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Vivienne Westwood calls to ban land ownership, Shiseido acquires Drunk Elephant, Hong Kong protests hit luxury

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

Top Stories
  • The ‘only way to save the world’ is to ban land ownership, says Vivienne Westwood (Dezeen)
  • Why Shiseido bought Drunk Elephant for $845million (BoF)
  • Hong Kong protests could hit Burberry sales by up to £100million (Quartz)
Technology
  • Adidas 1st to sell shoes via Snapchat game (Mobile Marketer)
  • 5G smartphone sales will top 1B by 2025 (Mobile Marketer)
  • Unicef now accepting donations through bitcoin and ether (The Guardian)
  • 3D-printed smart textiles consume less energy, water & chemicals (Sourcing Journal)
  • GOAT showcases world’s rarest sneakers with AR try-ons (Mobile Marketer)
  • Personal stylists are using data to strengthen relationships (Vogue Business)
  • O2 launches ‘worlds first live ad’ powered by 5G (Campaign)
Sustainability & Purpose
  • California bans animal fur products (Drapers)
  • Kat von D launches vegan footwear line from apple ‘leather’ (Sourcing Journal)
  • Farfetch partners with Thrift+, a second hand donation platform (Retail Gazette)
  • Chloe forges three-year partnership with UNICEF (WWD)
  • Forget carbon neutral, Patagonia wants to be ‘carbon positive’ (Sourcing Journal)
  • Little Mistress launches sustainable packaging (Fashion United)
  • John Lewis launches sustainable ‘buyback’ trial (Retail Gazette)
Retail & Commerce
  • Stance opens Carnaby Street flagship store (Retail Gazette)
  • Morphe launches in-store Youtube studios to drive foot traffic (Glossy)
  • H&M outlet brand Afound shifts focus towards online (BoF)
  • Rental service HURR Collective to stage pop-up shop (The Industry)
  • Vans brings new boutique concept to Covent Garden (Fashion United)
  • Givenchy unveils US e-commerce site (WWD)
  • HMV launches Europe’s largest music store (Retail Week)
Business
  • Ganni’s guerrilla approach to global growth (BoF)
  • New CEO at Stella McCartney (Drapers)
  • Race to buy Barneys heats up (WWD)
  • Toys R Us relaunches website amid Target partnership (Charged Retail)
  • Victoria’s Secret store exec departs (Retail Dive)
  • LVMH luxury venture fund invests in streetwear brand Madhappy (Fashion Law)
Marketing & Social Media
  • Instagram launches Threads, a close friend chat app with auto-status (TechCrunch)
  • The next generation of menswear designers might be on Youtube (Fashionista)
  • Teens choose Youtube over Netflix for the first time (CNBC)
  • Abercrombie & Fitch, Hollister launch Instagram checkout (Retail Dive)
Product
  • Mens beauty grooming retailer Beast Inks deal for U.K rollout (WWD)
  • SprezzaBox and Esquire team up to launch subscription box (Fashion United)
  • Everlane launches ReCashmere sweater collection (Dezeen)
Culture
  • Adidas teams up with Universal Standard for a truly size-inclusive collaboration (Adweek)
  • Why 5,000-year-old fashion is making a comeback (BoF)
  • Lululemon partners with United Nations Foundation (Fashion United)
  • Kellogg’s autism-sensitive packaging for kids (Stylus)
  • Victoria’s Secret hires first plus-size model (Fashion United)
  • Havas and CALM team up to create self-care labelling for Topshop and Topman (Campaign)
  • The business of casting queer models (BoF)

How are you thinking about innovation? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more.

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business Campaigns Editor's pick Retail technology

7 ways fashion brands are harnessing hologram technology

We all remember the vision of Tupac being brought back to life by hologram technology during Coachella in 2012. 

Divided though opinion was, the interesting fact lay in the advance of the tech itself. Today, it is entirely possible for life-like constructs to be achieved in 3D so as to be visible to the naked eye. And more to the point, increasingly in a cost-effective way too. 

Today, it is estimated that the holography market will be worth $5.5 billion by 2020.

