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What you missed: Warby Parker’s face mapping, Black Friday plans, Amazon Go is ready to go

Warby Parker's face mapping
Warby Parker’s face mapping

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past week.


TOP STORIES
  • Warby Parker’s app is cleverly using the iPhone X’s face mapping to recommend glasses [TheVerge]
  • Why REI and Modcloth will close on Black Friday, and prosper [RetailDive]
  • Amazon’s cashierless store is almost ready for prime time [Bloomberg]
  • The industry remembers Azzedine Alaïa [BoF]
  • Tech titans José Neves and Ian Rogers on the future of luxury fashion [Evening Standard]

BUSINESS
  • Shoppers expected to spend £10bn during Black Friday bonanza [TheIndustry]
  • Stitch Fix’s highly anticipated IPO was ¯_(?)_/¯ [QZ]
  • Farfetch losses grow despite skyrocketing revenue [Retail Gazette]
  • Will the year of ‘the drop’ change fashion forever? [Fashionista]
  • Is the second wave of sustainability finally here? [Refinery29]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Inside Snapchat’s battle to win back its momentum [BoF]

MARKETING
  • Australian department store tells the sweet Christmas tale of an expat gingerbread man [AdWeek]
  • Keira Knightley sings in French for Chanel Coco Crush campaign [The Impression]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Amazon’s last mile [Gizmodo]
  • Amazon could be worth $1 trillion in 2018 [RetailDive]
  • Spotify expands merch to beauty products [TechCrunch]
  • Rituals is overhauling its app to compete with the likes of Amazon, but it’s treading carefully [TheDrum]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Alibaba’s AI fashion consultant helps achieve record-setting sales [MIT Technology Review]
  • Poshmark builds a styling tool for Amazon’s Alexa powered devices [Internet Retailer]
  • How brands and start-ups are using AI to help you get dressed [Fashionista]
  • Vogue US partners with Apple on augmented reality feature [BoF]

PRODUCT
  • Fashion’s interest in alternative fabrics keeps growing [NY Times]
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business digital snippets e-commerce film mobile product social media Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: Farfetch photography, questioning Everlane’s transparency, Amazon as the largest apparel seller

Farfetch digital shoot listings fashion retail technology
Farfetch

The Wall Street Journal has a deep-dive story on just what it takes to produce all the imagery for Farfetch’s listed boutiques. Every weekday, it posts an average of more than 1,000 new listings, each with at least five different photographs. Alongside that, perhaps appropriately, comes a new set of stats about Amazon, proving the fact it’s expected to surpass Macy’s to become the biggest apparel seller in the US next year.

Sustainability is also top of mind within the industry of late, with lots of ongoing thoughts around Everlane’s transparency claims and Patagonia’s slow fashion aims. Also worth reading this week are various Snapchat campaigns, not to mention some insights on the pros and cons of retail technology. Don’t forget to also sign up for our Snapchat Masterclass before the early bird rate ends on Oct 31.


TOP STORIES
  • Where luxury fashion is a high-speed, high-volume business – on site with the photography crew at Farfetch [WSJ]
  • Radical transparency: Are H&M and Zara actually more transparent than Everlane? [The Fashion Law]
  • Amazon is expected to surpass Macy’s to become the biggest apparel seller in the US next year [Business Insider]
  • Vine video-sharing app to be shut down by Twitter [The Guardian]
  • Alibaba takes Singles’ Day to global buyers, sellers [China Daily]

BUSINESS
  • Sales surge at Kering’s Gucci, slip at sister brand [Yahoo]
  • American innovation: 5 questions with Shinola CMO Bridget Russo [BrandChannel]
  • How Outdoor Voices founder Tyler Haney plans to grow the brand into the next Nike [Fashionista]
  • In an age of fast fashion, Patagonia is going slow [Yahoo]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Following the screenshots: How Topshop is hacking Snapchat [Digiday]
  • Everlane’s social strategy: drive community engagement, not sales [Glossy]
  • Why Snapchat is winning out over Pinterest for River Island [The Drum]
  • H&M and Kenzo leverage iOS iMessage integration [Glossy]

ADVERTISING
  • REI’s ‘#OptOutside’ returns, and other brands have joined to help make it a new American tradition [Creativity]
  • Target channels Hamilton and The Nutcracker for holiday campaign aimed at Hispanic shoppers [AdWeek]

