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Editor's pick sustainability

Consumer demand for accountability and sustainability is on the rise, says report

Fashion Revolution
Fashion Revolution

Ahead of Black Friday, arguably the biggest global shopping day each year, Fashion Revolution has launched a report highlighting that European consumers are urging brands and governments to take the lead in the fight for sustainability within the fashion industry.

Consumers want to know more about the social and environmental impacts of their garments when shopping, and it is incumbent on brands and governments to address those issues, the research reveals.

“The pace of change by the fashion industry simply isn’t moving fast enough, and we can see this reflected in consumer attitudes,” said Sarah Ditty, Fashion Revolution’s policy director. “People have an urgent, emotional desire to know more about how their clothes are made, and that they haven’t harmed the environment, the people who made them nor were tested on animals. And they want governments to hold brands and retailers to account to ensure this happens.”

Conducted across the five largest EU markets (UK, Germany, France, Spain and Italy), the findings from the study reveal that under the topic of sustainability, environmental factors such as climate change (85%) and environmental protection (88%) are considered important by the majority of people, followed by social issues such as global poverty (84%) and gender inequality (77%).

Furthermore, 72% of those surveyed said that fashion brands should do more to improve the lives of the women making their clothes – there is a gender split in opinion, however, as 81% of women surveyed think brands should tackle gender inequality, against 72% of male respondents.

Meanwhile the government should be more proactive in not only ensuring practices are established, but developing tools to communicate it back to the population, it finds.

In an era of extreme distrust in institutions, this cry for change is more relevant than ever. The report shows that the majority of people (68%) place responsibility on the government to hold fashion brands accountable for their sustainability methods. 77% think that fashion brands should be required by law to respect the human rights of everybody involved in making their products, while 75% think they should protect the environment at every stage of the supply chain. Additionally, 72% say brands should provide information about the environmental impact of their business.

“We’d like the general public, companies and governments to use our research to help drive change in the fashion industry, to better influence their peers to care more about social and environmental issues in fashion and start asking vital questions about the impacts of our clothing,” added Ditty.

How information is communicated is a vital part of the puzzle in helping consumers match their sustainability goals with actual purchase. An earlier report by Fashion Revolution also highlighted that 80% of consumers think brands should publish which factories were used to manufacture their clothes, or which suppliers they use to source their materials from (77%).

Earlier this week, fashion data platform Lyst unveiled its year in fashion report for 2018, which trackers over 100m searches on its site over the past 12 months to analyze the trends and the buzziest brands. It revealed a 47% increase in shoppers looking for items that have sustainable credentials, using terms like “vegan leather” and “organic cotton”. Veja, a French-Brazilian sneaker brand that uses sustainable that uses sustainable materials, showed a 113% year-on-year uptick on searches, for example.

How are you thinking about sustainability? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Burberry and Farfetch, Natalie Massenet on exiting BFC, Alibaba’s retail strategy

Cara Delevingne in Burberry latest collection
Cara Delevingne in Burberry’s latest collection

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Burberry to expand online reach with Farfetch tie-up [Telegraph]
  • For Natalie Massenet, change brings opportunity [BoF]
  • Alibaba invests another $1.3 billion into its offline retail strategy [TechCrunch]
  • Can Marchesa survive in a post-Weinstein world? [Refinery29]
  • NYFW roundup: #MeToo conversations, immersive runways and supersized robots [TCDaily]
TECHNOLOGY
  • In-depth: H&M puts tech at the heart of action plan to turn the brand around [TCDaily]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • When it comes to millennials’ fashion buys, price and convenience trump sustainability [WWD]
  • If you care about ethical fashion, it’s time to stop sleeping on G-Star Raw [Fashionista]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Selfridges opens in-store boxing gym in “world first” [RetailGazette]
  • WeWork moves into retail with new partnership with J.Crew [Glossy]
  • Mulberry takes over Spencer House for London Fashion Week 2018 [Campaign]
  • Fewer happy returns in retail land as companies tighten generous return policies [Fung Global Retail Tech]
  • Target will roll out same day delivery in Twin Cities next month as it faces off with Amazon [StarTribune]
  • Google wants to change the way we shop online, beginning with beauty brands [Campaign]
MARKETING
  • How Nike’s “Nothing Beats a Londoner” advert taps into real London culture [HypeBeast]
  • PORTER becomes editorial voice across Net-A-Porter as it goes digital with daily updates [TheIndustry]
SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Inside Vans’ social media strategy [Digiday]
  • Pinterest now lets you archive boards, rearrange pins and more [AdWeek]
PRODUCT
  • This blouse comes with free performance coaching sessions [FastCompany]
  • Macy’s is making history with its new hijab-friendly clothing line [Brit+Co]
  • Customization in beauty is on the rise, but its scalability is uncertain [Glossy]
BUSINESS
  • Blockbuster Gucci continues to boost Kering [BoF]
  • Fashion unicorn Farfetch will soon interview bankers for its New York IPO [CNBC]
  • Richemont uncovers counterfeiters abusing customer service line to copy designs [WWD]
  • The future of luxury: 7 trends reshaping the luxury industry [CBInsights]
Categories
business data digital snippets e-commerce Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: retail’s existential reckoning, Echo Dot is the Christmas best seller, bots on the rise