Fashion is one industry that has been experimenting in this space for some time, using holograms as both elaborate marketing techniques, as well as more immersive in-store opportunities aiming to drive brand engagement. 

Here are seven of the most interesting examples we’ve seen released over the years…

Alexander McQueen
Kate Moss hologram

In 2006, Kate Moss became the first human hologram to be featured as a part of a major fashion show. Alexander McQueen presented the 3D rendering of the supermodel as the finale of his ‘Windows of Culloden’ show in Paris. The hologram of Moss in a flowing white gown appeared out of nowhere to the audience from inside an empty glass pyramid following an elaborate puff of white smoke. The model danced for a few seconds before shrinking and dematerializing.

This iconic hologram, designed by video maker Baillie Walsh and directed by Lee McQueen himself, has become an iconic moment in fashion history and as such even saw revivals in 2011 and 2015 at the Savage Beauty Exhibits, dedicated to McQueen, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London respectively.

Diesel
Diesel SS08

In 2007, contemporary denim brand Diesel took the concept one step further from McQueen’s show the previous year by creating the biggest holographic fashion show to date for its Summer 2008 collection in Florence. The ‘Liquid Space’ show incorporated holograms that were created using the Pepper’s Ghost effect, an optical illusion that uses angled glass and hidden spaces, the technology for which was provided by tech specialist company Vizoo.

The campaign centred around marine creatures in space and used hologram technology to merge 2D projections of a high definition multi-screen video of the creatures with the real life models. The video images? were projected onto multiple transparent screens while careful lighting illuminated the catwalk with little or no scatter on the holographic screens. The virtual and real life elements on the catwalk consequently appeared as one to the audience.

Pinar&Viola
Pinar & Viola hologram

Dutch artists Pinar&Viola also used hologram technology to project an entirely virtual fashion line onto real life models in 2016 at their Amsterdam Fashion Week show. The occasion was designed to prompt emotions about clothing and encourage consumers to reconsider their rate of consumption in order to reduce wasted resources. The show was created in collaboration with AMFI student Amber Slooten and inspired by the mixed reality concepts of companies like Magic Leap and Microsoft’s HoloLens. Its aim was to explore how a future of holographic garments might work. 

The technology also allowed each piece of clothing to be animated through the allocation of characteristics such as eyes and mouths to further emphasize the conscious theme and help viewers to greater connect with the clothes despite them being inanimate.

Ralph Lauren
Holographic Ralph Lauren

The 2018 GQ Men of the Year Awards saw another first on the holographic medium front as pioneering designer Ralph Lauren beamed in via the medium to accept his ‘Design Lead of the Year’ award. The innovative concept was also created in celebration of the brand’s 50th anniversary. The realistic installation was created by Cinimod Holograms and used a staged box located away from the stage to create the theatre. The concept enabled the real life presenter at the awards to stand alongside and interact with Ralph’s hologram in a highly realistic and entertaining way for the audience.

This spectacle followed a series of other hologram integrations by the brand in previous years, including holographic window displays of sparring boxers in its Fifth Avenue flagship in New York in 2017 to promote the release of the new Polo Sport line, and the virtual spring 2015 Polo Womenswear show back in 2014  in Central Park.

Nicholas Kirkwood
CyFi walking at the Nicholas Kirkwood show

Footwear designer Nicholas Kirkwood is another that has utilized holograms by incorporating them in his inaugural London Fashion Week show in September 2018. Current Global worked with the brand to strategize the theme of the show, enhancing its cyber-reality theme by showcasing innovative visual technologies and integrating the experience of “white-hat” hackers in the presentation.

The result also saw a number of 3D hologram displays integrated throughout the show venue in order to enhance its underlying message of non-conformity. Created by tech company, Hologrm, they presented an animated 3D version of the collection’s main boot with neon detailing.

Wrangler
Wrangler’s immersive pop-up

US denim brand Wrangler also recently got on board with holograms, marking its Wrangler Icons launch with a 360-degree immersive pop-up experience that incorporated musicians and actors as well as numerous uses of the technology. The London experience paid homage to the brand’s musical heritage and iconic star-studded clientele from across the years. 

