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Campaigns technology

Tommy Hilfiger launches Instagram Stories templates ahead of fashion week show

Tommy Hilfiger is celebrating the launch of its collection with actress Zendaya, which is to be unveiled at Paris Fashion Week tomorrow, by encouraging social media followers to post branded Instagram Stories.

Ahead of the upcoming launch of the TommyXZendaya collaboration the label is partnering with app Unfold, which creates templates for Instagram Stories, on a series of 15 Tommy-branded templates that include prints and logos.

Upon using the Unfold app users can select the Tommy group of templates, and from then work on top of them by adding their own imagery and copy. Designs include variations of the Tommy Hilfiger logo, as well as colorful prints exclusive to the TommyXZendaya collection.

Templates will be available until March 12, while during the show tomorrow, Unfold will take over the brand’s Instagram Stories coverage.

Tommy Hilfiger’s fashion week presentations have become the brand’s platform of choice to test out new technologies that further invite its audience – whether watching the show in person or at home – into its universe. For example for its spring 2018 show in Milan, Formula 1-inspired TOMMYNOW DRIVE, attendees could scan QR codes to unlock more content on the collection and the manufacturing of a Mercedes racing car.

Last year the Current Global’s Innovators podcast spoke to Avery Baker, recently departed chief brand officer at Tommy Hilfiger, on the brand’s innovation strategy and how risk and authenticity play major roles in achieving it.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about helping you build innovative integrations and experiences. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology, powered by a network of top startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

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e-commerce Editor's pick Startups technology

20 years later, THAT virtual Clueless wardrobe is now a reality

Cherwears_plaid

There are few tech-enabled wardrobes more iconic that that of Cher Horowitz’s. Now 20 years since the launch of Clueless (it was first released in the US on July 19, 1995), we’re still seeing companies trying to replicate the personalised and customisable approach her computer had in helping her choose what to wear each day.

In celebration of the film’s anniversary, British virtual fit company Metail is back with its focus on fulfilling that need, nodding to the idea with the launch of a dedicated tribute site called www.Cherwears.com. The unofficial homage enables users to “try-on” and buy modern version of the looks worn by Cher and her three co-stars: Dionne, Tai and Amber.

Shoppers fill out three body measurements to be given a “MeModel” avatar that is reportedly 92% accurate to the user’s own body shape. From there, they can select which garments they want to see reflected on their likeness on screen, whether it be individual pieces or full outfits chosen for their resemblance to the film. There’s even a “Which 90’s girl are you?” quiz for users to discover their most suitable wardrobe to explore first.

Cherwears

Metail founder Tom Adeyoola said: “It’s a fun tribute both to a film we all love and to the woman who imagined this technology 20 years ago, and it perfectly illustrates the Metail technology as both useful and fun to engage with. We have made the online shopping experience as enjoyable as the best physical retail experience can be.”

Metail has worked with brand partners including House of Holland and Little Mistress as well as other high street labels to fill the site with relevant product to purchase. Each piece redirects to the relevant e-commerce site it’s sourced from for users to buy.

This post first appeared on Forbes.com

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mobile social media

Clarks to use Whatsapp to tell pop culture history of Desert Boot

clarks_desertboot

Clarks Originals is turning to popular messaging app Whatsapp to launch a multimedia storytelling campaign created by agency BBH.

The UK-based footwear brand will use the platform to tell the tale of its Desert Boot as it relates to popular culture. “From Rats to Rudeboys”, as the initiative is being called, will see images, playlists, videos and messages sent from three key personalities from subculture movements that featured the boot as an unofficial mascot during the 60s and 70s.

To access such accounts, users are first prompted to add a new contact number to their Whatsapp via teasers films placed across social media. That will introduce them to Nathan Clark, the original Desert Boot pioneer – a young man in the British Army in Burma who discovers a suede and crepe boot through his fellow officers in the bazaars of Cairo, and takes it back to his small family shoe business in England.

From there, fans are invited to discover the stories of Steve Barrow of The Mods, Bruno Barbey of The Enraged, and Stitch of The Rudeboys. Below is more detail from Clarks on each of them:

Steve Barrow, The Mods
If it’s possible for one man to define an entire subculture, Steve Barrow would be as close as it gets. In an era when modernist culture was flourishing in the UK, Steve would find himself at the heart of it. He was The Mod. He would go on to inspire the youth of his generation to embrace new music, and through his finely tailored tweed suits and the Clarks Desert Boots on his feet, to embrace fashion. Add him on WhatsApp (+44481 492599) to hear his story live from 1965 and be a part of the coolest generation Britain has ever seen.

Bruno Barbey, The Enraged
In May 1968 Bruno Barbey, Paris resident and Magnum photographer, was to find himself at the centre of a national uprising. Over the course of those few, tense days, he would go on to capture a series of photographs that would define a nation’s restlessness and encapsulate the spirit of rebellious youth. Add him on WhatsApp (+44481 491810) to hear his story live from 1968, from the debates with the heads of the Sorbonne, to the Clarks Desert Boots the students wore on their feet.

Stitch, The Rudeboys
Meet Stitch, reggae icon and head of a group of rudeboys called the Spanglers who were at the heart of reggae’s birth in 70s Kingston. At a time when status was king, every rudeboy in town had to own a pair of Clarks. But how do you buy British shoes when your government have banned imports? Add him on WhatsApp (+44841 495645) to hear his story live and direct from 1976. The man who left for England with a suitcase full of records, and returned with a suitcase full of Clarks.