2017 was the year of retail’s existential reckoning
2017 was the year of retail’s existential reckoning

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the final fortnight of 2017.


TOP STORIES
  • 2017 was the year of retail’s existential reckoning [Quartz]
  • The Echo Dot was the best-selling product on all of Amazon this holiday season [TechCrunch]
  • Bots are about to get better at customer support than humans [Wired]
  • The last days of Colette [Garage]

BUSINESS
  • Retailers feel shoppers’ Christmas cheer [WSJ]
  • Jonathan Saunders steps down from DVF role [Guardian]
  • Meet Oscar Olsson, the mind behind H&M’s new brand for millennials [TheCut]
  • Reformation raises $25 million to fuel brick-and-mortar growth [BoF]
  • Clothing companies are trashing unsold merchandise instead of donating it [TheOutline]
  • With Phoebe Philo leaving Céline, what’s next? [BoF]
  • UK cotton back in production in Manchester [BBC]

MARKETING
  • Adidas brings all-star talent and tech to the table [BrandChannel]

E-COMMERCE
  • Prada launches e-commerce platform in China [Reuters]
  • The fake news of e-commerce [Racked]
  • There’s money to be made in returning e-commerce orders [LA Times]
  • What fashion brands can learn from Nike’s first six months as an Amazon partner [Glossy]
  • E-commerce company ThredUP rolls out AI-powered ‘goody boxes’ to rival discount clothing chains [AdWeek]

STORES
  • Walmart is developing a personal-shopper service for rich moms — and a store with no cashiers [Recode]
  • Sephora mastered in-store sales by investing in data and cutting-edge technology [AdWeek]

TECHNOLOGY
  • This is Magic Leap’s mixed reality headset [Engadget]
  • If the bitcoin bubble bursts, this is what will happen next [Wired]
  • Mall of America gets high-tech with chatbot and humanoid robots [Racked]
  • Ikea is stepping into virtual reality by creating a game for new store openings [AdWeek]
  • Beauty tech made major strides in 2017, and it’s only the beginning [Fashionista]

START-UPS
  • Target to buy Shipt for $550 million in challenge to Amazon [Bloomberg]
  • Meet the nanotech scientist who used her mad skills to build a better party clutch [FastCompany]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce product social media technology

What you missed: See-now-buy-now, Nicopanda x Amazon, Kering tops sustainability index

Nicopanda spring 2018 will see one-hour delivery from Amazon
Nicopanda spring 2018 will see one-hour delivery from Amazon

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past week.


TOP STORIES
  • Three seasons in, see-now-buy-now is going nowhere [Glossy]
  • Amazon tests one-hour catwalk-to-doorstep deliveries at Nicopanda show [Reuters]
  • Kering tops the Dow Jones Sustainability Index once more [FashionUnited]
  • British Fashion Council launches climate change initiative with Vivienne Westwood [BoF]

BUSINESS
  • The trouble with Topshop [BoF]
  • Hermès hits record first-half profit [FT]
  • BFC/Vogue Designer Fashion Fund announces JD.com partnership [The Industry]
  • Giorgio Armani on London fashion week: ‘It’s the only true city where you see the creative turmoil’ [The Guardian]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Victoria Beckham takes top spot in digital engagement during NYFW [WWD]
  • How Mario Testino found a new lens through Instagram [Campaign]

