Categories
Editor's pick product technology

Tommy Hilfiger launches smart clothing that rewards users per wear

Tommy Jeans Xplore

Tommy Hilfiger has launched Tommy Jeans Xplore, a line of smart chip-enabled clothing that rewards consumers for each wear. In doing so, it is gamifying an experience for its brand fans and ambassadors with immediate rewards, which include discounts and exclusive experiences.

Items in the collection each have an embedded bluetooth low-energy smart tag provided by Israel-based Awear Solutions, which connects the physical product to a dedicated Tommy Jeans Xplore app. Once activated, the app acts as a direct line of communication to the consumer and based on a points system, allows the user to receive rewards and experiences in real time, based on garment wear.

“We’ve always been at the forefront of digital innovation, using technology to deliver what our customers are looking for – unique experiences and instant gratification,” said designer Tommy Hilfiger to WWD. “Tommy Jeans Xplore is the next evolution of our vision, reaching consumers where they are and inviting them to be a part of the brand experience.”

Rewards include concert tickets through a partnership with Live Nation and exclusive access to the brand and its events, such as visits to the Tommy Archives and invites to its runway shows. Users can also redeem product discounts or convert their earned points into monetary donations to charities.

Tommy Jeans Xplore

The line, which is currently available only in the US, consists of 23 items of clothing across women’s, men’s and unisex designs. This includes hoodies, t-shirts and accessories such as a crossbody bag and a backpack.

Tommy Hilfiger has made strides in establishing itself as an industry innovator investigating how to personalize engagement with its young, digitally-savvy audience across the board. Last year’s launch of a shoppable image recognition app during its LA runway show demonstrated the brand’s commitment to inserting digital moments at every consumer touchpoint.

Engaging with consumers through technology, among other innovations, was the main topic of discussion by Tommy Hilfiger and chief brand officer Avery Baker at this year’s British Fashion Council fashion forum, curated and produced by TheCurrent. Stay tuned for an upcoming TheCurrent Innovators podcast episode with Baker, which will be recorded live in New York City in August.

Tommy Jeans Xplore
Tommy Jeans Xplore
Categories
business data digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media technology

ICYMI: Mary Meeker’s internet trends, Balenciaga’s t-shirt meme, drones at Walmart

Balenciaga - ICYMI mary meeker internet trends meme
Balenciaga

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Mary Meeker’s 2018 internet trends report: All the slides, plus analysis [Recode]
  • Balenciaga heard you like shirts, so they put a shirt on a t-shirt for $1,300 [Mashable]
  • Walmart’s future may include in-store drone assistants and smart shopping carts [CNBC]
  • How Natalie Massenet’s new VC firm sees the future of retail [Pitchbook]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Blockchain can help authenticate ownership of fashion goods [WWD]
  • Blockchain and beauty go together, according to Tev Finger [WWD]
  • AmEx pilots blockchain-based loyalty rewards with Boxed [RetailDive]
  • Google is actually pretty good at identifying what people are wearing [Racked]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • ‘Need it, text it, get it’: How concierge service Jetblack is aiming to beat Amazon Prime [Glossy]
  • How OPI is hacking Amazon and data algorithms to improve its online site [Glossy]
  • Lululemon hits record high on revamped stores [Reuters]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Snapchat launches its first Lens that reacts to sound [Engadget]
  • How Macy’s is using its store employees and stylists as Instagram influencers to drive sales [Glossy]
PRODUCT
  • ALYX’s Matthew M. Williams reveals data-inspired Nike capsule [HypeBeast]
  • Zac Posen’s new Delta uniforms are the ultimate high-performance outfits [FastCompany]
BUSINESS
  • The Gucci-Gap divide: How luxury is winning the race for millennial spend [BoF]
  • J.Crew will relaunch this fall [Racked]
  • The changing face of fashion PR [BoF]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media technology

ICYMI: Starbucks’ blockchain rewards scheme, luxury in the age of digital Darwinism

Starbucks’ Rewards scheme
Starbucks’ Rewards scheme

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Starbucks’ Rewards scheme is part of its much bigger vision for a blockchain-backed digital currency [TheDrum]
  • Luxury in the age of digital Darwinism [McKinsey]
  • Meet fashion’s first computer-generated influencer [BoF]
  • Instagram appeal: How social media is changing product development in beauty [Digiday]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Retail spending on AI to reach $7.3B by 2022 [Retail Dive]
  • MIT scientists created accessories that change color to match your outfit [QZ]
  • The Grammys brought IBM Watson’s artificial intelligence to the red carpet [AdWeek]
  • Walmart’s new robots are loved by staff—and ignored by customers [TechnologyReview]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Bonobos CEO Andy Dunn explains the Walmart acquisition: ‘We have a safe and permanent home’ [Glossy]
  • Personalization is a priority for retailers, but can online vendors deliver? [AdWeek]
  • H&M moves into the off-price marketplace with Afound [FashionUnited]
  • Selfridges launches world’s first in-store boxing gym [FashionNetwork]
  • Mashable and eBay team up for launch of shoppable images pilot [TheDrum]
PRODUCT
  • Adidas Boost: the sneaker technology that changed a company’s fortunes [GQ]
  • GlassesUSA.com to launch 3D printable glasses [FashionUnited]
  • Amazon just patented some creepy “Black Mirror”-esque tracking wristbands [FastCompany]
BUSINESS
  • After 15 years, eBay plans to cut off PayPal as its main payments processor [Recode]
  • Ralph Lauren is discovering how hard it is to fix a brand [Fortune]
  • H&M admits ‘mistakes’ in handling shift to online shopping [FT]
  • JD.com puts France at the heart of its internationalization strategy [FashionNetwork]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce Editor's pick mobile social media technology

Digital snippets: high-skilled immigration, The Outnet’s social study, Kors on customer loyalty

digital snippets michael kors
Michael Kors on Instagram

We’re back with another round-up of everything you might have missed in fashion, digital comms and technology news over the past week. Top of the agenda is a perspective on why high-skilled immigration policy is important for fashion and tech, while there’s also highlights from The Outnet, Michael Kors, Tiffany & Co, Zaraa and moe.

