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mobile social media technology

Henry Holland’s LCM show instantly shoppable thanks to augmented reality app

House of Holland's augmented reality shopping app in action
House of Holland’s augmented reality shopping app in action

The shoppable runway took on new meaning at House of Holland’s London Collections Men presentation this weekend past, with garments available for purchase straight off the back of models thanks to augmented reality.

The initiative was the result of a partnership between Visa Europe Collab and visual discovery and augmented reality app, Blippar.

Users (in this case Radio One DJ Nick Grimshaw and model Rafferty Law) were able to hold their smartphone in front of the desired garment and tap the screen to activate AR technology that would pull up imagery and information about it. They were then able to instantly check out using a pre-registered and prepaid debit or credit card.

“Being able to scan garments through Blippar and purchase them pretty much off [the model’s] back is an amazing technological development and one I have dreamt of as a consumer and a fashion business owner,” said House of Holland founder, Henry Holland.

Visa Europe Collab co-founder Hendrik Kleinsmiede, commented: “Augmented reality has the potential to be transformative for the retail industry. Imagine a future where you can point your phone at a friend’s new outfit with their permission, only for the app to recognise and source that outfit in your size, and give you the option of having it sent straight to your home.”

Indeed, that idea of being able to capture anyone’s outfit and pull up information about where it’s from has long been an appealing one to shoppers. This aims to take that one step closer to reality (albeit a simpler version by being preloaded with truly accurate data thanks to the fact it’s focused on one brand’s products).

The launch at this point is just a proof-of-concept one – meaning it only existed for the moment of the LC:M show – but the aim is to make the technology available to other retailers on a wider scale later this year. Kleinsmiede added that he hopes this virtual shift in traditional shopping behaviour is something we’ll see on the high street very soon.

This was the second time Henry Holland and Visa Europe have worked together. The two collaborated on a wearable technology project in September 2015 that saw items purchased from the brand’s womenswear show during London Fashion Week using a payment ring.

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digital snippets technology

Digital snippets: all the wearable tech news from #CES

under-armour-hb-2

Trawling the halls of the Las Vegas Convention Center during CES is the equivalent of perusing 38 football fields of shoulder-to-shoulder booths featuring endless displays of new technology.

The great news about the internet: you don’t have to actually do that hard work yourself. So here’s a round-up of all the fashion-related and wearable technology news that came out of the week, as written by other people all over the web (I too gave it a miss this year!)…

  • How Under Armour plans to turn your clothes into gadgets [Wired]
  • Under Armour’s Gemini 2 sneakers are fitness trackers for your feet (as pictured) [Mashable]
  • Misfit’s wearables hide their tech behind cool minimalism [Wired]
  • Fitbit Blaze launches as $200 Apple Watch competitor [TechRepublic]
  • Samsung unveils ‘Smart Suit’ as part of family of wearables [Mashable]
  • Samsung made a smart belt that doesn’t suck [The Verge]
  • Fossil to roll out 100 wearables [WWD]
  • OMbra biometric smart sports bra woos women [BrandChannel]
  • L’Oréal patch measures UV exposure [TrendWalk]
  • Fashion icon Iris Apfel debuts luxury smart bracelets that track health [MedicalDaily]
  • Mira’s new smart jewellery combines tech and high fashion [DigitalTrends]
  • Futuristic sneakers tighten automatically, warm your feet and are controlled by an app [MailOnline]
  • Casio maps out smartwatch territory in cyclists and hikers [FT]
  • SCOTTeVEST’s new jacket lets users cleverly store a laptop inside their clothing [iDigitalTimes]
  • Clothes at the CES fashion show actually looked pretty normal [CNET]
  • A look at some of the wackiest wearables on show [Wareable]

Image via Mashable

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Blocks business Comment e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Digital has irrevocably transformed fashion weeks, is it finally time to change the model?

givenchy_ss16

Over the past few weeks and months, fashion brands Matthew Williamson, Hunter, Rebecca Minkoff and Thakoon (to name a few) have made strategic decisions that will not only redefine their business models, but impact the fashion industry as a whole.

Each of them has opted to either withdraw from participating in fashion week, or make their fashion week endeavour a more consumer-facing experience.

At the heart of such plans lies the challenge that social media has presented. As Linda Fargo, senior vice president of fashion and store presentation director at Bergdorf Goodman, told WWD: “We give [the customer] shearling coats in June when she’s just starting to think about shorts. We spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to create excitement and buzz for beautiful products and brand image with runway shows, allowing fast retail to copy it within weeks, while it takes us five months to get deliveries to her. By then, she’s tired of it because it’s been seen in too many posts and images. If you described the fashion cycle from a marketing, seasonality, desire/fulfillment perspective to anyone with any common sense, they would look at you like you were crazy.”

