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Editor's pick technology

Reformation opening tech-enabled store inspired by Silicon Valley

Reformation's tech-enabled San Francisco store
Reformation’s tech-enabled San Francisco store

Reformation is set to open its fifth store, this time in San Francisco, and inspired by brands that call Silicon Valley home, including Apple and Tesla. The result will be a more efficient experience for those who visit, enabled via touchscreen monitors and a smart dressing room setup.

The aim is to get away from the “self-service cafeteria” feel of so many stores, according to founder Yael Aflalo. “Most [stores] are super messy, you can never find your size, you have to wait in line forever, the dressing room lighting is the worst,” she told Fashionista. “I felt like a high-volume, high-end retail experience was basically nonexistent. So we wanted to blend internet and IRL to create a store we’d actually want to go to ourselves — that hopefully solves a lot of these problems.”

She took inspiration from the ease of shopping at Apple, where even on its busiest days, there’s a high level of customer service maintained. She particularly appreciated the fact the products are neatly on display, not cluttering the store, and used that to inform the way she designed her own space, placing her best selling pieces front and centre.

Reformation's tech-enabled San Francisco store
Reformation’s tech-enabled San Francisco store

The touchscreens meanwhile were influenced by Tesla, where there are similarly minimal models on display and instead digital interfaces that showcase the detail of everything you can purchase. “I bought a Tesla in a showroom and it left a profound impression on me,” Aflalo told Fast Company. “Usually buying a car is so difficult and horrible. But buying a Tesla on a flatscreen monitor was so easy that I wondered if I was doing it right: I picked the color I wanted, entered my address, and swiped by credit card, then it was all done. My car showed up a month later.”

Customers to the Reformation store can use the touchscreens to explore looks they like, and then select them to arrive in the dressing room. Much like the Rebecca Minkoff and Ralph Lauren experiences, that connected space allows users to request additional sizes, colours or styles, as well as do things like change the lighting and play your own music.

Aflalo says she’s already planning the next steps, including a system that merges both the online and offline experience in a literal sense – allowing shoppers to purchase an item there and then to have it sent home, or to pre-order at home and have them ready for you to try on when you come in.

The store opens at 914 Valencia Street in San Francisco on February 21.

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business digital snippets e-commerce film mobile social media Startups technology

What you missed: Shopping on Instagram, the mobile web, Silicon Valley’s top retail VC

Shopping Instagram
Shopping is coming to Instagram

The big story on the web this week was of course about shopping coming to Instagram, but backing that idea even further comes the fact mobile browsing overtook desktop for the first time. That’s a huge deal for retailers.

Meanwhile also worth catching up on is an in-depth view on how Nike embraced sustainability, an exploration of what Gen Z and Millennials love and hate about social media, and an update on wearables from the world of Will.i.am. Don’t forget to also sign up for our Snapchat Masterclass taking place on November 22.


TOP STORIES
  • Shopping is coming to Instagram [WWD]
  • Mobile web browsing overtakes desktop for the first time [Guardian]
  • How Forerunner Ventures’ Kirsten Green crashed Silicon Valley’s boys’ club to become retail’s top VC [Forbes]
  • The downward spiral: Why Everlane, Mizzen+Main, and Lululemon don’t discount[LeanLuxe]
  • How mass retailers are traversing ‘big transparency’ [Glossy]

BUSINESS
  • Hermès joins luxury-goods makers reporting Chinese recovery [Bloomberg]
  • Bain: Chinese shoppers’ share of global luxury purchases drops to 30% [Jing Daily]
  • Karlie Kloss and David Lauren talk innovation [BoF]
  • Are the Black Friday sales worth it and are the deals real or a con? [The Telegraph]

SUSTAINABILITY
  • Just fix it: how Nike learned to embrace sustainability [BoF]
  • Kering launches free environmental calculator for fashion designers [Ecouterre]
  • One chart shows how fast fashion is reshaping the global apparel industry [Quartz]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Everlane tests social shopping on Snapchat with Sweet [Glossy]
  • Here’s what Gen Z and Millennials love and hate about Instagram and Snapchat [AdWeek]
  • Facebook’s WhatsApp is testing a feature like Snapchat Stories [Digital Trends]
  • Twitter takes on Facebook as it rolls out customer service chatbots within direct messages [The Drum]
  • YouTube is helping to sell a lot of make-up [Bloomberg]
  • Facebook shares Snapchat attack plan, including a new camera [AdAge]

