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Editor's pick mobile social media

Bloomingdale’s goes all out interactive with 2014 holiday windows

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US department store Bloomingdale’s has introduced a series of interactive windows tied to the theme of bows as part of its 2014 holiday campaign.

Gaming is the focus with passersby encouraged to connect to Bloomingdalesholiday.com via their mobile phones to participate in the action.

From there they can get involved in three different games directly in the windows. “Ready Set Bow,” reads the intro before offering up Memo-a-Bow, a card turning memory game; Whack-a-Bow, like a kind of Space Invaders; and Peek-a-Bow, where users have to keep their eye on the bow under the boxes as they move. Each can be played alone or with up to four players.

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Photograph-a-bow is then the name for an experience powered by FaceCake that allows users to take a #selfie on an interactive touch screen to share with their social following. The resulting shots can be accessed via a Facebook app, where you can see and Adore-a-Bow the Incred-i-Bow attempts of others (seriously this one is never ending).

Shoppers are also encouraged to share their special holiday messages and ‘Put a Bow on It’ using the hashtag #bloomiesgreetings via Twitter – each tweet then appears across the New York skyline in yet another window.

Last but not least is Charit-a-Bow, a window featuring a giant teddy bear made by Gund covered in hundreds of gold bows and holding a screen that encourages viewers to donate to the Child Mind Institute.

Retail innovation firm The Science Project, which was responsible for the Saks Fifth Avenue Yeti window project last year, was behind the initiative.

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Pics via WGSN.com

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Comment Editor's pick social media

Abercrombie’s ‘Let’s Get Social’ – a classic example of an in-store sharing #fail

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Let’s talk about photos in stores.

This past weekend, millions of shoppers (albeit fewer than in 2013) descended on their favourite shops to pick up deals tied to Black Friday. Retailers accordingly ran varied promotions, offers and campaigns in a bid to drive that traffic their way – both in store and of course equally online.

Needless to say for many of them, a drive for social sharing anchored the initiatives. If you can get your goods shared / advocated for over Instagram, Facebook and Twitter tied to timed discounts particularly, that’s deemed a pretty hefty incentive for more people to shop.

This of course goes without saying for the seasoned social media staffer…

So how’s this for a confusing in-store strategy to accompany such a move then: Abercrombie & Fitch is running a campaign for the season with the tagline “Post it. Tag it. Like it.” appearing in its store windows. A no brainer for its digitally-savvy target consumer of course – Snapchat ahoy! Online, it’s kidswear line is also promoting the idea of sharing across the usual platforms. “Let’s Get Social,” reads its website header, as pictured above.

A colleague of mine, while researching Thanksgiving weekend retail experiences, did of course opt to shoot some of said imagery in-store. She hit up the brand’s Glendale Galleria location on Saturday at noon, height of the holiday shopping weekend therefore, but was very swiftly asked to put her phone away.

Ok so fair enough, she was shooting the messaging; perhaps there’s still an argument to be had around copyright protection etc etc etc for retailers (though I actually want to argue this pretty heavily these days too given the image-driven world in which we now live), and the associates spotted her for looking more professional than social media-y.

What’s more mind-blowing though is the 13-year-old girls in the store at the same time who were asked to stop taking photos of themselves (#selfies!) when trying on a couple of hats.

The hipster sales guy, as my colleague so eloquently put it, walked over immediately and asked them to stop. He also told others of a similar age no photos at all were allowed to be taken in-store.

I witnessed the same only a couple of months ago in Gap. This time it was a guy in his 30s who was asked to stop. Admittedly he didn’t perhaps look like the type that was about to share his finds on social media, but rather ask his girlfriend’s opinion on whether or not to buy (“Darling, can I #dressnormal?). He certainly wasn’t about to take the shot of the blue jumper he was holding and frogmarch it straight to a factory in China for replication though I assure you.

I suspect in both instances this is a classic case of corporate strategy not reaching sales floor level. Understandably many tech-related things, especially for retailers with so many doors, get lost somewhere down the line. But this isn’t a matter of something substantially confusing or complex – a mere conversation with each manager should suffice.

At the end of the day, how do you expect to have a successful social media campaign and NOT allow social media in the one place you can truly call your own? Abercrombie team – suggest you call Glendale, stat.

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Editor's pick social media

Selfridges hosts Jean Paul Gaultier ‘selfie station’

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A NASA control desk was the inspiration behind a new Jean Paul Gaultier installation currently in place at Selfridges in London.

Created by British set designer Gary Card, the space station setup features multiple screens above various sets of keyboards, showing Gaultier’s autumn/winter 2014/15 collection alongside a series of cosmic images.

Referred to as a ‘digital experience’, it provides shoppers with the opportunity to become a part of it by sitting on a moon buggy that projects images of themselves onto the screens too. From there they can have their ‘selfie’ pictures taken and then share via social media.

Hosted in the Designer Galleries on the second floor, it is part of Selfridges’ autumn/winter 2014/15 campaign called The Masters. This celebration of 12 of the most accomplished names in fashion, also sees the likes of Oscar de la Renta, Dries Van Noten and Yohji Yamamoto featured in the department store’s windows, and a number of exclusive items and capsule collections on sale.

There is also a film created by SHOWstudio comprised of 12 short vignettes dedicated to each designer. It was created in partnership with SHOWstudio and Marie Schuller. Check it out below as well as a series of original images shot in the store.