A continuous hologram feature was used to modernize the initiative, as well as helping to link the music theme back to the brand’s western image. A small black room at the back of the space appeared at first glance to house just drums and speakers however, broadcasted on top of the various instruments were holograms of dancing Wrangler cowboys wearing jeans and cowboy hats. The futuristic projections ran on a loop throughout the duration of the event.

Cartier
Cartier holographic watch

Of all of the fashion brands that have used holography over the years, luxury jeweller Cartier has perhaps one of the longest standing relationships with the technology. Back in 1972 the brand generated a lot of attention through its projection of a diamond bracelet dangling from an elegant wrist onto the Fifth Avenue pavement from its store window, which aimed to entice customers in. The piece, which was created by artist Robert Schinella, elicited so many enquiries that it was later revived again in 1979.

Cartier has also harnessed other forms of holograms as the technology has developed over the years, including a virtual craftsman working at a physical station at the Tokyo National Museum’s Cartier Exhibition in 2009, and a store windows campaign in 2015 where a hologram story mapped onto a physical watch face showing the inner workings and intricate parts involved in a watch.

How are you thinking about new technology? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Each of the rules referenced above is matched by one of our products and services. Interested in how? Get in touch to learn more.

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Nars launches immersive ‘playground’ pop-up in London

Nars Cosmetic celebrated the 20th birthday of its iconic “orgasm” products with an interactive pop-up experience in London this weekend meant to evoke female pleasure in a fun playground environment.

Dubbed ‘The O by Nars’, the pop-up featured five pink rooms, each of which tapped into a different sense – touch, smell, sound, taste and sight. The result connected to the idea of pleasure in a subtle and somewhat abstract manner.

The Taste Me Room, which contained candy floss and edible bubbles, and the Touch Me Room, which featured 120 latex spheres, were most directly linked to their relative sense, while other rooms were less so. The See Me Room, for instance, featured a merry-go-round, while the Smell Me Room hosted indoor swings and clouds. The Hear Me Room meanwhile contained a content orb.

Nars’ ‘See Me Room’ featured a merry-go round

The cosmetics brand also engaged technology to enable customers to capture and share their experiences via social media. When entering the experience, visitors were given an RFID (radio-frequency identification) key-card, which could be activated by touching a specific area. It then captured images and videos of participants, which were sent via email to users.

This is not the first time Nars has created an immersive pop-up experience. Previously, in September 2018, the make-up brand launched its House of Climax pop-up in New York, which supported the launch of a new mascara.

“We drew from our key learnings and successes surrounding the ‘House of Climax’,” Barbara Calcagni, president of Nars Cosmetics and Shiseido’s Makeup Center of Excellence told Glossy. “Among the most compelling learnings [was that] each guest was spending, on average, nearly 30 minutes within the experience, which was more than we had expected. Knowing our consumers’ appetites, we wanted to further expand and deepen the consumer journey.”

Like its previous pop-up experience, “The O by Nars” pop-up was ticketed, but free of charge. The focus was to immerse customers in the brand’s identity, rather than push product sales. On this occasion, the event also allowed customers to purchase a blush at the end.

How are you thinking about immersive experiences? Want to learn more about how we worked with Google? The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to hear more.

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WeWork and LIKEtoKNOW.it introduce influencer shopping to office spaces

Co-working company WeWork is partnering with influencer shopping platform LIKEtoKNOW.it to host a pop-up space at a London location where all decor is shoppable.

Located at Aviation House, WeWork’s newest office location in London, the space will be open for the month of January and is decorated with influencers and social media sharing in mind, featuring goods from brands such as Urban Outfitters, Amazon, Matalan and Debenhams. All products are then available to shop directly through the LIKEtoKNOW.it app.

“At WeWork, we’re focused on creating a working environment that fosters collaboration as well as productivity, and this LIKEtoKNOW.it pop-up will only increase the opportunities for our members to connect,” said Mathieu Proust, general manager of WeWork UK and Ireland.