ADVERTISING
  • Reformation’s founder on its ‘stigma-breaking’ new campaign starring trans model Andreja Pejic [Yahoo]
  • Miss Piggy stars in Kate Spade holiday ad campaign and collection [WWD]
  • Nordstrom gets in festive spirit with customer appreciation campaign [Luxury Daily]
  • H&M replace David Beckham with younger model The Weeknd after five years [International Business Times]
  • Harvey Nichols keeps up irreverent advertising tradition with “Britalia” [The Industry]

RETAIL
  • Simon Malls preps for holiday rush with interactive wayfinding directories [Luxury Daily]
  • John Lewis signs up to click and collect joint venture with Clipper Logistics [Internet Retailing]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Will.i.am moves wearables off the wrist with the help of Kendall Jenner and Apple [NY Times]
  • L’Oréal is using virtual reality to expand the “Matrix Academy” [Fast Company]

START-UPS
  • Introducing Floravere, the first direct-to-consumer, made-to-order wedding dress brand [Fashionista]

UPCOMING EVENTS
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business digital snippets e-commerce film mobile product social media Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: Farfetch photography, questioning Everlane’s transparency, Amazon as the largest apparel seller

Farfetch digital shoot listings fashion retail technology
Farfetch

The Wall Street Journal has a deep-dive story on just what it takes to produce all the imagery for Farfetch’s listed boutiques. Every weekday, it posts an average of more than 1,000 new listings, each with at least five different photographs. Alongside that, perhaps appropriately, comes a new set of stats about Amazon, proving the fact it’s expected to surpass Macy’s to become the biggest apparel seller in the US next year.

Sustainability is also top of mind within the industry of late, with lots of ongoing thoughts around Everlane’s transparency claims and Patagonia’s slow fashion aims. Also worth reading this week are various Snapchat campaigns, not to mention some insights on the pros and cons of retail technology. Don’t forget to also sign up for our Snapchat Masterclass before the early bird rate ends on Oct 31.


TOP STORIES
  • Where luxury fashion is a high-speed, high-volume business – on site with the photography crew at Farfetch [WSJ]
  • Radical transparency: Are H&M and Zara actually more transparent than Everlane? [The Fashion Law]
  • Amazon is expected to surpass Macy’s to become the biggest apparel seller in the US next year [Business Insider]
  • Vine video-sharing app to be shut down by Twitter [The Guardian]
  • Alibaba takes Singles’ Day to global buyers, sellers [China Daily]

BUSINESS
  • Sales surge at Kering’s Gucci, slip at sister brand [Yahoo]
  • American innovation: 5 questions with Shinola CMO Bridget Russo [BrandChannel]
  • How Outdoor Voices founder Tyler Haney plans to grow the brand into the next Nike [Fashionista]
  • In an age of fast fashion, Patagonia is going slow [Yahoo]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Following the screenshots: How Topshop is hacking Snapchat [Digiday]
  • Everlane’s social strategy: drive community engagement, not sales [Glossy]
  • Why Snapchat is winning out over Pinterest for River Island [The Drum]
  • H&M and Kenzo leverage iOS iMessage integration [Glossy]

ADVERTISING
  • REI’s ‘#OptOutside’ returns, and other brands have joined to help make it a new American tradition [Creativity]
  • Target channels Hamilton and The Nutcracker for holiday campaign aimed at Hispanic shoppers [AdWeek]

RETAIL
  • How AI is helping retailers [Venture Beat]
  • When it comes to retail technology, the industry is ‘just getting started’ [NRF]
  • Retail websites pile on the ad tech, but may be repeating publishers’ mistakes [AdAge]
  • Understanding China’s e-commerce and Internet sectors: A guide for global retailers [FBIC]
  • Why Alibaba just staged an 8-hour fashion show [Fortune]

TECHNOLOGY
  • This connected jacket provides VIP access to exclusive NYC experiences, demos future of the Internet of Things [Forbes]
  • The gift and the curse of 3D printing and the legislation we can expect [The Fashion Law]
  • You can now get styled by a fashion-savvy algorithm [Quartz]
  • Google Voice Search comparison-shops on mobile, creating audio ad opportunity [MediaPost]