Needless to say, the industry is slowly but surely feeling the need to do something about it. Read the full in-depth story via Forbes, where experts weigh in on whether shifting to a direct-to-consumer model is something that makes sense across the board, or a fit for more contemporary, commercial brands compared to their heritage, Paris-based counterparts. One thing’s for sure, it’s a debate that will take some time to resolve.

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social media

Infographic: This year’s $2m Victoria’s Secret Fantasy Bra reimagined in champagne, selfies and boob jobs

lily_VS_fantasybra

Victoria’s Secret Angel Lily Aldridge will wear this year’s Fantasy Bra at the brand’s annual fashion show tonight in New York. Worth $2 million, the piece includes 6,500 precious gems ranging from yellow sapphires to pink quartz and topaz, all set in 18-karat gold, alongside 375 carats of diamonds.

Called the “Fireworks Fantasy Bra”, it was designed by Geneva-based jeweler Mouawad, and took a reported 685 hours to make.

It will be shown this evening at Victoria’s Secret 20th anniversary show, alongside other models including Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid, as well as music from Selena Gomez, Ellie Goulding and The Weeknd.

The best thing we’ve spotted about it so far however? The infographic below from fashion site Stylight listing 20 alternative luxe and fun things you could buy for the price of the diamond-encrusted bra. Anyone up for 432,000 selfie sticks? Or how about eight return private jets from London to New York? Plus a serious amount of champagne for the ride – 13,100 bottles of Dom Perignon is the equivalent of filling 191 Olympic sized swimming pools. Or if you replace the Fantasy Bra with 26,000 regular Victoria’s Secret lingerie sets, that’s a new set everyday for 71 years.

Victoria-Secret-Fantasy-Bra-Infographic-Stylight-small2

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Blocks Comment film social media

Live streaming fashion week – a classic case of quality over quantity

J. JS Lee spring/summer 2015

Last September I wrote a piece for Mashable about the role of live streaming during fashion week today – the engagement it does and doesn’t afford, and ultimately whether the cost involved is worth it for designers.

There were varying viewpoints. Live viewership isn’t especially high, but numerous brands suggested reaching the ‘super fan’ makes it worthwhile. Furthermore, understanding the ROI is a bit of a grey area anyway – many designers record videos of their shows regardless of whether they’re streaming it, so the greater part of the financial investment live streaming requires is already there. Likewise, many have that cost soaked up as part of their show package at say the Lincoln Center with IMG in New York or Somerset House with the BFC in London.

Regardless of that fact, live streams have become so prevalent, they’re also somewhat mundane. Overall there was also a consensus therefore that a point of difference and a specific content strategy beyond just the 10-minutes or so of the show, would help too.

In New York this season, however, quite a few of the big shows, including DKNY and Diane von Furstenberg, who have live streamed for a good number of seasons in the past, opted not to. Similarly, Made Fashion Week didn’t include live streaming as standard with any of its shows from Milk Studios either.

There was quite a response on Twitter; fans complaining about the fact they weren’t getting to see their favourite shows, using choice words like ‘disappointed’ and ‘annoyed’.

The numbers may not be enormous, but seemingly the engagement of those fans that do tune in has the potential to make it worthwhile. The idea of that super fan again, is loud and it’s strong. Even if they’re not yet customers, at the very least they aspire to be.

Which is why it should be credited that the British Fashion Council is fully backing live streaming for its designers this season, with a record 90% of the schedule set to be available to watch online. Even Tom Ford is – for the first time ever – set to live stream on Monday, September 15, which is a significant shift in strategy comparative to his first show for spring/summer 2011 when he only invited one photographer (his own), turned away all the bloggers, and set a strict embargo on information about the collection so as to relate it more closely to the date the garments hit store.

The British Fashion Council estimates the LFW live streams are watched from 190 countries worldwide. Click here for the full schedule: www.londonfashionweek.co.uk/schedule

Pic: J. JS Lee spring/summer 2015

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data digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media

Digital snippets: adidas, Louis Vuitton, Neiman Marcus, Bitcoin, American Apparel

Here’s a highlight of the best stories in the fashion and tech space over the past couple of weeks…

adidas_Stan_Smith_Popup

  • adidas launches Stan Smith pop-up store, includes 3D-printing station (as pictured) [Dexigner]
  • Louis Vuitton debuts spring campaign on Instagram [Refinery29]
  • Neiman Marcus CEO apologises for data breach, offers free credit monitoring [The Verge]
  • Overstock CEO: Why we’re accepting Bitcoins [CNBC]
  • Five reasons why American Apparel is bullish on Twitter [AdWeek]
  • Aerie’s unretouched ads ‘challenge supermodel standards’ for young women [Huffington Post]
  • Warby Parker launches interactive 2013 annual report [Laughing Squid]
  • Wet Seal hires 16-year-old to build its following on Snapchat [AdAge]
  • François-Henri Pinault puts his money where his mobile is via Square, hints at future for luxury world buying into tech [FT Material World]
  • Show business: are fashion shows still relevant? [BoF]
  • Beacons: what they are, how they work, and why Apple’s iBeacon technology is ahead of the pack [Business Insider]
  • Personalisation is key for beauty omnichannel strategy: L’Oréal Luxe exec [Luxury Daily]
  • Try on virtual make-up and pay with your hand with retail tech at CES 2014 [BrandChannel]
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Uncategorized

DSquared2 wins with turnaround of #TikiGirl show video

 

I recently wrote a piece for Mashable about the value that exists for brands in live-streaming their fashion week shows.

