Categories
business digital snippets product Retail social media sustainability technology

Amazon 10 years ahead of UN Paris agreement, Nike’s first hijab ambassador, Facebook’s AI styling

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

Top Stories
  • Amazon plans to meet UN Paris agreement 10 years early (CNBC)
  • First Nike hijab ambassador on breaking barriers for women in fitness (Evening Standard)
  • Facebook experiments with AI-powered styling program (Vogue Business)
Technology
  • Google and Jennifer Lopez reinvent the Versace dress that created Google Images (The Verge)
  • L’Oreal’s Color&Co adds AR hair color try-ons (Mobile Marketer)
  • The quiet robot revolution that can unlock a trillion dollars in retail efficiencies (Forbes)
  • Starbuck taps Alibaba’s Tmall Genie for voice ordering (The Drum)
  • Facebook teams up with Ray-Ban on smart glasses (Mobile Marketer)
  • Google opens a new AI research centre in India (The Next Web)
Sustainability & Purpose
  • Moncler tops Dow Jones Sustainability Index (Drapers)
  • Waste2Wear presents world’s first collection of ocean plastics verified with Blockchain (Fashion United)
  • Ikea invests in solar farms (Fast Company)
  • Nike opens distribution center fully powered by renewable energy (Highsnobiety)
  • Toast launches clothes-swap scheme (Drapers)
  • Salesforce is building an app to gauge a company’s sustainability progress (Tech Crunch)
  • Green money: AmEx joins fight against plastic waste (Stylus)
  • Avery Dennison teams up with plastic bank to further the circular economy (Sourcing Journal)
Retail & E-commerce
  • Body Shop opens refillable concept store (The Guardian)
  • Sandro opens first US flagship store in New York (Fashion United)
  • Psyche launches standalone childrenswear site (Drapers)
  • Quinn Harper opens first store on the King’s Road (TheIndustry)
  • Pandora unveils new store concept in Birmingham (Fashion United)
Business
  • Ocado and M&S’ new joint venture enjoys double digit growth (Charged Retail)
  • H&M to test selling external brands in strategy shift (BoF)
  • Thomas Cook collapse leaves thousands stranded as bailout fails (Bloomberg)
  • Burberry appoints non-executive director (Drapers)
  • In London, fashion takes a break from Brexit (BoF)
  • Toby Bateman steps down from Mr Porter (Retail Gazette)
  • Bluemercury founders depart Macy’s (Retail Dive)
Marketing & Social Media
  • The danger for luxury brands that fail at story telling (Jing Daily)
  • Urban Decay dishes out makeup samples to Bumble app users (Mobile Marketer)
  • As Gucci trips up on social media, sales fall (WSJ)
  • Louis Vuitton launces LVTV (Fashion United)
Product
  • Caspar jumps on the CBD bandwagon with sleep gummies (Retail Dive)
  • HP debut first computer made with ocean-bound plastics (Adweek)
  • Victoria Beckham launches beauty line at LFW (Fashion United)
  • Italy’s Opera Campi to launch stretch hemp apparel (Sourcing Journal)
Culture
  • Instagram adds new restrictions on weight-loss products and cosmetic procedures (Adweek)
  • Banana Republic looks to skin tone and size inclusivity for turnaround (BoF)
  • Refinery29 and Eloquii team up to create a crowdsourced plus-size collection (Adweek)
  • Gucci faces backlash for straightjackets at Milan show (BoF)

How are you thinking about innovation? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
Events mobile Retail social media technology

Balmain launches app to connect customers to brand universe


Luxury label Balmain has released an app that aims to give consumers more access to the brand’s universe, in a mission championed by creative director Olivier Rousteing.

The app, which was released on iTunes yesterday, will allow users to engage with the brand in a multitude of different ways.

“The app is the final element of the strategy we are rolling out to launch the new monogram, the new logo, and to support overall the new communication strategy of Balmain,” the label’s CEO Massimo Piombini told WWD. “This is a way to connect with the next generation, with new customers, with a segment of customers that are close to the brand that are expecting from us these kinds of new features.”