We’re now taking a leaf out of the European guidebook and having a bit of a summer break. Hoping you all get to do the same and we’ll see you soon!


  • Why high-skilled immigration policy is vital for fashion and tech [Medium]

  • The Outnet’s social media study on joy provides key content lessons for brands [Forbes]

  • Michael Kors is turning Instagram into a customer-loyalty vehicle (as pictured) [Glossy]

  • Tiffany & Co releases a Snapchat filter [Allure]

  • Zara pulls products after plagiarism allegations on social media [Retail Dive]

  • Yoox Net-a-Porter boss Federico Marchetti looks to China for sales growth [South China Morning Post]

  • Madewell launches 24 days of denim campaign [WWD]

  • Selfridges launches social shopping app [Mobile Marketing]

  • Nike gives babies a stirring speech on unfairness, ambition and triumph [AdWeek]

  • Primark and Ross thumb their noses at e-commerce, will it work? [Forbes]

  • Combatant Gentlemen is tech first, fashion second [WSJ]

  • Fashion retailer New York & Company plans to lift sales with Shopkick rewards [Geomarketing]

  • Vodafone’s Internet of Things swimsuit detects harmful UV levels [Campaign]

  • Drones: Giant leap forward as UK agrees Amazon tests [Trendwalk]

  • Why retailers still struggle with omnichannel—and how they can conquer the challenge [Retail Dive]

  • Inside Pinterest’s effort to woo fashion brands [Glossy]

  • The internet is so bad, it’s awesome [BoF]

  • The pull of personal stylists in the online-shopping era [The Atlantic]

  • What 3D printing means for fashion [BoF]
Categories
business Comment e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Comment counts: Rewarding engagement over purchases

Brands and retailers need to reward consumers who not only spend the most money, but spend the most time with them, says Bia Bezamat of GDR Creative Intelligence.

Sooruz04_web

Rewarding those who buy the most is easy. Brands and retailers have spent years studying and tailoring purchase and behavioural data to a point of individual personalisation, launching initiatives off the back of such insights like British supermarket Waitrose’s best-in-class rewards scheme that allows customers to pick which items they want to receive discounts on.

But we are now seeing that as these systems refine and mature, brands are starting to look beyond individual sales and develop ways to invest in those customers who make the most effort to connect with them. Realising that consumers buy into the lifestyle of a brand as much as they often do the product (Apple devices spring to mind), this shift can only help in the long run; encouraging invested customers to always go that extra mile to consume the brand.

Ensuring interaction and engagement however, can often be tricky unless there is a clear mutual benefit, from discounts to perks. French skate and extreme sports brand Sooruz is one example of a company that is thinking outside the box in this regard. It has devised a clever permanent way to be a part of their customers’ lives by introducing The List, an app that rewards fans with discounts the more they perform skate tricks.

Skaters can attach their phones to the bottom of their boards using a free Sooruz-branded case, while the app’s pedometer registers flips and turns. The better the person performs, the more points they tally, which can be redeemed against discounts at the online store. A social element adds participants to a leaderboard, with the best skater earning full sponsorship. What better way to reach teenagers, who will dutifully save up to buy new skating gear, than to make it about bettering their skills?

Brands are slowly cottoning on to the fact that touching a competitive nerve and gamifying interactions can not only generate positive results, but exposure that no advertising budget can buy. Similarly, Czech sports retailer Intersport, asked customers to download its app and run in the shape of its logo (an “I” and an “S”) in exchange for in-store discounts. For every kilometre run, fans earned 1% off their next purchase. To put it simply, the more effort they made, the bigger the discount.

UK loungewear label OnePiece meanwhile, reduced the price of its onesie by one penny every time someone tweeted the #HackthePrice hashtag. But it was only those who went through the effort to tweet that could reap the benefits of the reward.

hack_the_price_web

Marks & Spencer’s recently launched Sparks scheme is another great example of putting behaviour above spending. Customers are able to tailor their rewards, and receive points for doing things such as leaving online reviews. Most importantly, participating in the retailer’s ‘schwopping’ scheme, by recycling unwanted clothes, earns more reward points than simply purchasing an item in-store. This way, the store is encouraging good deeds while reinforcing its green ethos – a win-win situation.

An invested and engaged customer, who participates, gives feedback and shares, is one in a million, and acknowledging that is key. “Loyalty is the wrong word to use, it’s about a new relationship with customers – recognition, relevance, tailored, and a conversation,” commented Suzanna Broer, M&S insights and loyalty director, in an interview with Retail Week. “We want to go beyond generic discounts.”

This is not to say that it is the end for traditional points-based loyalty schemes. Ignoring valuable purchase and online search history data would be an unthinkable idea. But having the long-term mentality that in order to get people to buy from you, you must first get them to like and want to interact with you, is a no-brainer. Dangling the proverbial carrot in front of the paying customer, who is already in a state of ‘yes’, is no longer enough. It is time to recognise those who are willing to invest time and effort – they’re a hot ticket for conversion and your biggest future advocates.

Bia Bezamat is an innovation consultant at retail trends consultancy GDR Creative Intelligence.

Comment Counts is a series of opinion pieces from experts within the industry. Do you have something to say? Get in touch via info@fashionandmash.com.