MARKETING
  • Mick Rock shoots Rome residents for Gucci campaign [Dazed]
  • Inside Dior’s first micro-influencer campaign [Glossy]
  • Puma signs long-term partnership with Selena Gomez [FashionUnited]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Liu Qiangdong, the ‘Jeff Bezos of China’, on making billions with JD.com [FT]
  • eBay moves into luxury with fashion start-up Spring [Racked]

TECHNOLOGY
  • All the tech plans for Tommy Hilfiger’s LFW show [Forbes]

PRODUCT
  • Stone Island’s thermo-sensitive ice knitwear collection changes colour in cold weather [Design Boom]
  • Nike introduces Flyleather, its latest ‘super material’ [BoF]
  • Nike unveils ‘connected’ jersey for NBA partnership [BoF]

START-UPS
  • Fashion start-up wants customers to be able to customise every item they buy [PSFK]
  • Natalie Massenet joins seed funding for hosiery start-up Heist [BoF]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce product social media Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: Wang’s text-to-buy line, Stitch Fix to IPO, activism from outdoor brands

The Adidas Originals by Alexander Wang line launched via text message
The Adidas Originals by Alexander Wang line launched via text message

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past week.


TOP STORIES
  • The second Adidas Originals by Alexander Wang line launches via text-to-buy event [Racked]
  • Stitch Fix has filed confidentially for an IPO [Recode]
  • A call to activism for outdoor apparel makers [NY Times]
  • How Reebok, Adidas and Y-3 will dress future space explorers [Fast Company]

BUSINESS
  • Jimmy Choo bought by Michael Kors in £896m deal [BBC]
  • MatchesFashion.com could enter stock market [Fashion United]
  • Bangladesh to digitally map all garment factories [JustStyle]
  • Fashion must fight the scourge of dumped clothing clogging landfills [Guardian]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Vogue takes ‘hub and spoke’ approach to Snapchat editions in Europe [Digiday]

MARKETING
  • Why Helmut Lang hired an editor-in-residence in place of a creative director [Glossy]
  • Amazon and Nicopanda launch LFW ‘see now, buy now’ range [Retail Gazette]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • China’s store of the future has no checkout, no cash and no staff [BoF]
  • Saint Laurent to launch online sales in China [WSJ]
  • You will soon be able to search eBay using a photo or social media web link [CNBC]
  • MatchesFashion.com’s Tom Chapman: Amazon’s missing the ‘magic’ of high-end fashion [Glossy]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Walmart is developing a robot that identifies unhappy shoppers [Business Insider]
  • For the first time ever, you can buy your own 3D-printed garment online [Fashionista]
  • MIT’s living jewellery is made up of small robot assistants [TechCrunch]
  • Intel axed its entire smartwatch and fitness-tracker group to focus on augmented reality, sources say [CNBC]

START-UPS
  • John Lewis unveils retail tech start-ups for JLAB 2017 [The Industry]
  • Spider silk start-up spins into retail by buying an apparel company [Fortune]
Categories
e-commerce technology

E-commerce businesses look to the future with increased plans for new technologies – study

69% of European retailers plan to invest in robotics over the next five years
69% of European retailers plan to invest in robotics over the next five years

European retailers are increasingly looking at new technologies including virtual reality and the Internet of Things (IoT) in a bid to increase sales margins and improve customer experience, according to new research from e-commerce consultancy Salmon.

The study finds that 61% of e-commerce directors across wholesale, retail and manufacturing companies are currently investing in IoT enablement, with 35% believing it is the biggest priority as a business. Within those numbers, 69% plan to invest in robotics and 60% in machine learning in the next five years.

The voice interface is also top of mind thanks to the growth of devices like Amazon Echo and Google Home, with 53% of respondents planning to invest by 2022. Similarly, 59% plan to take advantage of virtual or mixed reality.