For example ahead of the label’s upcoming couture show which takes place on January 23, users will be able to scan posters through the streets of Paris to trigger augmented reality content. Users will also be able to watch a livestream of the show, the house’s first couture collection in 16 years, as well as footage of the menswear show that is happening tomorrow.

To give brand fans a further glimpse into the brand, there will also interactive content around its new Saint Honoré flagship, which is due to open in February. The brand has announced that it will also be launching similar initiatives at key European cities in the future.

Under Rousteing’s helm, the 82-year-old label has been increasingly connecting with younger consumers through the lens of digital. In April 2018, it created a virtual reality experience at its Milan store based on the designer’s inspirations for the brand’s collections, while its latest campaign featured a cast of virtual models.

How are you thinking about digital innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so.TheCurrent Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
data product Retail technology

Chanel’s new Paris flagship will test augmented retail concept

Chanel
Chanel

Chanel’s newly-opened flagship in Paris will serve as a testing ground for the label’s digital initiatives, aiming to create an increasingly omnichannel retail experience. 

This is part of an innovation partnership with Farfetch announced earlier this year, which will see the luxury brand develop new clienteling tools both online and in-store. Called Augmented Retail, the vision will use data and other digital capabilities to create a personalized shopping experience, according to Farfetch founder and CEO José Neves.

Speaking on the partnership in February, he said: “It is truly an honour to be partnering with Chanel to accelerate the development of technology-driven initiatives which will ensure they remain at the forefront of retail excellence and elevate the already unparalleled level of luxury experience for its clients that Chanel is renowned for.”

Among the digital features set to be rolled out over the next six months is the launch of a dedicated Chanel app, which will focus on giving its most loyal shoppers more access to the brand, as well as a more tailored shopping experience.

Beyond tech enhancements, the five-storey space has a heavy focus on its VIP customers, with the two top floors dedicated to exclusive experiences, such as enjoying private meals and even taking a shower. 

Luxury brands and retailers are increasingly dedicating shopfloor space to providing its most engaged customers with experiences that go beyond shopping. Earlier this year, online retailer Matchesfashion.com opened its first physical space at a townhouse in London, featuring floors with the sole purpose of hosting events such as book signings, podcast recordings, exhibitions and exercise classes.

How are you thinking about retail innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce film Retail Startups sustainability technology

ICYMI: Balenciaga’s futuristic show, Nike as the biggest fashion brand, robots to beat US tariffs

Balenciaga's SS19 Show
Balenciaga’s SS19 Show

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Back to the future: a futuristic theme was present at Balenciaga’s spring/summer 2019 show [Vogue]
  • “The vibe of the times”: How Nike became the biggest fashion brand in the world [GQ]
  • Hong Kong shirtmaker Esquel turns to robots to beat US tariffs [SCMP]
  • Can Paris grow its fashion-tech game? [BoF]
TECHNOLOGY
  • How biotechnology is reshaping fashion [BoF]
  • Walmart requires suppliers to use traceability system for leafy greens [Supermarket News]
  • You know nothing AI, that’s why you’re bad at conversation [The Next Web]
  • EasyJet tool lets people use photos to search for flights [Digiday]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Germanier unveils sustainable Christian Louboutin collaboration [WWD]
  • Patagonia uses recycled wool for ‘woolyester’ fleece [Apparel Insider]
  • ‘Sustainability means nothing’: How atelier Repairs’ Maurizio Donadi approaches responsible fashion [Glossy]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Finnish department store launches gender-neutral floor [FashionUnited]
  • Inside the J. Crew-Universal Standard collaboration [RetailDive]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Gap chatbot enlists ‘wear testers’ for men’s athleisure line [MobileMarketer]
  • MyTheresa and Miu Miu celebrate women’s empowerment with playful Rebel, Rebel film [FashionUnited]
BUSINESS
  • Michael Kors acquires Versace [Fashionista]
  • Converse is ready to rebound after a streak of struggles [FootwearNews]
  • Next beats UK heat as it raises full-year profit outlook [Bloomberg]
  • Chanel acquires Orlebar Brown [BoF]
  • Investors are pouring millions (and millions) of dollars into streetwear startups [Fashionista]
CULTURE
  • Kim Jones thinks it’s time to retire the term “streetwear”  [Highsnobiety]
  • Why companies like Bumble and 7-Eleven are trying to sell you skin care and makeup [Vox]
  • Instagrammable pop-ups are everywhere. What does that mean for art? [Vox]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
Campaigns Editor's pick product technology

Uniqlo unveils live horizontal knitting machine at Paris exhibition

Uniqlo
Uniqlo

Uniqlo has unveiled an exhibition in Paris today, featuring a giant horizontal knitting machine, which will knit Uniqlo sweaters in front of a live audience.