RETAIL
  • How AI is helping retailers [Venture Beat]
  • When it comes to retail technology, the industry is ‘just getting started’ [NRF]
  • Retail websites pile on the ad tech, but may be repeating publishers’ mistakes [AdAge]
  • Understanding China’s e-commerce and Internet sectors: A guide for global retailers [FBIC]
  • Why Alibaba just staged an 8-hour fashion show [Fortune]

TECHNOLOGY
  • This connected jacket provides VIP access to exclusive NYC experiences, demos future of the Internet of Things [Forbes]
  • The gift and the curse of 3D printing and the legislation we can expect [The Fashion Law]
  • You can now get styled by a fashion-savvy algorithm [Quartz]
  • Google Voice Search comparison-shops on mobile, creating audio ad opportunity [MediaPost]

START-UPS
  • How the Techstars + Target accelerator transformed retail start-up Blueprint Registry [Retail Dive]
  • Is Silicon Valley taking menswear more seriously? [Fast Company]
  • At ThirdLove, just one area of innovation isn’t enough [Medium]

UPCOMING EVENTS
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business data digital snippets e-commerce film mobile technology

What you missed: Luxury on Amazon, understanding data, Nike’s Mark Parker

Luxury is resistant to selling on Amazon
Luxury is resistant to selling on Amazon

The big news this week surrounds the ongoing resistance from luxury to sell on Amazon. Jean-Jacques Guiony, CFO of LVMH, said last week, there is “no way” it would do business with Amazon. “We believe that the existing business of Amazon… doesn’t fit our luxury, full stop, but also doesn’t fit with our brands,” he explained.

Quartz writer Marc Bain has a great overview on this. As he starts his story: “Next year [Amazon is] expected to become the biggest apparel seller in the US, and it boasts an enviable customer base for higher-end brands”. Yet of course, it also presents the problem of being too accessible and not reflective of the high quality customer experience luxury brands are aiming for online – many of them only recently.

Meanwhile, also worth reading this week is a piece on Nike’s Mark Parker and his view on imagination, innovation and art, another on how tech hubs are helping luxury brands return to their roots, and one on the way in which artificial intelligence is changing retail forever. If that wasn’t enough, be sure to also check out new campaigns from Abercrombie & Fitch through to Patagonia.


TOP STORIES
  • Is it even possible to sell “luxury” on Amazon? [QZ]
  • Fashion marketing is failing to understand data [Glossy]
  • Nike’s Mark Parker on imagination, innovation and art [Another]
  • How Silicon Valley (and other global tech hubs) are helping luxury return to its roots [LeanLuxe]
  • Number of Europeans using mobile payments triples, Visa study finds [Internet Retailing]

BUSINESS
  • How Brexit is set to affect how we shop [Daily Telegraph]
  • How do you sell a $6,000 bag your customer can’t touch? [QZ]
  • In stagnant luxury market, luggage brands roll on [BoF]

ADVERTISING
  • Abercrombie & Fitch tries on a new attitude: friendly [WSJ]
  • New Patagonia short film shows how fair trade shopping is good for business [Co.Create]
  • In REI’s tearjerker, people carry out a fellow hiker’s lifelong dream in tribute to his life [AdWeek]
  • Longchamp takes virtual stroll through Paris to mark boutique renovation [Luxury Daily]
  • Avon calling: #BeautyBoss campaign reboots brand [BrandChannel]

RETAIL
  • How artificial intelligence is changing online retail forever [TechCrunch]
  • Karen Millen launches B2B-only tech concept store [Decoded Fashion]
  • British Telecom launches connected store concept [Decoded Fashion]

TECHNOLOGY
  • We’re getting closer to clothing made entirely by robots [QZ]
  • How mobile is transforming product search — and why voice may be next [Retail Dive]
  • Alibaba’s new payment system lets virtual reality shoppers pay by nodding [Reuters]
  • VR is where my fashion dreams can become reality [The Verge]
  • Silkworms spin super-silk after eating carbon nanotubes and graphene [Scientific American]
  • Elle’s augmented reality experiment: fad or future of media? [WWD]

UPCOMING EVENTS
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Retail and technology battle it out as the big winners at this year’s Cannes Lions

Cannes Lions
Cannes Lions 2016

If you’re not yet sure of the role technology plays in the future of our industry – or any industry – just look at the Grand Prix winners at this year’s Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity.

