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business digital snippets e-commerce product social media Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: Tim Cook on AR for fashion, the future of visual search, open sustainability

Apple CEO Tim Cook on the future of AR for fashion
Apple CEO Tim Cook

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past week.


TOP STORIES
  • Apple’s Tim Cook on the future of fashion and shopping [Vogue]
  • Retailers continue to experiment with visual search [Glossy]
  • Fashion needs an open-source sustainability solution [BoF]
  • Alibaba to spend $15 billion exploring ‘moonshot’ projects [Bloomberg]

BUSINESS
  • Giorgio Armani speaks on restructuring and succession plans [BoF]
  • Coach is changing its name to Tapestry [Bloomberg]
  • How Supreme grew a $1 billion business with a secret partner [BoF]

SOCIAL MEDIA & MARKETING
  • Fashion week engagements on Instagram nearly tripled compared to February’s fashion month [AdWeek]
  • Snapchat is twice as popular as Instagram when it comes to teens’ favourite social apps [AdWeek]
  • Will Dove’s ‘Pepsi moment’ affect the brand in the long term? [The Drum]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Walmart and Target are banding with Google to take on Amazon [AdWeek]
  • Black Friday shoppers more likely than ever to go online this year [Retail Dive]
  • ASOS launches same-day delivery service [The Industry]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Mastercard offers first checkout option for VR with Swarovski [AdAge]
  • What Sephora knows about women in tech that Silicon Valley doesn’t [WSJ]
  • Marie Claire and Mastercard showcase the future of shopping [BrandChannel]

PRODUCT
  • What goes into making an earth-friendly $68 pair of jeans at Everlane [Bloomberg]
  • Spider silk and stem-cell leather are the future of fashion [Engadget]
  • Stella McCartney is pioneering synthetic spider silk in high fashion [QZ]
  • Kering announces 2017 sustainable winners [FashionUnited]

START-UPS
  • With the launch of a lower-price subscription service, how Rent the Runway’s ‘closet in the cloud’ is changing the face of sustainability [Fashionista]
  • Digital closet start-ups want to give you the Cher Horowitz experience [Racked]
Categories
business data digital snippets Editor's pick film product social media Startups technology

What you missed: Fashion-tech education, Burberry’s see-now buy-now plans, Dior bags on WeChat

Burberry see-now buy-now fashion
Burberry’s first see-now buy-now campaign

One of the most interesting things about taking a decent summer break, and particularly one in August, is observing what happens during that time. Traditionally still the month that most of Europe closes down, it is also the time just before fashion weeks begin again and therefore the perfect opportunity for quiet on the news front full stop. We’ve certainly noticed that with regards to digital campaigns or tech stories over the past six years that Fashion & Mash has been running. And yet, not so much this year…

August 2016 proved busier than ever in terms of news in this space, ranging from Burberry’s new see-now buy-now campaign to Kate Spade’s wearables launch, Dior’s WeChat moves and various new high-tech store openings. What that does of course is continue to prove the relevancy of this world to the industry’s growth and success.

Read on for a full breakdown of what you might have missed…

PS. We’ve rebranded our regular “Digital Snippets” series to this “What you missed” feature in a bid to bring you a broader range of relevant stories, as well as a breakdown by category to make your consumption that much easier. Note: this version includes a month’s worth of links – normal weekly service will now resume. 

PPS. A new must-read site/newsletter in this space is LeanLuxe – edited by Paul Munford, and providing “stories, analysis, and opinion on the world of modern luxury business”.


TOP STORIES
  • Fashion needs a more robust approach to technology education [BoF]
  • Burberry reveals campaign it hopes will woo shoppers to first ‘straight-to-consumer’ collection [The Drum]
  • Dior in first with luxury WeChat handbags [China Daily]
  • Consumers prefer see now, buy now, wear now model, says Verdict [The Industry]

BUSINESS
  • Luxury armageddon: Even Chanel takes a hit as sales and profits plunge [Trendwalk]
  • Gucci among world’s hottest fashion brands, while Prada cools [BoF]
  • Prada sales slide as weak demand weighs on luxury-goods maker [Bloomberg]
  • Macy’s to shutter 100 stores as online players pressure brick-and-mortar [WWD]
  • How Demna Gvasalia is revolutionising Balenciaga from the inside out [Vogue]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Burberry sponsors Snapchat Lens for My Burberry Black launch [The Industry]
  • For Kit and Ace, Snapchat doubles as a TV channel and customer service assistant [Digiday]
  • Nike and others dive into Instagram Stories: why marketers already like it better than Snapchat [AdAge]
  • While some retailers ignore Snapchat, others are killing it with lens and geofilter ads [AdWeek]
  • Snapchat found a way to bring its ads to the real world [QZ]
  • Burberry becomes first luxury brand to personalise on Pinterest [Marketing Week]
  • Grindr officially gets into the menswear game [Fashionista]
  • Chatbots are thriving on the Kik chat app [Business Insider]

