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business digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: embracing AR, Artefact accepts crypto payments, why AI for retail is all wrong

Ikea AR augmented reality
Ikea

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past fortnight.

TOP STORIES
  • Brands are finally embracing augmented reality, but not without speed bumps [AdWeek]
  • Artefact London becomes world’s first tailor to accept crypto payments [TheIndustry]
  • Why retail’s artificial intelligence bet is all wrong [QZ]
  • Who is most vulnerable to Amazon’s inexorable rise? [BoF]
  • Hubert de Givenchy dies at 91; Fashion pillar of romantic elegance [NY Times]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Macy’s advancing mobile checkout in innovation agenda [WWD]
  • Bose’s augmented reality glasses use sound instead of sight [TheVerge]
  • Nordstrom is investing in technology to support personalization and customer service [Glossy]
  • ‘People are never going to want to buy something via voice’: Alexa hasn’t caught on for fashion brands [Glossy]
  • Buying stuff with Bitcoin could get way easier courtesy of PayPal [TrustedReviews]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • H&M on why collective industry ambition is crucial for a sustainable fashion future [Forbes]
  • Sustainability is not about designing less, but designing better [Wallpaper]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • John Lewis CIO: forget incremental updates, retailers need a total tech reset to survive [Campaign]
  • Harvey Nichols joins Farfetch in a first for both companies [WWD]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Instagram could soon be launching voice and video calling [DigitalTrends]
  • The world’s first digital supermodel has arrived, here’s what you need to know [HighSnobiety]
PRODUCT
  • This designer bag is made from Burberry’s leftover leather scraps [Wired]
  • The soles of these shoes are made from recycled gum [Fast Company]
  • Allbirds wants your next sneaker to come from eucalyptus trees [BoF]
BUSINESS
  • Prada sees growth ahead despite profit drop [Reuters]
  • The running list of 2018 retail bankruptcies [RetailDive]
  • Is Dior ready for a revolution? [BoF]
  • Tommy Hilfiger’s bet on instant gratification is paying off [Bloomberg]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media technology

ICYMI: Starbucks’ blockchain rewards scheme, luxury in the age of digital Darwinism

Starbucks’ Rewards scheme
Starbucks’ Rewards scheme

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Starbucks’ Rewards scheme is part of its much bigger vision for a blockchain-backed digital currency [TheDrum]
  • Luxury in the age of digital Darwinism [McKinsey]
  • Meet fashion’s first computer-generated influencer [BoF]
  • Instagram appeal: How social media is changing product development in beauty [Digiday]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Retail spending on AI to reach $7.3B by 2022 [Retail Dive]
  • MIT scientists created accessories that change color to match your outfit [QZ]
  • The Grammys brought IBM Watson’s artificial intelligence to the red carpet [AdWeek]
  • Walmart’s new robots are loved by staff—and ignored by customers [TechnologyReview]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Bonobos CEO Andy Dunn explains the Walmart acquisition: ‘We have a safe and permanent home’ [Glossy]
  • Personalization is a priority for retailers, but can online vendors deliver? [AdWeek]
  • H&M moves into the off-price marketplace with Afound [FashionUnited]
  • Selfridges launches world’s first in-store boxing gym [FashionNetwork]
  • Mashable and eBay team up for launch of shoppable images pilot [TheDrum]
PRODUCT
  • Adidas Boost: the sneaker technology that changed a company’s fortunes [GQ]
  • GlassesUSA.com to launch 3D printable glasses [FashionUnited]
  • Amazon just patented some creepy “Black Mirror”-esque tracking wristbands [FastCompany]
BUSINESS
  • After 15 years, eBay plans to cut off PayPal as its main payments processor [Recode]
  • Ralph Lauren is discovering how hard it is to fix a brand [Fortune]
  • H&M admits ‘mistakes’ in handling shift to online shopping [FT]
  • JD.com puts France at the heart of its internationalization strategy [FashionNetwork]
Categories
business data digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: Browns’ new tech store, Gucci’s millennial advisors, Amazon’s fashion gap

The new Browns concept store in east London
The new Browns concept store in east London

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past fortnight.