The activation also has a customer acquisition angle as WeWork is offering people who are not members of its network the chance to sign up online and visit the pop-up space for a day, as well as use all other facilities in the office space.

WeWork has been working hard on expanding its retail capabilities over the past year. This is the second time it collaborates with the shopping platform on a retail experience, having hosted a similar space in a Miami location last year where all products were sourced from Walmart. Over the summer, it also launched WeMRKT, which sells products made by its members. Lastly in October 2018, it introduced designated Rent the Runway drop-off spots in six major US cities, including New York, Chicago and Miami, in order to facilitate returns to members of both services.

To support the continued expansion of its business ventures, WeWork rebranded as The We Company earlier this week.

How are you thinking about interactive retail experiences? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more

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Editor's pick Retail technology

Exploring Google’s experiential London pop-up: the Curiosity Rooms

Google's The Curiosity Rooms
Google’s Curiosity Rooms

Google has opened a month-long pop-up on London’s Regent Street, called the Curiosity Rooms, which offers a balance between connected moments and digital detoxing over a cup of tea.

The space is dedicated to encouraging visitor curiosity, a theme the tech company has embraced with the launch of its new Google Pixel 3 phone.

The result is a plethora of workshops, talks and experiences that have welcomed crowds of people since it opened last week, with most of the events planned sold out for the month.

The biggest lines when I visited focused around the “All-In Auto Wash” room – where groups can take selfies with the new Pixel phone, framed by pink carwash wipers – and the invite-only activation in the basement with pop band, Little Mix.

In between the mania, however, is a little haven of quiet in the form of The Pixedilly Café, a pink and blue 60s designed space. Here, guests are invited to experience one of the new features of the Pixel 3 phone, which invites a more mindful approach to digital communications.

The simple idea is that when you turn the phone over, all notifications, messages, calls and any other digital noise is turned off. Only when you are ready to get back to the real world, can you see all missed communications, simply by turning it back over.

To celebrate this sense of digital freedom, Google wants you to relax and enjoy in the most English-way possible – with a cup of tea. You don’t just get any old tea selection though, but instead the perfect one for you, based on a tasting menu that asks you four questions, all connected to how you would spend your perfect (digital) day-off.

The tongue-in-cheek asks include what type of weather you are, “warm and sunny” or “dark-and-stormy”, in order to concoct your custom brew. I ended up with the “Perfect Wind Down Cuppa”, a hot and spicy fruit tea mix.

Google's Curiosity Rooms
Google’s Curiosity Rooms

The pop-up space is otherwise spread over three floors in total with a multitude of further areas dedicated to different experiences.

There’s also the Google Maker’s Studio, which sees space rented by local London vendors, including flower-delivery company called Patch, and a small designer hosting workshops every week to teach children how to make clothes. There‘s also another space for creative talks, a coffee bar and a children’s play area with a giant “Not Pink” slide that allows those of all ages to travel down to the ground-floor again.

Meanwhile, the changing roster of events, with different talks, workshops and live podcast recordings, all tie in with the themes of health, mindfulness and millennial mind-sets.

A notable kick-off to the store space saw writer and activist Scarlett Curtis recording a live version of her Feminists Don’t Wear Pink podcast. Visitors have also been privy to a one-of-a-kind dining experience with food writer Grace Dent; a talk by entrepreneurial creative Sharmadean Reid, the co-founder of WAH nails and founder of beauty platform Beautystack, on how to use everyday technology to reach your goals; and further live podcast recordings with Dolly Alderton and Pandora Sykes and their weekly The High Low show.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about helping you build innovative integrations and experiences. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology, powered by a network of top startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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business Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media Startups sustainability technology