RETAIL
  • Westfield’s new World Trade Center mall puts in-store tech centre stage [Glossy]
  • Sephora’s Chicago store has new, high-tech look [Chicago Tribune]
  • After digital spree, retailers spending on stores again [WWD]
  • Malls aren’t dying. They’re changing [Racked]
  • Retailers look to high tech to engage visitors to their store [Journal Sentinel]
  • London is getting the first YouTube store, where online video stars can sell merchandise to the public [PSFK]
  • Retailers like J Crew are obsessed with data. (And it’s killing your shopping experience.) [LeanLuxe]
  • Neiman Marcus launches high-tech sunglass try-on mirror [WWD]

ADVERTISING
  • Watch Spike Jonze’s electrifying short film for Kenzo [Dazed]
  • Kate Hudson makes her new Fabletics spot ‘feel like you’re scrolling through her Instagram feed’ [AdWeek]
  • Cotton Inc.’s interactive video ad lets viewers determine how a day plays out [AdWeek]
  • L’Oreal celebrates diversity and targets men with new ‘Truly Yours’ positioning [The Drum]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Fashion’s fourth industrial revolution [BoF]
  • Kate Spade’s new wearable tech collection is fun and full of personality [Wareable]
  • Wearable technology: Amazon’s next big step? [Trendwalk]
  • Adidas ups athleisure-technology ante with Atlanta Speedfactory announcement [Trendwalk]
  • What 3D printing means for fashion [BoF]
  • Why STEM subjects and fashion design go hand in hand [The Conversation]
  • Athleta goes beyond wicking with new technical fabric [Glossy]
  • Cotton Inc. bonds with Nanotex on Dry Inside technology [WWD]
  • The MIT lab that’s quietly pioneering fashion for everyone [Co.Design]

START-UPS
  • Ignored by LVMH, Richemont, and Kering, modern luxury upstarts gain traction with Silicon Valley [LeanLuxe]
  • Eureka! John Lewis’ TrueStart deal to boost brave new tech world [Trendwalk]
  • This New York-based start-up accelerator is supporting the next generation of retail disruptors [Fashionista]
  • Topshop throws its weight behind wearables [Co.Design]
  • Start-ups in Target’s Techstars accelerator race to finish line [Star Tribune]
Categories
business e-commerce

ShopStyle: Expansion takes it from search to digital marketplace

popsugar-800x508

For anyone who’s a regular user of the ShopStyle fashion search platform (and I’m one), there’s an interesting development due in Q2 as it transforms into a fashion marketplace with the launch of new shopping cart service, ShopStyle Checkout.

Parent company Popsugar said the aim is to enable consumers to purchase products from multiple retail partners in a single seamless transaction using one login.

The launch will be via ShopStyle’s iOS app and it will roll out across all the brand’s platform’s as well as 14,000 ShopStyle Collective influencer sites by year-end, Popsugar said.

Popsugar doesn’t intend that ShopStyle becomes an actual retailer itself, and the retail partners it signs up will remain the ‘merchant of record’.

So far it’s named a number of partners, including big hitters like Topshop and River Island, Target, Neiman Marcus and Yoox.com.

It could be pretty amazing – it will launch with over 3.4m products and expects to have over 100 retailers on board by the end of this year.

It’s certainly got a dynamic team behind it. Popsugar is one of those businesses that grew out of the digital revolution. Founded a decade ago as a blog by husband and wife Brian and Lisa Sugar, the media and tech company targeting millennial women is profitable and now has combined visitor traffic of 100m.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

Categories
business e-commerce Editor's pick

Welcome to Cyber Sunday: E-tail will never be the same again

la-redoute

Cyber Monday is now Cyber Sunday. That’s official. Well, at least as far as Walmart is concerned. The company is going to launch its Cyber Monday deals a day early this year.

Why? Is the retail giant-of-giants regretting pulling back from Black Friday now that the momentum is really building, or is this a logical move that simply reflects reality? Maybe a bit of both.