Patrick Munden, global head of retail at Salmon, said: “E-commerce is undoubtedly one of the most exciting and rapid developing industries, and it’s vital that companies continue to innovate to boost business and consumer demand. Exploring the latest technologies is no longer a nice-to-have but a must-have for any businesses expecting to drive sales and improve their customer experience. This latest research shows that, whilst many perceive technologies such as wearables, mixed/virtual reality and voice interfaces as the preserve of the tech-savvy consumer, wholesale, manufacturing and retailers are now investing heavily in this space.”

In spite of that, the study also shows that figuring out which of the technologies to turn to is a continuing concern for businesses. Over a third (36%) believe they find it difficult to commit to new technologies through fear of investing in the wrong area, and 47% think that they have invested in tech that has been a waste of money in the past.

Coping with more data is also a concern: 92% of organisations agree they need to be able to better analyse consumer data, while 48% believe organising their business to react quickly to change will be a major challenge in the future.

Unsurprisingly, 74% say they plan to switch e-commerce platform in the next 12-18 months, recognising the importance of a system in place that is ready to meet the future needs of the business and its customers.

Categories
business data digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: Amazon’s big data ambitions and on-demand textiles, Facebook’s VR, a sustainability deep dive

Amazon's Echo Look
Amazon’s Echo Look

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past fortnight.


TOP STORIES
  • Amazon’s big data fuelled fashion ambitions [TechCrunch]
  • Amazon wins patent for on-demand textile manufacturing [Retail Dive]
  • Facebook launches VR project Facebook Spaces [The Drum]
  • Tech tackles the fitting room [Racked]

BUSINESS
  • LVMH takes control of Christian Dior in $13 billion deal [BoF]
  • Hermès joins trend of accelerating luxury sales growth [Business Insider]
  • Kit and Ace shutters all stores worldwide, except in native Canada [Retail Dive]
  • Retail workers fight to get a cut in the era of e-commerce [Racked]
  • Debenhams unveils its turnaround strategy [The Industry]

SUSTAINABILITY
  • How to cut carbon emissions as e-commerce soars [Bain & Co]
  • Are fashion’s recycling schemes as effective as they seem? [The Fashion Law]
  • Is deadstock the future of sustainable fashion? [Fashionista]
  • The myth of closed-loop manufacturing [Glossy]
  • How much has actually changed 4 years on from the Rana Plaza collapse? [Refinery29]
  • Why is fashion still sleeping on all-natural dyes? [Fashionista]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • How brands are finally cashing in on social with shoppable Instagram Stories and Snapchat ads [AdWeek]
  • Why does the term ‘influencer’ feel so gross? [Man Repeller]
  • Rue21, mode-ai launch virtual stylist with Facebook Messenger group feature [Retail Dive]

MARKETING
  • The state of data strategy in fashion and retail [Glossy]
  • Do podcasts make you wanna shop? [Racked]
  • John Lewis unveils experiential National Treasures summer campaign [The Industry]
  • Mytheresa.com teams with Miu Miu on capsule, fashion film [WWD]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Macy’s and the survival of retailing [Bloomberg]
  • Why retailers are trying on showrooms [Retail Dive]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Amazon builds team for autonomous vehicle technology [AutoNews]
  • Burt’s Nature showcases the Burt of Burt’s Bees in VR [The Drum]
  • Estée Lauder’s augmented reality efforts focus on Europe [L2]

START-UPS
  • Walmart’s tech incubator hires co-founder of Rent the Runway [Bloomberg]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce Editor's pick mobile social media Startups technology

What you missed: Blockchain in fashion, the dark side of digital luxury, Alibaba on tech’s future

Blockchain fashion
Blockchain in use at Shanghai Fashion Week

The role Blockchain will play in the fashion industry is our top story this week after it was documented from a storytelling and verification perspective at Shanghai Fashion Week by Babyghost and VeChain. The opportunity for the fashion industry at large to look to embrace it for anti-counterfeiting and provenance is brought to mind.

Meanwhile, the ongoing struggle of luxury brands has been strongly documented this past week, from the positive effect Brexit has had on the likes of Burberry to a new report from Bain/Altagamma on what’s ahead. That sits alongside insight from Luca Solca, head of luxury goods at BNP Exane Paribas, on the strategic threats of digital to luxury brands.

Also worth reading this week are predictions for the future of technology from Alibaba’s Jack Ma and an interview with Apple retail chief Angela Ahrendts on turning stores into town squares. Don’t forget to also sign up for our Snapchat Masterclass before the early bird rate ends on Oct 31.