Virtual reality, artificial intelligence, wearables and data visualisation all got a nod. There was a VR film from The New York Times sweeping up both top awards in the entertainment and mobile categories; the use of data to create The Next Rembrandt for ING Bank taking the cyber and creative data titles; and AlphaGo artificial intelligence beating the world’s best human player of Go, winning for innovation.

Even fashion got a look in with Google Project Jacquard picked up the Grand Prix in the product design category for the launch of its interactive textile technology. Levi’s was introduced as founding partner, which has since led to the introduction of a smart jean jacket for urban cyclists.

The big winners otherwise were far more traditional in concept, though heavily weighted to those in the retail and apparel industries for once. REI, Under Armour, John Lewis, Harvey Nichols and Toms all walked away with top prizes.

Outdoor retailer REI won the coveted Titanium Grand Prix (as well as the promo & activation title) for its #OptOutside campaign, which took the US by surprise on its biggest shopping day, Black Friday, when it shut all its stores and invited consumers to head outside instead. By taking a stand against the chaos of shopping straight after Thanksgiving, REI was also able to share its value that a life outside is a life well lived.

Sir John Hegarty, founder of BBH, and jury president for the Titanium category at Cannes Lions, said: “We were looking to credit something that has gone beyond; that’s perhaps daring, courageous and different. This involves all of those things. Lots of things are advertising, what we loved about this idea was how profound it was as a thought, and how daring it was to carry it through.”

Over 170 organisations showed support for the idea, with many of them also closing their doors in solidarity. The campaign, created by Venables Bell & Partners, earned 33 straight days of media coverage with 6.7 billion impressions, while the #OptOutside hashtag also generated 1.2 billion social impressions.

Under Armour meanwhile won in the film craft category for its Rule Yourself campaign by Droga5. A celebration of the fact US Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps has come out of retirement to compete for gold again, it shows the hard work put into training in a relentless pursuit of sporting greatness. The film outlines the brand message: “It’s what you do in the dark that puts you in the light.”

In the film category overall, Harvey Nichols also followed up on the success of its Sorry I Spent it on Myself campaign from 2014 (which won four Grand Prix awards), and won this time around for its Shoplifters spot. Created by adam&eveDDB to launch the luxury retailer’s new loyalty app, it uses real CCTV footage of thieves getting caught in the act, albeit with animated cartoon heads protecting their identity.

As jury president Joe Alexander, CCO of The Martin Agency, said: “What’s funny is this film is actually really ugly, but it does what great filmmaking and storytelling does, it brought to life an idea.”

Given the fact retail is a struggling sector at present, it’s always a positive thing when a piece of work is awarded for the impact it actually has on the business; the sales or ROI it leads to. On that basis, John Lewis won in the Creative Effectiveness category for a second year this year, this time for its Monty the Penguin campaign from 2014 (which won the Grand Prix in film craft in 2015).

Another by adam&eveDDB, this two minute Christmas film was viewed 29m times across YouTube, Facebook and Twitter, over 6m of which were before the advert even aired on TV. Better yet, the Monty merchandise sales generated alone paid for the campaign, while sales across the department store rose a record 5.8% on Christmas 2013. Econometrics showed that advertising was the single biggest factor driving this growth, accounting for nearly 25% of all sales. In all, the 2014 Christmas campaign generated £132m worth of extra sales and £33m of extra profit.

A special award also went to Toms founder Blake Mycoskie. The Cannes LionHeart recognises an individual who has innovatively harnessed commercial brand power to make a significant and positive difference to people or the planet. Said Terry Savage, chairman of Lions Festivals: “Blake’s unstoppable passion and commitment has driven him to create a brand model that has made a positive impact on millions of people’s lives across the world. His vision to develop a new kind of conscious consumerism has transformed into a global movement.”

toms

Overall, it was a great year for the industry at Cannes Lions, with other winners including Nike, adidas, Canada Goose and Björn Borg all winning gold awards, as well as Forever21, H&M, Issey Miyake, Pacific Brands, David Jones and Puma scooping silvers.

But there’s something to be said here too about the division between tradition and technology being seen in the Grand Prix names. What we need now is for those two to combine; for the retail and apparel vertical to gracefully integrate technology to develop even more award-winning work. But importantly to do so with a heavy dose of creativity, and not just gratuity.