TOP STORIES
  • Browns opens a nomadic concept (tech) store in London’s Shoreditch [Wallpaper]
  • Gucci has a “shadow committee” of millennial advisors [QZ]
  • Amazon ‘still has a long way to go’ in conquering fashion market, says report [BoF]
  • Alibaba’s 11.11 shopping festival is ready for its biggest global event [BrandChannel]
  • Opinion: What’s wrong with fashion’s sustainability strategy [Glossy]
  • ‘Terry Richardson is just the tip of the iceberg’ [NY Times]

BUSINESS
  • Hilfiger says making clothes in America remains unrealistic [Bloomberg]
  • H&M denies burning good, unsold product [Racked]
  • Greenpeace on why fashion is at a crossroads [FashionUnited]
  • Vogue and Vice are starting a new website together [Jezebel]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • You can now PayPal friends in Messenger and get help via chat [TechCrunch]
  • WeChat is becoming a sales tool for luxury brand sales associates [Jing Daily]
  • Snap’s misfire on Spectacles [The Information]

MARKETING
  • Sephora cast its own store employees for its most diverse campaign yet [Racked]
  • Selena Gomez is party-ready in Coach’s glitzy holiday ad campaign [Fashionista]
  • Net-a-Porter and Mr Porter unveil “Party with the Porters” holiday campaign [TheIndustry]
  • The land of Fenty: The Rihanna masterclass in brand-building [BrandChannel]
  • Why visceral storytelling is the next brand-building territory [LeanLuxe]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Take a look at Apple’s first ‘Town Square,’ its most beautiful retail store yet [TechCrunch]
  • Now Amazon wants to leave a package inside your house [Marketplace]
  • The most successful e-commerce brands build for mainstream America, not Silicon Valley [Recode]
  • Hudson’s Bay to sell Lord & Taylor Fifth Avenue store to WeWork [RetailDive]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Target.com rolls out augmented reality experience for smartphones [StarTribune]
  • The Under Armour ArmourBox: Subscription gear handpicked by an AI [BrandChannel]
  • Walmart’s Store No. 8 showcases the future of VR [RetailDive]
  • Nike’s focus on robotics threatens Asia’s low-cost workforce [CNBC]
  • Wal-Mart’s new robots scan shelves to restock items faster [Reuters]

START-UPS
  • How Stitch Fix’s data-driven styling could boost its IPO value [Bloomberg]
  • Harvey Nichols partners with Bink on “Payment Linked Loyalty” [TheIndustry]
Categories
e-commerce

Literal window shopping with Kate Spade Saturday’s digital, touchscreen storefronts

KateSpadeSaturday1

Kate Spade Saturday has taken up residence in New York with four pop-up digital stores appearing as window fronts around the city.

The “weekend brand” from Kate Spade, which opened its first store in Tokyo in March, offers 30 products from its range through an interactive touchscreen experience that’s available 24-hours a day. New items launch every Saturday following.

“This gives us the ability to produce more from our retail space,” Kate Spade CEO, William McComb, told Reuters. “My nickname for it is the Wall as a Mall.”

Standing in front of the window, shoppers can click to explore looks, opt to buy them via PayPal, and best of all have them delivered with an hour to wherever they are in the city thanks to a partnership with eBay. Security also isn’t a concern – despite being a giant screen, the initiative doesn’t ask for credit card information or your address for every other passerby to see, instead texting you with a link that leads you to your window shop bag on your own phone instead.

Here are some images I took from the West 18th Street store. The other locations are 175 Orchard Street, 154 Spring Street, and 30 Gansevoort Street. All are open until July 7. Window shopping just hit a new reality…

KateSpadeSaturday6 KateSpadeSaturday2KateSpadeSaturday3KateSpadeSaturday KateSpadeSaturday5KateSpadeSaturday7 KateSpadeSaturday4

Categories
mobile Uncategorized

Why retailers should know Jack Dorsey

I’ve just read the profile of Jack Dorsey, the man credited with creating Twitter, in this month’s issue of Vanity Fair.

It’s inspiring. At 34, Dorsey’s life has been insanely productive – everything from program writing to botanical illustration student, alongside a brief flirtation with fashion design in between.

Now, still chairman of Twitter and second majority shareholder, he’s also the CEO (and co-founder) of Square, a service that allows anyone to easily accept credit card payments via their smartphone by attaching a small square-shaped device. As author David Kirkpatrick writes: “Square can make anyone a merchant.”

For retail at every level, this is undeniably something to watch. The surge of m-commerce and the role of mobile payments are in heavy discussion at present; no one has nailed it on the head just yet, which is exactly why it makes for such good debate.

Dorsey’s plans for Square are big. Where Twitter became the new communications tool, this, he says, is the future payments network.

Sean Parker, of Facebook fame, comments: ““Maybe Square can become for Craigslist what PayPal is for eBay.” A big shout, but if Dorsey’s past experience is anything to go by, no doubt an achieveable one.

Dorsey’s ambition is to make life easier for people, the article explains; something he’s seemingly facilitating one invention at a time.

Add to that his devotion to design – the result of a childhood obsession with maps – and commitment to echoing this throughout his company, and I for one am sold.

I urge you to read it: Twitter Was Act One