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Comment Editor's pick social media

Brands be warned: #selfie fatigue

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Did you know, there were already 884 brands running #selfie competitions on Twitter by October 2013 (the year of the selfie), according to social media benchmarking company, Unmetric. Safe to say, that number has only risen since, as everyone from French Connection to Calvin Klein, not to mention Marc Jacobs and DKNY (and that’s in the fashion industry alone) have likewise jumped on the bandwagon.

In theory it’s a quick win: stick a contest up on social that taps into this hashtag phenomenon, sit back and wait to see your consumer engagement sky rocket.

Or so you hope.

In practice, if everyone else is calling for that content too, it doesn’t take long before standing out from the noise is as hard as it’s ever been. Selfie fatigue, or indeed hashtag fatigue is undoubtedly on its way (as so eloquently demonstrated by the lovely Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake). To really find success in this space, what that means is brands need to dedicate as much of a focus to creativity as they would with any other marketing activity.

Enter Yourselfieideaisnotoriginal.tumblr.com, a brilliantly-captioned warning to all on the pits of branded selfie contests. A couple of favourites selected below. Enjoy…

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digital snippets e-commerce social media Startups

Digital snippets: Burberry, Calvin Klein, Moschino, Saks, M&S, Primark

A round-up of all the latest stories surrounding fashion and tech…

 

  • Burberry reveals ‘digital innovation’ partnership with WeChat to strengthen social presence in China [The Drum]
  • Calvin Klein asks fans to snap selfies in their skivvies for #MyCalvins campaign [BrandChannel]
  • Fast-fashion: Moschino offers fans the ability to shop its McDonald’s-themed show live [Dazed Digital]
  • Saks recreates in-store beauty tutorials with six-second videos on Vine [LuxuryDaily]
  • Marks & Spencer launches new website to replace Amazon platform, after three years in the making [The Telegraph]
  • How Primark achieved 1.7m Facebook Likes in just six months [Econsultancy]
  • Former GQ editor Lauren Bans comes out as @CondeElevator Tweeter [Fashionista]
  • New privacy website lets you opt out of tracking in retail stores [AdAge]
  • Ebay buys virtual fitting room start-up PhiSix Fashion Labs [PC Mag]
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social media

Twitter Mirror arrives at fashion week with Matthew Williamson

twittermirrorMatthew Williamson is introducing the Twitter Mirror backstage at its London Fashion Week show this season.

Already becoming a regular feature of events such as The Grammys, The Oscars and even NBA games, this is a tablet usually positioned off-stage that enables celebs to snap selfies and autopost them to the event in question’s Twitter feed.

This will be the first time it is used at a fashion week. Williamson will have it set up for models to interact with in the build up to Sunday’s show. Each shot will be placed in a bespoke frame by the designer that reflects the new autumn/winter 2014/15 collection and its inspiration.

According to the brand’s head of digital, Rosanna Falconer, the aim was to give fans of the brand access behind-the-scenes in much more of a natural way than ever before. In previous seasons, Williamson shows have seen Vine used to reveal the details of the collection in real-time. Without intending to be, the best ones have always been when the models wearing the looks have been a little cheeky.

“This time we wanted to strip away the camera and the photographer, so it was just the models left, and see what we ended up with,” said Falconer.

Vine will be used during the show itself, with three posts revealing key pieces in full narrative – from sketch, to beading and final look. The brand will also continue its #ohmw campaign, handing out props branded with the hashtag to encourage attendees to similarly tweet and Instagram photos of themselves.

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social media

Vero Moda supports Movember with moustache selfies campaign in-store

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Vero Moda is pushing a fun hashtag campaign in its stores to help raise awareness for Movember this year.

The Denmark-based label has placed a series of moustaches in all its dressing rooms allowing shoppers to snap ‘selfies’ of themselves and then share the results over Instagram using #veromodamo.

Reads a sign in its windows: “Come into the Vero Moda dressing room and support the men in your life.”

Every photo shared will see €0.10, up to €35,000 donated to the Movember Foundation to help raise awareness of prostate and testicular cancer. The results are also being hosted on mo.veromoda.com.

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digital snippets e-commerce social media

Digital snippets: Michael Kors, Banana Republic, Macy’s, Kate Spade, John Lewis, L’Oréal, Juicy Couture, Sephora

A short break here means there’s a stack of content to catch up on. Below are the top links for stories surrounding fashion and digital during my recent fortnight of travels. Hours of fun…

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  • Michael Kors’ widely hated Instagram ad was actually a massive success; received almost four times as many likes as the average post [Business Insider
  • John Lewis 2013 Christmas ad beats 2012 ad total YouTube views within days of release [The Drum]
  • Banana Republic, CNNMoney and CNBC among top Twitter accounts during TWTR IPO [TechCrunch]
  • Like what you see? Kate Spade video ad designed for instant shopping [Mashable]
  • L’Oréal Paris launches make-up vending machines in NYC subway [Fashionista
  • Juicy Couture to be first brand to advertise using Snapchat Stories [The Drum]
  • At Sephora, mobile-first means ‘connecting’ the customer’s experiences [eMarketer]
  • Neiman Marcus teams up with Shapeways to offer 3D printed holiday capsule collection [PSFK] 
  • Printemps sets e-commerce strategy [WWD
  • Cartier North America CEO stresses importance of carefully curated digital presence [Luxury Daily]
  • How can retailers make it easier to buy jeans online? [Econsultancy]
  • On the same theme: This app can find your true bra size by taking two selfies of your breasts [Business Insider
  • Vanessa Traina launches new curated e-commerce venture The Line [BoF]
  • Fashion bloggers see a missed opportunity to monetise Instagram posts – why aren’t links allowed? [AdWeek