START-UPS
  • How the Techstars + Target accelerator transformed retail start-up Blueprint Registry [Retail Dive]
  • Is Silicon Valley taking menswear more seriously? [Fast Company]
  • At ThirdLove, just one area of innovation isn’t enough [Medium]

UPCOMING EVENTS
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business data digital snippets e-commerce film mobile technology

What you missed: Luxury on Amazon, understanding data, Nike’s Mark Parker

Luxury is resistant to selling on Amazon
Luxury is resistant to selling on Amazon

The big news this week surrounds the ongoing resistance from luxury to sell on Amazon. Jean-Jacques Guiony, CFO of LVMH, said last week, there is “no way” it would do business with Amazon. “We believe that the existing business of Amazon… doesn’t fit our luxury, full stop, but also doesn’t fit with our brands,” he explained.

Quartz writer Marc Bain has a great overview on this. As he starts his story: “Next year [Amazon is] expected to become the biggest apparel seller in the US, and it boasts an enviable customer base for higher-end brands”. Yet of course, it also presents the problem of being too accessible and not reflective of the high quality customer experience luxury brands are aiming for online – many of them only recently.

Meanwhile, also worth reading this week is a piece on Nike’s Mark Parker and his view on imagination, innovation and art, another on how tech hubs are helping luxury brands return to their roots, and one on the way in which artificial intelligence is changing retail forever. If that wasn’t enough, be sure to also check out new campaigns from Abercrombie & Fitch through to Patagonia.


TOP STORIES
  • Is it even possible to sell “luxury” on Amazon? [QZ]
  • Fashion marketing is failing to understand data [Glossy]
  • Nike’s Mark Parker on imagination, innovation and art [Another]
  • How Silicon Valley (and other global tech hubs) are helping luxury return to its roots [LeanLuxe]
  • Number of Europeans using mobile payments triples, Visa study finds [Internet Retailing]

BUSINESS
  • How Brexit is set to affect how we shop [Daily Telegraph]
  • How do you sell a $6,000 bag your customer can’t touch? [QZ]
  • In stagnant luxury market, luggage brands roll on [BoF]

ADVERTISING
  • Abercrombie & Fitch tries on a new attitude: friendly [WSJ]
  • New Patagonia short film shows how fair trade shopping is good for business [Co.Create]
  • In REI’s tearjerker, people carry out a fellow hiker’s lifelong dream in tribute to his life [AdWeek]
  • Longchamp takes virtual stroll through Paris to mark boutique renovation [Luxury Daily]
  • Avon calling: #BeautyBoss campaign reboots brand [BrandChannel]

RETAIL
  • How artificial intelligence is changing online retail forever [TechCrunch]
  • Karen Millen launches B2B-only tech concept store [Decoded Fashion]
  • British Telecom launches connected store concept [Decoded Fashion]

TECHNOLOGY
  • We’re getting closer to clothing made entirely by robots [QZ]
  • How mobile is transforming product search — and why voice may be next [Retail Dive]
  • Alibaba’s new payment system lets virtual reality shoppers pay by nodding [Reuters]
  • VR is where my fashion dreams can become reality [The Verge]
  • Silkworms spin super-silk after eating carbon nanotubes and graphene [Scientific American]
  • Elle’s augmented reality experiment: fad or future of media? [WWD]

UPCOMING EVENTS
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Nike on 3D printing, HM x Balmain’s selfies, Diesel advertises on Tinder