As Hegarty said: “We’ve got to remember that technology enables opportunity, but it’s creativity that enables value. We say to clients [they] must not under invest in that, that’s what’s really important; that’s what will lead to success.”

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data digital snippets e-commerce social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: L’Oréal’s incubator, Bolt Threads teams with Patagonia, confessions of a social media exec

loreal-digital-600

There are lots of updates this past week on interesting textile developments – from the spider silk of Bolt Threads to Spiber, both of which have announced new deals with Patagonia and The North Face respectively. Also worth a read is the anonymous social media exec spilling secrets to Digiday, not to mention the idea that we will all indeed be buying our designer clothing in the future on Amazon. If that’s not enough, further fashion and tech news from the past fortnight spans Birchbox’s use of Facebook Live to a breakdown of how brands are using Snapchat. Read on for all…


  • L’Oréal invests in Founders Factory digital start-up incubator [BrandChannel]

  • Bolt Threads raises $50 million to brew spider silk, inks deal with Patagonia [TechCrunch]

  • Confessions of a social media exec on influencer marketing: ‘We threw too much money at them’ [Digiday]

  • People will eventually buy their designer clothing on Amazon, because they buy everything there [Quartz]

  • Everlane’s Shoe Park interactive pop-up offers self-guided shopping [Footwear News]

  • How Birchbox uses Facebook Live videos to engage consumers [Retail Dive]

  • How Frank + Oak built a modern loyalty program for men [Glossy]

  • Google DeepMind killed off a little-known fashion website [Business Insider]

  • SpaceX has hired a legendary costume designer to create their own spacesuits [Gizmodo]

  • The North Face to sell parka made out of synthetic spider silk by Japanese start-up Spiber [Bloomberg]

  • Thesis Couture is bringing the engineering savvy of rocket science to the design of the high-heeled shoe [The Atlantic]

  • The rise of robot tailors [Glossy]

  • L’Oréal created this training program to keep its marketers on the cutting edge [AdWeek]

  • How fashion and retail brands are using Snapchat [Fashionista]

  • Will the ‘sharing economy’ work for fashion? [BoF]

  • Bots, Messenger and the future of customer service [TechCrunch]

  • Condé Nast is launching a beauty network [Racked]

  • How a data scientist (who studied astrophysics) ended up in fashion [Fashionista]

  • Infographic: here’s how Gen Z girls prefer to shop and socialise online [AdWeek]

  • What is going on with fashion and zines? [Racked]

  • How online shopping is cannabilising mall stores [Associated Press]

  • REI’s ‘#OptOutside’ Black Friday campaign wins award [AdAge]
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digital snippets e-commerce Editor's pick mobile Startups technology

Digital snippets: Every key fashion story you need to read from #SXSW

IMG_3076

It might be an event dedicated to technologists first and foremost, but there’s no escaping the role of branding and marketing at SXSW Interactive these days, and the fashion industry has inserted itself well and truly as a relevant vertical within that.

From SXstyle to numerous off-schedule events, there were more dedicated fashion and retail-related panels than ever, not to mention numerous pop-up activations dedicated to the future of this area.

Whether you weren’t able to make it to Austin, or indeed were on the ground but overwhelmed by the madness (weren’t we all!), here’s a comprehensive round-up of everything that went on by way of the top stories to read. Note the absence of wearables this year by the way…

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business e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Digging in to Reddit: does it work for fashion brands and retailers?

reddit

Late last week, Intel’s Sandra Lopez teamed up with Rebecca Minkoff for a conversation on social news site Reddit. The “AMA” (Ask Me Anything) encouraged users to pose questions about the roles of fashion and technology intertwining, as well as the opportunities for millennial women in STEM fields.

It was a strong example of something that worked on the platform – native to how its users operate, and filled with personal responses (from how Lopez and Minkoff got started in their careers, to how they managed their work/life balance, and why men never get asked that question).

Self-proclaimed as ‘the frontpage of the internet’, Reddit has a reported 202 million unique visitors a month. During 2015, it saw 82.54 billion page views across 88,700 active subreddits (sub forums). There were 73.15 million submissions, with 725.85 million comments made by 8.7 million total authors.

Risky business

The Intel/Minkoff example is one of many AMAs, but it’s still one of few of fashion brands and retailers really getting involved.

