Categories
business data digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media technology

ICYMI: Mary Meeker’s internet trends, Balenciaga’s t-shirt meme, drones at Walmart

Balenciaga - ICYMI mary meeker internet trends meme
Balenciaga

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Mary Meeker’s 2018 internet trends report: All the slides, plus analysis [Recode]
  • Balenciaga heard you like shirts, so they put a shirt on a t-shirt for $1,300 [Mashable]
  • Walmart’s future may include in-store drone assistants and smart shopping carts [CNBC]
  • How Natalie Massenet’s new VC firm sees the future of retail [Pitchbook]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Blockchain can help authenticate ownership of fashion goods [WWD]
  • Blockchain and beauty go together, according to Tev Finger [WWD]
  • AmEx pilots blockchain-based loyalty rewards with Boxed [RetailDive]
  • Google is actually pretty good at identifying what people are wearing [Racked]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • ‘Need it, text it, get it’: How concierge service Jetblack is aiming to beat Amazon Prime [Glossy]
  • How OPI is hacking Amazon and data algorithms to improve its online site [Glossy]
  • Lululemon hits record high on revamped stores [Reuters]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Snapchat launches its first Lens that reacts to sound [Engadget]
  • How Macy’s is using its store employees and stylists as Instagram influencers to drive sales [Glossy]
PRODUCT
  • ALYX’s Matthew M. Williams reveals data-inspired Nike capsule [HypeBeast]
  • Zac Posen’s new Delta uniforms are the ultimate high-performance outfits [FastCompany]
BUSINESS
  • The Gucci-Gap divide: How luxury is winning the race for millennial spend [BoF]
  • J.Crew will relaunch this fall [Racked]
  • The changing face of fashion PR [BoF]
Categories
social media

Infographic: This year’s $2m Victoria’s Secret Fantasy Bra reimagined in champagne, selfies and boob jobs

lily_VS_fantasybra

Victoria’s Secret Angel Lily Aldridge will wear this year’s Fantasy Bra at the brand’s annual fashion show tonight in New York. Worth $2 million, the piece includes 6,500 precious gems ranging from yellow sapphires to pink quartz and topaz, all set in 18-karat gold, alongside 375 carats of diamonds.

Called the “Fireworks Fantasy Bra”, it was designed by Geneva-based jeweler Mouawad, and took a reported 685 hours to make.

It will be shown this evening at Victoria’s Secret 20th anniversary show, alongside other models including Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid, as well as music from Selena Gomez, Ellie Goulding and The Weeknd.

The best thing we’ve spotted about it so far however? The infographic below from fashion site Stylight listing 20 alternative luxe and fun things you could buy for the price of the diamond-encrusted bra. Anyone up for 432,000 selfie sticks? Or how about eight return private jets from London to New York? Plus a serious amount of champagne for the ride – 13,100 bottles of Dom Perignon is the equivalent of filling 191 Olympic sized swimming pools. Or if you replace the Fantasy Bra with 26,000 regular Victoria’s Secret lingerie sets, that’s a new set everyday for 71 years.

Victoria-Secret-Fantasy-Bra-Infographic-Stylight-small2

Categories
Comment Editor's pick social media

Dolce & Gabbana’s #MFW selfies only enhance the fact we’re still blinded by gimmick

DolceGabbana_selfies

While big tech initiatives are easy to find during New York and London Fashion Weeks, once the month-long slog of back-to-back catwalk shows hits Milan and then Paris, little more follows.

Indeed the greatest news so far has been about the selfies on the Dolce & Gabbana catwalk. Short of anything else to write about, that got substantial press coverage, loads of social media sharing and even some tech blogs to boot.

This was about models walking the runway shooting photos of themselves via their phones in hand (as you can see pictured here). Those same images were then displayed on large screens around the Italian village-themed venue in real-time, as well as shared via Dolce & Gabbana’s own social media channels.

My social media feed, however, was then filled with people virtually rolling their eyes (if only there was an emoji for that). Not because it wasn’t cute – it was – but because it wasn’t new. Frankly, it’s a little mind blowing that it therefore got so much attention. Head on over to Forbes to read more of my comment piece detailing the issue with such gimmicks during fashion week season.

