olympic champion Usain Bolt on the set of his latest campaign for the brand. The quick all-access videos, shot again by Cignoli, frequently allow Bolt’s own personality to come through. Meanwhile, Nordstrom has shown what it’s like at its stores after hours, with shoes whimsically moving about on shelves when customers aren’t there. In another video, a flying shirt leads followers on a magical tour through merchandise.

Beyond the obvious

One thing fashion and retail brands haven’t taken advantage of is the how-to video, which is a popular hashtag on Vine. Bergdorfs has done a beauty tutorial and Nordstrom has used Vine to show how to tie a tie, but there are plenty more opportunities here.

As autumn’s busy event calendar gets rolling and the fall collections hit stores, expect to see more behind-the-scenes footage as well as more close-up product shots. Though some brands’ participation has been impeded by corporate approval processes, there’s no doubt — especially with the recent launch of video on Instagram — that short-form video will become a more central part of the fashion industry’s output.

As Cignoli advises: “Fashion brands just need to let go a little and enjoy Vine for what it is, the quickness and easiness of it. If they can find a way to do that, it’s going to be much more beneficial even if what’s going out isn’t always the most amazing piece of content.”

Do you have any favorite fashion brands you follow on Vine?

Categories
film Uncategorized

Hermès opts for playful with sports-themed stop motion campaign films

If there’s one way to bring a touch of character to a French luxury house, it’s with a series of stop-motion animated films filled with nothing but props and accessories.

Enter then Hermès, which has released a total of four short spots featuring classic items from the company (scarves, ties, homeware) alongside sports-themed equipment that comes to life to beautifully show off the eccentric, playful and quirky nature of the brand.

China plates play ping pong while handbags spectate for instance (as above), or pairs of shoes are seen emerging from a picnic basket and leapfrogging one another (as below). The croquet spot then features silk ties coiling into hoops through which the balls travel, and in “No Sport”, pétanque balls are seen delicately snoozing on cushions under a tree (both also below).

The films were directed by Simon Cahn and are part of the brand’s spring/summer 2013 “Long Live Sport” campaign.

An interactive segment of the Hermès website has also been released, which invites users to navigate an illustrated garden map to find the sporting activity, and accordingly the video, of their choice.

 

 

 

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