ICYMI: New York’s empty storefronts, the $2.6bn subscription wars, blockchain for counterfeit

subscription box wars

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • New York’s empty storefronts are a dark omen for the future of cities [The Atlantic]
  • Inside the $2.6 billion subscription box wars [FastCompany]
  • How blockchain will allow for fewer counterfeit goods and faster product recalls [Vox]
  • Facebook hires former deputy PM Nick Clegg [BBC]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Apple’s Jony Ive on the unpredictable consequences of innovation [WIRED]
  • Macy’s and Marxent partner up to add virtual reality experience to 70 Macy’s shops [FashionUnited]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Stella McCartney’s new Adidas collection champions eco-friendly materials [Dazed]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Universal Standard’s new SoHo store is the most size inclusive ever [Vogue]
  • The Body Shop to open enchanted forest pop-up in Shoreditch [Fashion Network]
  • Why no one really knows how many jobs automation will replace [Recode]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • The curious case of Coty’s #OldEra Burberry fragrance [BoF]
  • Adidas Originals introduces disappearing cinema campaign [WWD]
  • Tommy Hilfiger launches ‘Independence’ campaign [WWD]
  • Pinterest is turning more of its window shoppers into buyers with newest features [TechCrunch]
  • NTWRK: The TV-meets-e-comm fan concept putting a rocket under retailtainment [Forbes]
  • Kenzo turns Rousseau’s ‘Le Rêve’ into a 3D digital jungle [TheDrum]
PRODUCT
  • Burberry announces monthly product drops [FashionUnited]
  • Fame & Partners launches fully customizable clothing line [FashionUnited]
  • Palace breaks silence on Polo Ralph Lauren collaboration [BoF]
BUSINESS
  • Here’s a list of 57 bankruptcies in the retail apocalypse and why they failed [CBInsights]
  • WeWork is getting into workplace fashion with Rent the Runway [Bloomberg]
  • Ganni Names CEO to spearhead international expansion [WWD]
  • The end of cheap shipping from China [The Atlantic]
CULTURE
  • How streetwear collabs make uncool brands cool [Glossy]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Editor's pick Retail

From simulators to bouncy rooms: 3 NYC pop-ups innovating the customer experience

THE ARRIVALS pop-up

In an ever competitive landscape both online and offline, retailers are upping their game to attract customers to their stores by creating more immersive and interactive experiences.

The success of initiatives including the Museum of Ice Cream and Refinery29’s 29Rooms, has resulted in brands understanding the power of experiential campaigns for engaging digital and social natives.

New York has become a hub for many such activations, and we’ve seen endless examples over the summer and fashion week season: everything from a seven-room “experience” at Winky Lux, to an interactive market that Calvin Klein created in partnership with Amazon Fashion.

More experiential stores are popping up this fall. We toured three that recently opened in Soho to check out how they’re upgrading the customer experience in a bid to compete for foot traffic and ultimately drive sales.

Cartier Parfums Pop-Up

Cartier Parfums pop-up

From workshops to an art installation, the first-ever Cartier Parfums pop-up offers lots of activities to entice customers to step inside. This is part of the brand’s strategy to celebrate the launch of their new perfume: Carat, which is inspired by diamonds.

Upon walking in, shoppers are met with a colorful wall of mantras written on postcards, inscribed with phrases like “Reveal all the carats that shine through you” and “To live it all, you have to scent it all”. Visitors can send them to anywhere in the world for free. The store also has several of the brand’s iconic red jewelry boxes, which emit the scent of the perfumes when opened, offering an “olfactory journey”.

Flower workshops, hair styling, and even scented meditations are some of the experiences curated at the store – and they are free of charge. Taking place from Friday evenings to Sunday mornings, the activities need an RSVP.

The icing on the cake, however, is a multi-sensory light installation called Mille Facettes. Store-goers step into something that looks like the inside of a baguette-shaped diamond, in which a white light is diffused into a million facets of colors, plunging the visitor into the creative mind of the perfumer. The 90-seconds experience is also a beautiful background for an Instagram photo. In addition to that, visitors get a shareable image and a video over email.

Moncler’s House of Genius

Moncler’s House of Genius concept store

Moncler’s new concept store looks like a modern art museum. It’s part of the brand’s Genius project, in which eight designers were invited to redesign Moncler’s signature down jacket. Selling genius collections exclusively, the store has eight spaces that each designer transformed into their own. All the rooms are numbered and unique, prompting curious shoppers to walk through them to see the different interactive designs.