Here’s a round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

nike

  • Nike’s COO thinks we could soon 3D print Nike sneakers at home [Quartz]
  • H&M x Balmain:  wants to see your selfies [Vogue]
  • Tinder ads tease Diesel fashion models as possible ‘matches’ [Mashable]
  • Louis Vuitton’s spring 2016 show dives into Oculus Rift and virtual gaming [Fashionista]
  • Most fashion houses are baffled by social media. Here’s why old-school Chanel does it best [Washington Post]
  • London-based online fashion startup, Lyst, abandoned a $25 million business — and became huge anyway [Business Insider]
  • Diane von Furstenberg is tapping into millennial tastes to secure her brand’s legacy [AdWeek]
  • Why Burberry’s Snapchat Testino campaign is the best piece of marketing in 2015 [Marketing Magazine]
  • Sears shows how it uses data to build relationships [MediaPost]
  • Can Everlane really become the next J.Crew? [Racked]
  • WME-IMG debuts all-fashion network for Apple TV [BoF]
  • How Diesel talks to its mobile customers through 400 programmatic ads [Digiday]
  • Target’s Kristi Argyilan on what ‘in-house programmatic’ really means [AdAge]
  • China’s Alibaba readies for Singles Day online shopping festival on 11/11/15 [BrandChannel]
  • How Flipkart hopes to shut out rivals by going app-only in India [Tech in Asia]
  • Facebook to test ‘shopping’ section [WWD]
  • ‘In China you have to use it’: How WeChat is powering a mobile commerce boom [Digiday]
  • Why is Silicon Valley pouring millions of dollars into old clothes? [Bloomberg]
  • How (and why) ‘Who What Wear’ bet on commerce [Digiday]
  • The rise of drones [Not Just a Label]
  • A retail geek’s take on modern high-street shopping [The Future of Commerce]
  • What role do fashion runways play in the internet age? [The Globe and Mail]
  • We have not yet reached peak wearable [Re/code]
  • Say it with an emoji: 10 text-free phrases to describe spring 2016 [Vogue]
  • Can content really drive commerce? [Forrester]
Categories
data digital snippets e-commerce social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Apple and Hermès, A/W 15 Rebecca Minkoff in virtual reality, all things tech this #NYFW

Here’s a round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

applewatchhermes

  • Apple plus Hermès: smart watch dream team or weird mash-up? (as pictured) [NY Times]
  • Apple watch and Hermès: a match made for China [JingDaily]
  • You can now watch the A/W 15 Rebecca Minkoff show via a virtual reality headset [Racked]
  • 10 techy things to look out for this New York Fashion Week [Forbes Life]
  • Farfetch creates an independent business to power brands’ e-commerce sites [Fashionista]
  • Apple executive Ian Rogers is heading to LVMH [WSJ]
  • How Chanel trounces other industry brands on YouTube [Digiday]
  • Brace yourselves, Nike self-lacing shoes might arrive in October [PSFK]
  • Ted Baker on why its Instagram success is down to organic reach not its ad formats [The Drum]
  • How discount retailer Primark has evaded e-commerce [Digiday]
  • Uber to unveil big e-commerce delivery program with retailers this autumn [Re/code]
  • Should fashion companies let social media influence what’s hot and what’s not? [Independent]
  • Periscope is set to make fashion weeks more candid than ever this season [Forbes]
  • Inside fashion’s Instagram wars [BoF]
  • How machine vision is about to change the fashion world [MIT Technology Review]
  • Could 3D body scanning mean never entering another dressing room again? [Quartz]
  • Obama administration to open wearable tech R&D center in Silicon Valley [Fast Company]
  • This is the ‘world’s first’ contactless winter jacket [Wired]
  • Why fashionable millennials are flocking to online brands for wardrobe basics [AdWeek]
  • Thread.com unites fashion and tech for $8m investment [TechCityNews]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce film mobile social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Richemont invites LVMH as e-commerce partner, Google and Levi’s on Project Jacquard, JLab’s final 21 start-ups

A particularly oversized round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