One of the key learnings was that the content surrounding such an initiative needs to be given just as much attention as the collection it is showcasing. Said Dan Clifford, a former VP of marketing at Victoria’s Secret. “We need to be as careful with the content as we are with the product. That’s what reaching the individual that doesn’t have the luxury of being there is about,” he said. “Too many brands isolate the runway as a moment in time and don’t consider the pre and post opportunities that they could be harnessing and leveraging across the whole season.”

It’s for that reason I wanted to highlight the video DSquared2 released less than 24-hours after its runway show in Milan this week. Rather than just your typical 10-minute look at a catwalk show, it opens with two-minutes of content dedicated to setting up its 1950s #TikiGirl theme. Models dance for the camera shaking maracas, quick peeks are provided backstage as well as close-ups on the collection and its accessories, and a killer soundtrack plays over the top. Even designers Dean and Dan Caten both feature before the show itself begins.

Check it out above.

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digital snippets e-commerce film mobile Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Louis Vuitton, Target, John Lewis, M&S, Chinese shoppers

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Louis Vuitton releases Retracing the Trunk video (as above) [Dazed Digital]
  • Target hosts interactive runway show powered by Twitter [BrandChannel]
  • Q&A: John Lewis on the ingredients of a successful multichannel retail strategy [Econsultancy]
  • Rosie Huntington-Whiteley’s M&S lingerie advert complaints dismissed [Vogue.co.uk]
  • Chinese shoppers have gone mobile. So should brands [JingDaily]
  • Fashion 2.0: Online vintage heats up [BoF]
  • 50 must-have fashion apps to download now [StyleCaster]
  • The most influential personal style bloggers right now [Fashionista]
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social media technology Uncategorized

Topman live-stream to offer fans 360° augmented experience

Topman Design spring/summer 2013

Topman is set to launch an interactive 360° live-stream experience for its London Collections: Men autumn/winter 2012/13 show on January 7.

The UK menswear brand will enable fans to scroll left or right, up and down to view the catwalk from any angle in a bid to make it feel ever more like they’re actually present. They can also interact with select industry insiders and celebrities in the front row, whose tweets will appear above their real location in an augmented addition to the live-stream.

As with the company’s Topshop Unique show in September, fans will also be able to “shoot the show” to instantly share images with their friends across social channels. The hashtag being pushed is #Topman360.

“Having streamed the Topman Design show for several seasons now and commenting separately via our social channels we really wanted to try and achieve a multi-faceted live stream experience which amalgamated all in one and make the experience as personal and unique for each viewer,” said Jason Griffiths, marketing director at Topman.

The initiative launches with a Facebook App from today that invites consumers to win a pair of front row tickets to the show as well as other prizes. It will also showcase the live-stream on January 7 alongside Topman.com and the brand’s digital magazine, Topman Generation.

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e-commerce Uncategorized

Topshop show generates over 200m exposures

The Topshop Unique show held during London Fashion Week yesterday promised to offer consumers a social, customisable and shoppable experience through its live-stream on Topshop.com.

The result? A reported 2m people tuning in from over 100 countries across multiple platforms and devices.

Here’s a summary of some of the rest of the facts and stats from the event:

  • A total of 200m people were said to be exposed to images and content from the show, in the main because of its “shoot the Show” tie-up with Facebook, which allowed consumers to share images straight from their video stream
  • #TOPSHOP and #UNIQUE both trended globally on Twitter thanks to live-streaming through the platform for the first ever time, and a “tweet-off” invented by Topshop asking for followers to send in 140-character reviews
  • Topshop also partnered with Elle magazine for a Tweetwalk that saw images shared live from backstage over Twitter on both accounts moments before they hit the runway
  • The result saw Topshop.com clicked on by over 120 countries
  • More traffic was generated to the site from the USA on one day than in its entire history. This was highlighted as particularly exciting in a week were the brand has opened 15 new stores in the country through a partnership with department store Nordstorm
  • The “Customise the Catwalk” shoppable element of the initiative resulted in pieces selling out from the new collection within an hour
  • Make-up products were also purchased during every minute of the show