Valentino’s Pierpaolo Piccioli, one of the chosen designers, created a capsule collection for Moncler combining haute couture and skiwear. He took his inspiration from the renaissance period, so his space in the store displays mannequins similar to the ones seen in the Costume Institute exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Meanwhile, there is a space dedicated to the Grenoble collection, which is designed to be like the top of a ski slope, with angled mannequins that look ready to ski. There’s also Moncler’s “Yellow” collection, which is full of cult items like dog jackets – in the store they adorn statues of French bulldogs right at the entrance. Even though a typical Moncler jacket costs at least $1000, it’s easy to overlook this detail when a dog is welcoming you.

THE ARRIVALS Pop-Up

THE ARRIVALS pop-up

With the Holiday season in mind, NYC-based, digitally-native outerwear brand, THE ARRIVALS, has opened a pop-up in partnership with Dyson Supersonic. The concept is based on the intersection of where high-tech design and innovation meet functionality.

Earthy tone clothes are displayed against cushioned walls in soft millennial pink. Highly Instagramable, the space even has a wind-tunnel-meets-bounce-house, in which customers can jump while being blasted with the force of 36 high-powered DYSON fans. This is a great feature for a Boomerang-effect video.

The pop-up offers THE ARRIVALS collection Release 5.O and 5.1, in addition to limited edition items that are only available at the brick-and-mortar location. The pop-up also offers a selection of partner brands, including: Fates jewelry, BLYSZAK eyewear, Von Holzhausen handbags, and Sennheiser headphones.

After visiting all of the stores, one thing was certain: selfies aren’t going anywhere. Customers were willing to take their heels off to take pictures on the bouncy house, walked into Cartier asking for the sensorial room and Instagrammed everything in Moncler’s new store. Retailers that use unexpected physical experiences to generate buzz end up generating a ton of online traffic. As their customers would tell you: “Pics or it didn’t happen.”

How are you thinking about retail innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Campaigns Editor's pick Retail sustainability

Timberland debuts 13-foot installation in NY to accompany green pledge

Timberland
Timberland

 

Timberland is celebrating its 45-year anniversary with a pop-up park and 13-foot replica of its iconic Premium 6-Inch Wheat Boot in New York City.

Displayed in Flatiron District for one day only (Tuesday, October 16), the park and the boot installation represent the intersection of the brand’s New England roots and today’s modern city lifestyle.

The pop-up park has grass, benches, and living birch trees where visitors are encouraged to write and post their own eco-pledges. They are also invited to build their own potted succulent plant, a gift to green their personal space in the office or at home.

The park’s opening is otherwise the kick-off to a week-long series of events. On Wednesday, elements of the pop-up will then find a home at the Manhattan Center for Science and Mathematics in East Harlem. More than 150 volunteers from Timberland, Journeys and the Student Conservation Association are coming together to restore a rooftop greenhouse, install a living roof and construct an outdoor classroom and gathering space.

This is part of Timberland’s pledge to create or restore 500K square feet of green space in US cities over the next five years. To increase the visibility of those actions, Timberland partnered with YouTube phenom Mahogany Lox, this season’s brand ambassador.

Timberland
Timberland

“At Timberland, we are guided by a greater purpose — to step outside, work together and make it better. Urban greening is a powerful way to bring this notion to life,” said Jim Pisani, global brand president at Timberland. “Green spaces are the heartbeat of a community. They not only provide a place to play and explore, they also help enhance quality of life. Simply put, they make neighborhoods stronger. We are proud to make this commitment today, so these vibrant city spaces can be enjoyed for generations to come.”

The end of the celebration takes place at the brand’s newly launched pop-up store, located at 511 Fifth Avenue until January 2019. The concept space embraces nature and experiences with shopgoers surrounded by 2,000 native New England plant species and able to see Instagram-friendly spaces called “Rain Room,” and ”Snow Room”.

All day on Friday, October 19, the public will have access to entertainment, giveaways, and boots raffled off every hour beginning at 12:30pm in the store.