Walmart.com CEO Fernando Madeira pointed out the logic of changing tack. “The customers have changed but Cyber Monday hasn’t changed with them,” he told Reuters. “Now everyone has [the] internet.”

The fact is that Cyber Monday is no longer the year’s biggest online shopping day. China’s Singles Day has taken that crown and in some markets like the UK, Black Friday beat it last year too. Even in the US, the gap is closing with Adobe predicting $3bn in online sales on Monday but as much as $2.7bn on Friday.

It used to be that Americans got back to their offices on the Monday after Thanksgiving and took advantage of all those new-fangled computers and the high speed wifi they found there to go shopping. Seems almost funny now.

What it means as far as Walmart is concerned is that instead of the smattering of teaser deals it offered on the same Sunday last year, there’ll be 2,000 online-only specials available from 8pm.

The power of online

The move to Cyber Sunday also reflects a wider online-driven trend that sees retailers deciding when is the best time to offer deals and knowing that their smartphone-toting customers will be ready.

Black Friday is still key, of course, as its timing is perfect for Christmas shopping. But the rise of online shopping has shifted the shopping event scenery to create alternative Black Fridays at other times. Amazon has proved that with its Amazon Prime Days earlier in the year. Alibaba has proved it with Singles Day on November 11.

The onward march of online has also changed Black Friday itself and we’re seeing proof of that this year with a whole load of tweaks to usual retailer behaviour over Black Friday/Cyber Monday, of which Walmart’s move is the highest-profile.

Why is the change happening so fast in a world where e-sales are still the smallest percentage of total sales? Currently, more than 92% of total US retail sales still happen in physical stores and in Britain, the figure is still around 90%. But for both countries, online is a disproportionately large force in special shopping events like Black Friday. In the UK, for instance, over a third of the near-£2bn likely to be spent on the day will be online.

And that gives retailers the chance to extend the event on their websites as they’re not bound by shoppers’ abilities to get to stores. In fact, a lot of retailers launched Black Friday early this year with plenty of deals available last week and this week even more.

In France, where physical retail is still reeling from the Paris attacks, online is also changing the landscape and Black Friday is morphing too. La Redoute, which said the Friday-through-Sunday period was its second biggest shopping weekend in 2014 (as pictured), has renamed it Le Grand Weekend. But despite the use of the word “weekend”, its deals start today and end next Monday.

So whatever happens on Black Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday or Friday and Cyber Saturday, Sunday or Monday, one thing we know is that shopping will never be the same again.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

Categories
e-commerce Editor's pick mobile technology

Are we really going to shop from the Apple Watch? What retail apps are trying to achieve

applewatch

When Apple makes a major announcement like a move into the wearables category, it’s guaranteed a long line of other businesses will jump on board any which way they can; aiming for success by association with relevant launches of their own.

Needless to say there were multiple new apps created in time for the Apple Watch hitting stores in April on that very basis. 3,500 to be precise. Retail is one of the key categories within that, with Target, Asos, Amazon, JC Penney and Marks & Spencer just some examples of those who introduced new applications specifically.

Many of these brands aren’t normally what we’d consider early movers in such a tech game. So what are they trying to achieve? Are such efforts merely about benefitting from the media coverage likely to follow, or do they actually think there’s potential to be shopping from our wrists?

Head over to Forbes.com for my full story exploring the answers to those questions.

Categories
e-commerce Editor's pick mobile technology

Are we over the next big thing? Omnichannel’s reality bites at Shop.org Summit

This post first appeared on WGSN.com/blogs

shoporg

The US digital retail crowd hit Seattle this week for the National Retail Federation’s annual e-commerce event, the Shop.org Summit.

Once a must-attend event for cutting-edge insights on what newness was coming out of the online retail space, this year felt like a repeat of many strategies we’ve heard before: the importance of mobile, the push for omnichannel, the overwhelming plethora of data.

Perhaps it was merely a sign of our industry and how it’s merged: having a separate brick and mortar conference in January (NRF Big Show) and a digital version in October when we live in an increasing omnichannel world, is starting to seem redundant.

Was is still worth attending? Yes. But retail’s tech rockstars seemed to have moved on from the speaker floor this year, leaving us with a series of sessions that felt like they were designed to enlighten the troops rather than inspire the next generation of e-commerce strategists. It was for the doers rather than the thinkers. But maybe, for US retail, that’s exactly where we’re at; in the trenches executing on omnichannel more than merely talking about it.

