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Gucci employs VR and AR experiences for spring campaign

Gucci SS18 campaign
Gucci SS18 campaign

Gucci has introduced a new digital campaign for spring 2018, featuring scannable ads, as well as augmented and virtual reality experiences.

The campaign began with a film called ‘Gucci Hallucination’, in  which the artist Ignasi Monreal, whose work is the basis of the campaign, stars as the curator of the Gucci gallery. The story sees him stepping into one of his paintings to reveal the details of a gold sequin Gucci dress worn by its inhabitant.

The Spanish artist’s surreal work now features as the backdrop to interactive store window displays, which feature animated digital illustrations. His pieces also then feature as scannable stickers on the windows that provide access to a microsite where content including downloadable wallpaper, a catalogue of Gucci products and the Monreal illustrations can be accessed.

Gucci's SS18 campaign in-store
Gucci’s SS18 campaign in-store

At 52 selected Gucci stores, customers will also receive Monreal’s artwork in the form of tickets with their purchases. This then gives them access to VR devices, which show a 360-degree panorama of Monreal’s campaign artwork.

For those unable to make it into a physical store to experience the VR artwork, 15 out of the 20 campaign illustrations also appear in print magazines and newspapers, also scannable via the Gucci app to reveal augmented reality effects on top.

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Editor's pick social media technology

Prada enlists computer-generated influencer to promote Fall 18 show

Lil Miquela for Prada Fall 18
Lil Miquela for Prada Fall 18

Prada has worked with Lil Miquela, a computer-generated virtual influencer, to promote its Fall 2018 collection via animated GIFs on Instagram Stories.

To announce the partnership alongside the label’s Milan Fashion Week runway show, Miquela posted a series of short Instagram videos featuring the GIFs, and invited her followers to head to Stories and play. The call to action read: “Go off!! #pradagifs are live in stories! Start posting and tag me.”

Over on Prada’s account, the CGI avatar gave followers a mini tour of the show space, a new Rem Koolhaas venue, while flying a drone around, which she controlled with her phone.

GIFs ranged from inspiration of Prada’s current collection, as well as nods to more archival pieces such as the SS10 flame shoe and the SS11 banana print.

Lil Miquela for Prada Fall 18
Lil Miquela for Prada Fall 18

Miquela Souza, or Lil Miquela, is a virtual version of a 19-year-old Los Angeles based influencer, who boasts over 600k followers on Instagram, and whose creators remain purposively elusive.

Speaking to the Business of Fashion in February, Miquela explains her success: “Initially, it probably stems from curiosity. I think people stick around because they end up learning more about themselves through the questions they’re asking. I love being able to communicate, learn and talk to everyone from all corners of the world. There is a sense of community to it as well, the people who follow me end up being friends with each other and the communications that it opens up is inspiring.”

Since “launching”, the influencer has been seen wearing the likes of Vetements and Proenza Schouler, while her music track “Not Mine” has been played over 100K times on Spotify.

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Campaigns Editor's pick Retail

Diesel pop-up sells limited edition “fakes” as part of SS18 campaign

Deisel pop up from Diesel
The “Deisel” pop-up from Diesel

Diesel is looking to reinforce its authentic roots with a “fake” pop-up store during New York Fashion Week. As part of its latest campaign celebrating imperfection, the brand opened “Deisel” in NYC’s Chinatown – a neighbourhood known for touting knockoffs – selling seemingly fake goods.

The stunt was eventually revealed on social media, as Diesel shared a video depicting footage of the store. Inside, the pop-up space was set up to look improvised and blend in with its Canal Street neighbors, while shop assistants tried to convince confused passersby that the goods were real.

Once the secret was out, Diesel fans began to form long queues outside the store, trying to get their hands on the limited edition goods, which were also available for purchase in Europe online.

Speaking to reporters, Renzo Rosso, founder of Diesel and president of its parent company OTB Group, said the aim of the campaign is to play on the irony and sense of humor he believes the brand has always relied on, which has been lost over the past few years.

“Diesel is back,” he said. ”Diesel is modern. Diesel is a unique brand. Diesel is still alive with the real irony and with the real DNA that it used to have before.”

Andy Bird, chief creative officer at Diesel’s recently appointed agency Publicis, told Adweek: “I think a brand like Diesel has the balls and the right to talk like this. There aren’t many brands that would take a calculated risk like this, but because they kind of know that they already have the cachet with the past history of advertising, they’ve always been a bit more adventurous and it fits perfectly with their outlook.”

Moving forward, the brand believes social media and campaign stunts are becoming a major focus for engagement. According to Rosso, the next soon-to-be-released stunt will see an individual jump from atop St Marcus tower in Venice, Italy.

In our recent episode of TheCurrent Innovators podcast, Stefano Rosso, Diesel’s CEO of North America, talked in-depth about the brand’s approach to challenging conformity.

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Editor's pick film social media

Diesel hides digital “easter eggs” in latest campaign film

Diesel S/S18 campaign video
Diesel S/S 18 – “Keep the World Flawed”

Diesel’s campaign video for the spring/summer 2018 season, titled Keep the World Flawed, features hidden clues that engage viewers across multiple digital platforms.

Encouraging a life lived in a less than perfectionist manner, the satirical video tells the story of a boy and a girl who met after they both chose to get rid of physical flaws. It was directed by François Rousselet and developed by Publicis Italy.

Throughout the creative work, various digital “easter eggs” can be found hidden. On pausing certain frames, viewers can find web addresses and social media handles, such as @wantedsocks, which leads to an Instagram page selling mismatched Diesel socks, for instance.

Meanwhile, the spot’s fictitious restaurant, called Bluffet, is backed by a real website at Bluffet.com, where in collaboration with Buzzfeed’s Tasty, three video recipes aim to fuel flawed behaviour. The final clue, Layover.it, sends users to a flight engine platform that suggests booking real flights with as many layovers as possible.

The spot, which is accompanied by a print ad photographed by Florence & Nicholas, continues the brand’s “Go with the Flaw” campaign strategy, which aims to celebrate imperfections.

Layover.it
Layover.it

To hear about Diesel’s approach to challenging conformity, listen to The Current Innovators’ podcast episode with Diesel’s CEO of North America, Stefano Rosso.