The uncensored and unpredictable nature of the site goes some way to explaining why. The platform was designed to be a space where like-minded individuals communicate without interference. Reddit is open source and moderated by unpaid volunteers. Users, known as “redditors”, create threads called subreddits, which other members with similar interests can join.

Initially the company had just five rules: “Don’t spam; Don’t ask for votes or engage in vote manipulation; Don’t post personal information; No child pornography or sexually suggestive content featuring minors; Don’t break the site or do anything that interferes with normal use of the site.” The lack of rules and regulations, fostered an “anything goes” culture that still defines Reddit today.

For a brand, therefore, entering a community like Reddit can be risky.

RedditAMA_Intel_RebeccaMinkoff

Frequent changes of senior management has done little to improve Reddit’s volatile reputation. Three different leaders have been in place over the past three years: Yishan Wong, Ellen Pao and Steve Huffman respectively, all with very different objectives. Pao’s 2014 strategy to clean up the darker side of Reddit and remove the less savoury elements for instance – like banning subreddits “fatpeoplehate” and “hamplanethatred”, which focused on shaming overweight people – angered core members who felt Poa’s intentions went against the free-speech ethos of Reddit.

But needless to say, this did make it more appealing on the brand side. Around the same time, Nordstrom created Nordstrom1901, the official Nordstrom subbreddit, to communicate with customers after noticing increased activity surrounding the brand on the platform. Nordstrom’s first post encapsulated the relaxed, genuine attitude Reddit users appreciate. “We are Redditors at heart and can’t wait to get to know the communities better. We’re here to help so questions, comments, etc. are all welcome,” it read.

Focusing on service and avoiding aggressive marketing, Nordstrom received a warm Reddit welcome. AMAs proved particularly popular. Real-time feedback also allowed Nordstrom to navigate any minor issues before they escalated into larger problems. Their venture onto Reddit appeared fruitful, so it’s unclear why Nordstrom1901 has been abandoned (the last official Nordstrom1901 post was 11 months ago). Often such moves come down to the advocate for a specific platform no longer being in the business, but it’s also likely a change of strategy was at play; if ROI wasn’t proving fruitful from the platform, resources could easily have been allocated elsewhere.

Ensuring authenticity

One brand that has converted conversation into revenue through Reddit is Uniqlo. Speaking to Marketing Land, Uniqlo’s e-commerce manager, Arielle Dyda (who manages the retailer’s Reddit involvement), explained that it now drives more traffic and revenue for the retailer than any other social channel.

Its efforts started on the platform in 2012 after traffic from Reddit crashed the soft launch of its e-commerce site. Today, 5% of its referral traffic comes from social media, with 64% of that from Reddit. Of the 3% of monthly sales from social media, 64% is also from Reddit. On a day when Dyda posts about a special deal, it can drive up to 20% of their online sales.

One particular subreddit – r/MaleFashionAdvice – is particularly fruitful, and Uniqlo isn’t even the most mentioned brand on there:

Reddit_malefashionadvice

The key to Uniqlo success surrounds authenticity, transparency and excellent customer service, says Dyda. She focuses on being real, but also on being playful. It helps that she uses her personal Reddit account, midnight1214, tagged as an official company representative.

“So just being able to be a genuine person is important. I joke around with them, I post memes. I’m savvy with the Reddit lingo and that makes me one of them. I’m not just Uniqlo, I’m midnight1214, and I understand the jokes and I understand frustrations, but I’m going to be here to help you when you need it,” she explains. She also leans on the community’s moderators for help so as not to seem too promotional at times.

Spending time getting to know the platform, answering questions and contributing, without imposing corporate strategies or marketing campaigns, distinguished Uniqlo from other companies entering Reddit. Dyda adds: “I think if another band wants to jump in, they really have to take the time and learn and understand first of all what are people saying about your company [on there].”

By comparison, US-based, outdoor apparel company REI, conducted insufficient research when they attempted to join the platform. Misjudging the importance of authenticity, CEO Jerry Stritzke started the conversation by highlighting REI’s decision to close on Black Friday. Seemingly unaware of the distain of brands using the site for advertising and marketing, he wrote: “Hi Reddit. I’m Jerry Strizke, CEO of REI. You might have heard about us recently when we announced that we would be closing all of our stores on Black Friday this year. We’re paying our 12,000 employees to take the day off and we’re encouraging them to opt out of the Black Friday madness and spend the day outdoors with loved ones…Ask me anything!”