Those who attended may have come for innovation, but actually what they got was an agenda otherwise driven pretty heavily by the news. Alibaba’s swift movement into the US and its recent IPO on the New York Stock Exchange leading to a valuation of $231bn, made way for a focus on marketplace disruptions and debates about the Chinese giant and its Amazon and eBay counterparts.

The emergence of Apple Pay, another unsurprising one, meant discussion around what all is happening with mobile payments, where we expect that to go, and when we need to really be thinking about it.

Macy’s recently announced plans to introduce 4,000 beacons similarly led to talk on beacons on the expo floor. Confirmations from other big stores including Kohl’s and The North Face of forthcoming trials especially in the run up to Holiday only added to this.

With this most important season of retail just ahead of us, it’s perhaps inevitable the focus was on the execution of new technologies rather than finding the next big thing. It’s just a shame in a town that’s home to Amazon, Starbucks and Nordstrom there wasn’t also something that might at least inspire it.

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social media technology Uncategorized

Facebook Graph Search will prove key for local retailers

Facebook Graph Search in action, as seen on Mashable

The web is abuzz today with discussion around Facebook’s Graph Search, its new in-built social search system based on the data it’s been able to gather from all us users over the past eight years.

Safe to say, it marks an interesting move for the platform, and one that’s likely to impact significantly on all businesses alike, but particularly such consumer-facing ones as fashion brands and retailers.

If you’re a local boutique for instance, there’s no time like the present to make sure all your info is up-to-date, you’re doing everything you can to increase your following, and you’re thinking more than ever about how to stand out from the competition. It seems those who interact and engage with their fans the most, will be the ones that appear at the top of search results.

Here’s a good synopsis of what it’s about from Mashable: Facebook Graph Search could be its greatest innovation

And some nice comments from various industry experts over at Econsultancy: Facebook’s Graph Search: what does it mean for marketers?

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mobile technology Uncategorized

Site and mobile optimisation key for online retailers in 2013

Online retailers in the US will prioritise site optimisation, mobile and tablets in 2013, according to a new report from Forrester Research in conjunction with Shop.org.

The State of Retailing Online 2013 (SORO) study shows the aim will be to “improve the customer experience and increase web conversion and loyalty across all devices”.

Over half (51%) of those surveyed cited site optimisation as key, referencing a focus on checkout optimisation, alternative payments, user experience, testing, and product detail page enhancements.

Meanwhile, 43% outlined that they would be focusing on mobile and tablets this year, investing in new or improved mobile apps and mobile-optimised sites, analytics, and traffic and conversion growth.

Shop.org executive director Vicki Cantrell, said: “While direct mobile commerce is still small, mobile services are now an established and significant part of the shopping experience. Retailers this year are smartly investing to create a holistic customer experience across stores, desktop, and mobile to improve conversion rates, grow crucial repeat customer business, and even capture their share of customer demand from international markets.”

Categories
digital snippets e-commerce film social media technology Uncategorized

Digital snippets: NYFW, F-commerce, Christian Louboutin, Louis Vuitton, Marni, Nike

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

  • Jason Wu, Diane von Furstenberg, Marc Jacobs and Michael Kors prove most “talked” about in online space during NYFW [WWD]
  • Retailers shut their Facebook stores; is this the end of F-commerce? [Mashable]
  • Neiman Marcus launches social media challenge for Christian Louboutin’s 20th anniversary [Luxury Daily]
  • Louis Vuitton sets short film series on major cities, starting with Hong Kong (as pictured) [WWD]
  • Nike introduces Nike+ basketball sneaker with high-tech sensors [AllThingsD]
  • Sølve Sundsbø’s The Ever Changing Face of Beauty installation becomes interactive iPad App [The Business of Fashion]
  • Google to start selling glasses that will project information, entertainment and ads onto the lenses [NYTimes]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Salvatore Ferragamo, House of Fraser, Pinterest, Pose

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

  • Ferragamo lets shoppers pre-order runway looks through digital trunk show [Luxury Daily]
  • PR company KCD launches online-only fashion shows for busy editors [On the Runway]
  • House of Fraser targets students through social media [Brand Republic]
  • The year in e-tail: lessons learned and looking ahead [WWD]
  • Pinterest becomes top traffic driver for retailers [Mashable]
  • Pose launches Facebook app enabling users to track looks via Timeline [PSFK]