TOP STORIES
  • Blockchain technology hit Shanghai Fashion Week [Bitcoin Magazine]
  • The dark side of digital [BoF]
  • Alibaba’s Jack Ma just predicted the next 30 years of technological change [Fortune]
  • Speed, transparency and efficiency lead Blockchain’s potential for disruption [Stores]

BUSINESS
  • If not for Brexit, Burberry would be in even bigger trouble [Quartz]
  • Luxury isn’t having a very good year [NY Times]
  • 8 experts predict the 2016 holiday shopping season [Retail Dive]
  • Is the new Style.com working? [BoF]
  • MPs unanimously back motion to strip Sir Philip Green of his knighthood [The Industry]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Why chat may be king of the new mobile landscape [Fast Company]
  • Fashion brand All Saints uses Instagram as a sales channel [Digiday]
  • Fendi extends life of Snapchat stories with international album [Luxury Daily]
  • Here’s how brands like Nordstrom are cashing in on Snapchat’s long-awaited API [AdWeek]
  • How Nike is beating brands like Apple and Adidas at Twitter customer care [AdWeek]

RETAIL
  • Apple retail chief Angela Ahrendts on turning stores into town squares [Fortune]
  • Everlane mulling brick and mortar efforts [Retail Dive]

TECHNOLOGY
  • YOOX Net-A-Porter unveils plans for new London technology hub [Vogue]
  • Why ‘Silicon Valley Fashion Week’ is not a joke [WWD]
  • Charlotte Tilbury’s new virtual ‘magic mirror’ serves as active make-up selling tool [Forbes]
  • Shiseido partnered with Microsoft to create a make-up filter for women who telecommute [Quartz]
  • Mirror scans your face and prints the perfect make-up [PSFK]
  • Brands are testing programmatic catalogues [Glossy]

START-UPS
  • Your brilliant Kickstarter idea could be on sale in China before you’ve even finished funding it [Quartz]

UPCOMING EVENTS
Categories
business e-commerce Editor's pick

Digital and discounts ride to rescue of battered luxury sector

luxury digital prada
Prada

Global uncertainty on too many fronts is keeping the luxury market in standby mode at the moment. Even the sector’s big spenders are worrying about terrorism, the oil market, the US presidential election, Brexit, and this currency going up or that one going down.

So it all adds up to a tough time for the sector. Well, ‘tough’ may be putting it too strongly. According to a Bain/Altagamma report, sales are going to hold steady for 2016 at a mere €249bn/$273bn for those luxury goods we can simply walk into stores and buy like bags, boots and $500 jeans.

Add in other luxury goods like art, yachts, private jets, interior designers, cars that do 0-60 in four seconds and restaurants where you have to book six months in advance, and you have a market worth a cool €1trn.

But no growth is no growth, whether you’re a 99p store or LVMH. So, in the face of a stagnating market, what is the luxury world doing?

Bain partner Claudia D’Arpizio said: “Brands are refocusing on the local customer base and working to develop products that are more affordable and more inclusive to meet their needs.”

Now we’ve been here before, of course. Once upon a time luxury brands churned out quite a lot of lower-priced goods that were designed to pull in the less affluent among us, but after the last recession many of the firms involved decided that “wannabe luxury customers” weren’t worth the effort and focused on the truly affluent with ultra luxury products at eye-watering prices.

But it’s not that easy anymore and companies are having to think differently.

“The luxury market has reached a maturation point. Brands can no longer rely on low-hanging fruit. Instead, they really need to implement differentiating strategies to succeed going forward,” said D’Arpizio. “We are already starting to see clear polarisation when it comes to performance with winners and losers emerging across product categories and segments.”

luxury digital gucci
Gucci
THANK GOODNESS FOR DIGITAL

One thing the sector is doing is focusing (finally) on digital. Bain said e-commerce leads among luxury shopping channels as a growth strategy.

The report puts it like this: “Around the world, retail, which continued to gain share as recently as last year, drastically slowed with the first footprints of rationalisation in the market. E-commerce is the leading channel in terms of growth, reaching 7% penetration in 2016, which makes it the third largest luxury ‘market’ globally after the US and Japan and a key driver in luxury’s digital revolution.”