Categories
digital snippets e-commerce film social media technology

Digital snippets: Calvin Klein, Tommy Hilfiger, Net-a-Porter, ModCloth, Nasty Gal, Dove

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

calvinklein_bieber

  • Justin Bieber drives 3.6m+ new social followers for Calvin Klein [WWD]
  • Tommy Hilfiger becomes digital showroom pioneer [Pursuitist]
  • Net-a-Porter hints at launch of new social commerce experience [The Drum]
  • What changes at ModCloth and Nasty Gal mean for e-commerce [TechCrunch]
  • Dove’s latest film encourages girls to love their curls [AdWeek]
  • Footwear brand Merrell invites Sundance attendees to virtual reality hike [PSFK]
  • Op-ed: A picture is worth a million likes [BoF]
  • Why celebrity casting is spring’s biggest campaign trend [Fashionista]
  • Microsoft’s HoloLens presents a bold near-future for augmented reality [WGSN/blogs]
  • Are magic mirrors the next big thing? [Retailing Today]
  • Ringly has raised $5.1 million to make cocktail rings that light up when you get a notification [Business Insider]
Categories
Comment data digital snippets e-commerce Editor's pick film social media technology

2014: A designer meets digital year in review

Burberry_burberry_hr

What a year it has been for fashion and technology…

From wearables taking off with varying designer brands during fashion week, to the launch of new services like Apple Pay, the success of Alibaba’s IPO, discussion around visual search, the ongoing use of selfie campaigns and more, one thing after another has once again been making an impact in this space.

Below then, are 10 of the posts you loved the most on the relaunched F&M site this year. It’s an interesting exploration of subjects as varied as big data and viral videos, as well as the more gimmicky, yet PR-worthy role technology can often play. Think drones, Oculus Rift, the ALS #icebucketchallenge, and yet more on wearable tech.

Thank you for reading and see you in 2015!

Categories
digital snippets Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Dior, YSL, Ralph Lauren, Zara, Lyst

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Backstage Dior video shows one million flowers being installed at couture show (as above) [Fashionista]
  • Ralph Lauren organises Facebook send-off for Olympic athletes [Mashable]
  • Social commerce platform Lyst secures $5m funding [TheNextWeb]
  • KCD and Spring form partnership for global fashion communications, will help brands navigate complex new media landscape [WWD]
  • Designer uses Photoshop and textile software program to knit medical images into high fashion [The Atlantic]
Categories
social media Uncategorized

Social media proves the new press release for DKNY in faux #UK2012 video

You’re opening a new store in London. What do you do… A) send out a press release, B) announce it via social media, or C) make a video that explains the fact there’s no need for A anymore by demonstrating it happening via B in a faux scenario, and by proxy achieving it via B in real life in anycase.

Still with me?

Check out this new video from DKNY (starring “socialmedialites” including @psimadethis, @cocorocha, @bagsnob and more) that plays on each of the above themes to promote the opening of the brand’s new Bond Street store in London this weekend. Fake hashtag: #UK20112, but given the fact we’re now all talking about it that’d be a real hashtag too.

As put by DKNY PR Girl herself: “#Socialmedia really is the new press release!”

 

 

Categories
social media Uncategorized

Urban Outfitters and the power of Twitter tribes

I’ve been seeing tweets, news articles and comment about the necklace Urban Outfitters reportedly ripped off (as pictured above) from a Chicago-based designer called Stevie, for several days. What I hadn’t realised was that the story had originally gone viral off the back of one tweet.

Amber Karnes, a fellow crafty, wrote on Thursday: “I think it’s time to boycott Urban Outfitters. They have done this to so many independent artists. NOT OK http://bit.ly/kvbMdt

Despite the fact Karnes had little more than 1,000 followers at the time, that post travelled around the world within a matter of hours. The Huffington Post picked it up, so did Miley Cyrus. UO pulled the item from its website and its stores.

If anyone needed confirmation of the power of Twitter, it doesn’t get much better than this. The whole thing is comprehensively reported in Karnes’ post-tweet analysis.

What I love particularly, is her reference to tribes:

In his book Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us, Seth Godin explains that you only need 1,000 true fans to make a living. That the secret of success is no longer in mass appeal, but in niche. In the tight knit group of a network. Today’s Twitter craziness was all about that.

I am not a Twitter celebrity by any means. I barely had over 1,000 followers when the day began and I’m pretty sure about 200 of those are spam-bots. What I do have – and the reason that my call for a boycott on Urban Outfitters spread so fast and wide – is a tribe. A tight knit group of independent artists and crafters that follow me. My cause resounded with them. They spread it, and their friends spread it, and a few big influencers on Twitter spread it, and then it was gone.

When I worked as the webmaster (and often-shouted-down social media champion) at Fortune 500 railroad Norfolk Southern, I had a hard time explaining this concept. Their PR heads would say, “Why should a big corporation worry about cultivating a relationship with some railfan who only has 600 followers? Shouldn’t we go after the big ones? These little nobodies can’t do us any damage.” Well, today proved the opposite. Urban Outfitters is trending not because they have a great new line coming out, but because of a PR nightmare. Because one “nobody” put up a tweet about a crafter that had been wronged. And her tight little tribe of crafters responded.

Touché.