Project-Jacquard

  • Richemont invites LVMH to join site to compete with Amazon [BoF]
  • Google is partnering with Levi’s for its Project Jacquard smart fabric (as pictured) [TNW]
  • The 21 tech start-ups getting John Lewis excited in 2015 [The Drum]
  • Marc Jacobs gets Periscope, follows in footsteps of fashion brands Burberry, DKNY & Rebecca Minkoff [WGSN.com/blogs]
  • Macy’s embraces a ‘digical’ world [AdAge]
  • Why Nordstrom is the Amazon of department stores [Fortune]
  • How an Instagram “like” from artist Alice Lancaster unspired Calvin Klein 2016 resort collection [Vogue]
  • Forever 21 drives sales through consumer-generated outfit gallery [Mobile Commerce Daily]
  • Why adidas created content that no one will ever see [Marketing Magazine]
  • Candie’s focuses campaign on Instagram [Media Post]
  • Wayfair gains three times more revenue from YouTube’s shoppable ads [AdAge]
  • MikMak is the smartphone-based reinvention of the infomercial [TechCrunch]
  • Hey retailers, Pinterest just got a whole lot more shoppable – ‘buy it’ button unveiled [AdWeek]
  • Instagram is introducing new shoppable ads [Yahoo! Style]
  • Buy buy buy: Why all of your favorite social networks want you to shop now [Mashable]
  • From startups to mass retailers, it’s a tough time for fashion [Fashionista]
  • Retailers have mishandled mobile payments for years. It’s time to surrender to tech [Quartz]
  • Can Silicon Valley fix women’s fashion? [Buzzfeed]
  • Fashion films: what works and what doesn’t [Fashionista]
  • At Silicon Valley’s very first fashion week, flying pants seem totally normal [The Verge]
  • Coming soon to your smart watch: ads targeting captive eyeballs [Bloomberg]
  • Bolt Threads raises $32 million to make gene-engineered fabric grown in fermentation vats [Forbes]
  • Why we still don’t have cheap, customisable 3D-printed shoes for all [Fast.Co Design]
  • How bloggers make money on Instagram [Harper’s Bazaar]
  • The Kendall Jenner effect: how social media is changing modelling [MTV]
Categories
digital snippets film mobile social media technology Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Chanel, Hugo Boss, Warby Parker, My Flash Trash, CES

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Gamines and a godson star in Karl Lagerfeld’s new Chanel film [Telegraph Fashion]
  • Hugo Boss bolsters runway live-streaming via mobile, Spotify [Luxury Daily]
  • Warby Parker’s latest annual-report infographic is a sight for sore eyes [AdWeek]
  • 12 fashion forward tech accessories from CES [Mashable]
  • What can we learn from the top five retail brands on Twitter? [Econsultancy]
  • Hearst to host technology event during NYFW [WWD]

And as bonus, here’s an incredible deck on social, digital and mobile stats from China. It’s bulky, but well worth the read: [We Are Social]

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Uncategorized

Some thoughts on Web 3.0

I recently attended the IAB’s Annual Leadership Meeting in La Quinta, California, where the key focus of conversation was on the increasingly personal web – also referred to as “Web 3.0” or “Ecosystem 3.0”.

It’s a controversial subject given the privacy concerns that come attached, but the industry is trying to convert such connotations of data to reflect instead feelings of opportunity and ultimately value for both the consumer and the brand involved.

Here are some choice thoughts from the event:

  • Web 3.0 is being facilitated by consumers becoming increasingly used to sharing their information, according to Doc Searls, senior editor of Linux Journal, a fellow with the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, and co-author of The Cluetrain Manifesto.
  • Handling privacy worries comes down to showing consumers they can be in charge of their own data, he said, introducing his theory of vendor relationship management (VRM).
  • It’s about consumers getting to a point where they’re more willing to enter into something because they know and understand what’s happening to their data when they do.
  • Omar Tawakol, CEO of online data exchange company Bluekai said we need to simplify things so people can visually understand what happens to their data.
  • According to Rik van der Kooi, corporate vice president of Microsoft’s Advertiser and Publisher Solutions (APS) group, it should no longer be about people versus data, but instead people and their data. “If we continue to see data as privacy rather than property, we will continue to postpone the opportunity that presents itself here,” he explained.
  • Tawakol said transparency is what will facilitate a move away from the conversation of privacy as one of fear, towards the notion of sharing as beneficial to the user. It’s in having a complete picture of consumers that we will be able to achieve more trust and stronger bonds, resulting in better value for everyone involved, he said.

It was interesting to also read The  Business of Fashion’s post on Web 3.0 this week.

This next phase of the internet, it says, will create an exciting opportunity for fashion retailers.

“In a world where people constantly share personal information, it’s becoming increasingly possible for retailers to analyse this information to better understand the specific context of the individual — her interests, personal style and other parameters — and deliver content and products that are personalised to her needs and desires. Simply put, “Web 3.0” will enable personalised experiences built on the data created by Web 2.0.”

An interview with Silicon Valley strategy consultant, author and entrepreneur Sramana Mitra follows. In it, she says the fashion industry could become more financially successful by utilising personal data: analysing it and designing and merchandising accordingly.

Read the rest, here: The Long View | Sramana Mitra on Web 3.0 and the Science of Personalised Shopping