Digital continues to be a democratising force on the global luxury market. Previously high barriers to entry have all but been destroyed, enabling emerging brands to compete directly with more established players.

“Naturally, an influx of new market entrants is concerning to incumbents, who are worried about losing market share,” said Bain’s Federica Levato. “But, we anticipate big opportunities for the brands that are willing to think and act more like their up-and-coming counterparts.”

luxury digital Dolce & Gabbana
Dolce & Gabbana
DISCOUNTING, LUXURY’S SECRET WEAPON?

Discounting is also key, which may be a bit contradictory for a sector that claims to hate markdowns. But when those markdowns are under brands’ control, they don’t seem too unhappy.

Today, discounted luxury goods represent more than 35% of the personal luxury goods market, versus full-price and off-price stores comprise more than 30% of the market. These numbers are expected to increase as consumers continue to push for value for money. Luxury brands that can strategically, rather than tactically, manage the outlet channel while reducing discounts in stores will reap the rewards, Bain said.

Accessorisation and polarisation are also prevailing market trends. Soft accessories and jewellery continue to be consistent outperformers, surpassed only by beauty, despite variable trends from brand to brand.

And what exactly does polarisation mean? The ongoing polarisation trend is the outperformance of the Absolute luxury and Accessible luxury segments. Unlike in previous years, where brand performance was largely even among the major players, the current era more clearly reveals brands with a strong lead and those that are falling behind in these sectors.

And finally, what about the Chinese consumer? Mainland China is increasingly outperforming the market as Chinese consumption at home increases. However, the rise in local spending doesn’t offset decreased purchases among Chinese tourists, especially in Europe.

For the first time in history, Chinese consumers have decreased their contribution to the total luxury market from 31% in 2015 to 30% in 2016. Local factors such as price differentials, lower levels of service, and overall incomparable shopping experiences are driving down volumes and average ticket sales at home compared to Chinese consumers’ purchases overseas.

But over the longer-term, Chinese luxury spending and the country’s contribution to total personal luxury goods consumption are expected to trend upward, due in large part to a growing middle class with more disposable income to spend on luxury purchases.

Looking ahead, D’Arpizio anticipates the personal luxury market will reach €280bn-€285bn by 2020 (compound annual growth rate of 3%-4%, beginning in 2017), but cautions that it won’t be an easy road.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday.

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business digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups technology

What you missed: Google’s fashion week plans, Style.com opens, Tom Ford’s second movie

fashion tommy gigi carnival
Tommy Hilfiger’s carnival plans at New York Fashion Week

A few days before New York Fashion Week begins and needless to say much of the focus is on those plans – from Tommy Hilfiger’s carnival to Misha Nonoo’s Snapchat show, not to mention an update on Google that will see fashion brands curating what their search results look like pertaining to the new season.

Also hitting the headlines over the past week has been everything from M&S cutting head office jobs, Smashbox’s virtual reality campaign and our interview with Westfield’s Lindsey Thomas. Don’t forget to check out our full list of upcoming events at the bottom too…


TOP STORIES
  • This fashion week, Google gets a new look [NY Times]
  • Condé Nast’s Style.com is now open for business [The Industry]
  • Tom Ford makes comeback at Venice festival with his second movie [Reuters]
  • H&M open entries for 2nd annual innovation grant [Fashionista]

BUSINESS
  • Marks & Spencer looks to cut up to 500 jobs at London head office [The Guardian]
  • How online fashion companies use data to enhance sales [Fashion United]
  • The Blonde Salad ups the ante [BoF]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Innovating on Snapchat: Misha Nonoo, Ann Taylor Loft and River Island [F&M]

RETAIL
  • How the founder of Farfetch is politely reinventing the boutique for the digital age [The Telegraph]
  • One year on: How Westfield Bespoke, the retail tech space piloted in San Francisco, is winning [Forbes]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Smashbox goes behind the scenes of a photo shoot in its foray into VR [AdWeek]
  • Here’s how shoppable video will (finally) work [Venture Beat]

START-UPS
  • In-depth with Modern Meadow: the start-up bioengineering leather in a lab [Forbes]

UPCOMING EVENTS