Further urban greening events are taking place in Chicago and Los Angeles during the week.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about helping you build innovative integrations and experiences. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology, powered by a network of top startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce film Retail Startups sustainability technology

ICYMI: Balenciaga’s futuristic show, Nike as the biggest fashion brand, robots to beat US tariffs

Balenciaga's SS19 Show
Balenciaga’s SS19 Show

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Back to the future: a futuristic theme was present at Balenciaga’s spring/summer 2019 show [Vogue]
  • “The vibe of the times”: How Nike became the biggest fashion brand in the world [GQ]
  • Hong Kong shirtmaker Esquel turns to robots to beat US tariffs [SCMP]
  • Can Paris grow its fashion-tech game? [BoF]
TECHNOLOGY
  • How biotechnology is reshaping fashion [BoF]
  • Walmart requires suppliers to use traceability system for leafy greens [Supermarket News]
  • You know nothing AI, that’s why you’re bad at conversation [The Next Web]
  • EasyJet tool lets people use photos to search for flights [Digiday]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Germanier unveils sustainable Christian Louboutin collaboration [WWD]
  • Patagonia uses recycled wool for ‘woolyester’ fleece [Apparel Insider]
  • ‘Sustainability means nothing’: How atelier Repairs’ Maurizio Donadi approaches responsible fashion [Glossy]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Finnish department store launches gender-neutral floor [FashionUnited]
  • Inside the J. Crew-Universal Standard collaboration [RetailDive]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Gap chatbot enlists ‘wear testers’ for men’s athleisure line [MobileMarketer]
  • MyTheresa and Miu Miu celebrate women’s empowerment with playful Rebel, Rebel film [FashionUnited]
BUSINESS
  • Michael Kors acquires Versace [Fashionista]
  • Converse is ready to rebound after a streak of struggles [FootwearNews]
  • Next beats UK heat as it raises full-year profit outlook [Bloomberg]
  • Chanel acquires Orlebar Brown [BoF]
  • Investors are pouring millions (and millions) of dollars into streetwear startups [Fashionista]
CULTURE
  • Kim Jones thinks it’s time to retire the term “streetwear”  [Highsnobiety]
  • Why companies like Bumble and 7-Eleven are trying to sell you skin care and makeup [Vox]
  • Instagrammable pop-ups are everywhere. What does that mean for art? [Vox]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
Editor's pick product Retail sustainability

Courregès ends iconic use of vinyl plastic with countdown pop-up

Courregès Fin du Plastique
Courregès Fin du Plastique

Courregès has opened a pop-up store in Paris that aims to make a statement about ending its use of plastics from here on out.

The Fin du Plastique initiative, as it’s called, marks the brand counting down its stock of shiny vinyl, a plastic it has been renowned for using for over 50 years.

Numbered products made from 6,000 meters of the stuff, are on sale until the material runs out. There’s a mix of current fall/winter 2018 pieces, as well as some archive looks revived by the brand’s new artistic director, Yolanda Zobel.

A colourful plastic bag print also features, with the words Fin or The Future is Behind You, on it.

“I have millions of meters of this amazing vinyl, and as it’s the iconic fabric of the house, I cannot dismiss it – it’s inspiring. I love the vinyl, its shine, but you can’t say hi to the new without bye to the old,” Zobel, said.

From here on, she will aim to source sustainable or recycled versions instead. “There’s no better world coming if we don’t take actions today.”

Courregès Fin du Plastique
Courregès Fin du Plastique

That comes as the industry at large starts to assess it use of plastics, as well as an aim for more circular materials across the board.

Brands like Stella McCartney has long been experimenting with such aims – exploring recycled plastics, more sustainable viscose, regenerated cashmere and more. Invites to her next show, which takes place on Monday in Paris, say: “Green is the new black.”

Yesterday Courregès sent a new collection down the Paris Fashion Week runway, which similarly made a statement about ending its use of plastics from here on out. “Fin du Plastique” and “The Future Is Behind You” were phrases extolled throughout as Zobel explored a post-plastics collection, using up more of the remains in the house and promising to invest profits from the brand back into developing an alternative material for the future.