His comments were interpreted as a publicity drive, prompting a dramatic backlash of negativity. Redditor phD_in_Random said: “I’ve never even heard of this company and I hate it already. We don’t have one in my city and I hope we never do.”

Strizke also missed a number of contentious questions from current and former employees surrounding a membership sales scheme the company runs. Strizke failed to grasp that leaving the discussion early, didn’t mean the conversation was over, but rather gave the impression he was avoiding tougher issues. One comment in particular got so blown up (there were some 5,000 responses on the AMA in total), that he had to return to Reddit later to address it.

Unsurprisingly, there’s been no further activity on Reddit from REI.

Native advertising

Steve Huffman, one of the original founders of Reddit, returned as CEO in July 2015, shifting the focus from imposing a level of moral decency to expansion. He is in charge of the business side of Reddit, while co-founder Alexis Ohanian concentrates on editorial aspects like Upvoted, Reddit’s new publication.

Here, a small team of editors sifts through the most interesting posts, rewriting stories worthy of further development. It aims to put a spotlight on all the hundreds of conversations that otherwise get lost in the noise of the platform. It also proves an opportunity for Reddit itself to monetise, by offering brands a safer way to enter through its native advertising scheme.

Sponsored posts are likewise written by the editorial team, and designed to fit with the nature of the content rather than through traditional advertising banners. In the interest of transparency, Reddit made its intentions clear from the off: “We will be working with brands on sponsored content, all of which will be visibly distinguished as such.”

Going forward, the introduction of Upvoted reflects the positive changes at Reddit. There’s a deeper understanding that if the site is to reach its full potential, management must act responsibly. Initiatives like providing a help section with advice on “Brandiquette”, for brands thinking of advertising, makes the site much more approachable.

Brands in other industries including food, literature and music have accordingly reported positive results (case studies available). With that in mind, fashion brands and retailers will also look to consider Reddit as a suitable advertising partner in the future.

Needless to say, for any brand thinking about stepping into the Reddit world in the meantime, operating within the context of the site is paramount. With such a large audience available to tap into, and proven revenue drivers at play when handled correctly, the opportunity is almost too good not to.

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data digital snippets e-commerce social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Iris van Herpen on designing the future, TAG Heuer’s luxury smart watch, Alibaba’s Singles Day smashes records

Here’s a round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

irisvanherpen_ss16

  • Iris van Herpen’s astonishing designs don’t look like ‘clothes.’ They look like the future (as pictured) [The Washington Post]
  • TAG Heuer Connected: the first ‘legitimate’ smart watch? [Wired]
  • How Alibaba turned an obscure, made-up Chinese holiday into a $14.3 billion shopping extravaganza that’s bigger than Black Friday [Business Insider]
  • Dior breaks its e-commerce ban [WWD]
  • REI’s Reddit experience shows brands need to be ready to take the tough questions [AdWeek]
  • Canada Goose debuts first global campaign [AdAge]
  • High-tech Sephora flash boutique in Paris has a robot greeter [Brandchannel]
  • Farfetch tries to reach a little further [Bloomberg]
  • The Minkoffs want to disrupt the dictatorship in fashion with digital innovation [Fast Company]
  • Fashion platform Zalando wants to be Europe’s top tech company [Wired]
  • Macy’s CEO defends role of stores in e-commerce era [Fortune]
  • Apple’s Angela Ahrendts on where the company is taking retail next [Fast Company]
  • Natalie Massenet’s Imaginary Ventures proves she’s ready for next venture after exit from Net-a-Porter [Independent]
  • How Revolve Clothing uses data to create a global brand [Digiday]
  • Adam Selman, Rihanna’s favourite designer, enters the wearables war with Mastercard [NY Times]
  • As luxury brands embrace data, will they use it like a butler or a stalker [AdWeek]
  • Retail’s best Snapchat campaigns [L2]
  • Tel Aviv’s booming tech start-up community is expanding its focus to fashion [Fashionista]
  • Singapore’s postal service provider is developing a futuristic shopping mall to house online retailers [TechCrunch]
  • “People don’t buy stuff in actual stores” – the future of retail, as explained by Gen Z [Quartz]
  • Wary of the next ‘Warby Parker’ [TechCrunch]
  • Refinery29, Dazed and i-D battle for millennials [BoF]
  • Essena O’Neill quits Instagram, rewrites her self-promoting history [The Guardian]