Called “The Art and Science of LifeWear”, the show aims to tell the story of the textile technology behind the brand.

Held at the Jeu de Paume museum, visitors will also be able to follow the production journey of a typical Uniqlo knitwear product through a series of photographs. The show has fittingly opened just one day after the beginning of Paris Fashion Week.

At the exhibition’s opening, the brand’s founder and president, Tadashi Yanai, talked to the founding principles of the company. “Simple yet functional, high-quality and durable clothes, that’s what we aspire to offer,” he told WWD.

Uniqlo's Horizontal Knitwear Machine
Uniqlo’s Horizontal Knitwear Machine

The machine itself is a unique piece of storytelling of Uniqlo’s history. Established in 1962 by the company Shima Seiki, which works with Uniqlo for all its knitwear production, it innovated knitwear production by creating a machine that worked in a similar fashion to a 3D printer.

A company representative says the machine reduces production waste: “The horizontal knitting machine starts with one string of yarn to create the product. It does not require any different patterns, therefore there is no waste at all.”

This ties in with Uniqlo’s sustainability pledge, to which Yanai added: “Sustainability is everything. This is the most important value for mankind and that’s what we like to keep implementing through our clothing business and we are very, very serious about changing clothes, changing conventional wisdom and changing the world.”

At the end of the exhibition, visitors are able to purchase travel-themed sweaters via the museum shop. A questionnaire poses them the question: “Did this exhibition make you want to buy Uniqlo knitwear?”

The exhibition runs until Saturday, September 29.

How are you thinking about textile innovation and sustainability? We’re all about helping you build strategic integrations. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology, powered by a network of top startups. Get in touch to learn more.

 

Categories
business data digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Inside Target’s test store, algorithms threatening jobs, L’Occitane’s AI personalization

Target
Target

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Inside Target’s top secret test store [Co.Design]
  • How algorithms are threatening fashion’s white-collar jobs [BoF]
  • L’Occitane boosts mobile conversions by 159% with AI-powered personalization [Mobile Marketing]
TECHNOLOGY
  • What blockchain can’t do [HBR]
  • Think you know how disruptive artificial intelligence is? Think again [Forbes]
  • Top Japan fashion site bets big on custom-fit fast fashion [BoF]
  • Baidu’s self-driving buses will hit Japan’s streets next year [TNW]
  • How SK-II disrupted the beauty industry in Japan with emerging technology [TheDrum]
  • Watch MIT’s blind robot run, jump, and climb stairs [TNW]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • Factory Tour: Eileen Fisher helps make the eco-fashion dream of circularity come true [Fashionista]
  • Wrangler and MyFarms talk ‘field-level’ sustainability in new report [WWD]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • 27% of apparel sales are now online [RetailDive]
  • Why virtual reality won’t revolutionize retail, but scan-and-go will [RetailDive]
  • Sophia Webster puts her spin on experiential retail with second London boutique [WWD]
  • Reporter’s notebook: A quest for experiential retail [RetailDive]
  • Walmart.com launches 3-D virtual reality tour [WWD]
  • Amazon claims it doesn’t want to take on UPS and FedEx. So why is it introducing tons of its own Amazon delivery vans? [Recode]
  • Samsung brand experience opens its doors in the heart of Paris [BrandChannel]
  • Kirsten Green’s survival guide for the ‘retail reckoning’ [BoF]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Inside Instagram’s social shopping masterclass [BoF]
  • Hilfiger’s next TommyNow runway show to touch down in Shanghai [WWD]
  • Are influencers really worth the money? [BoF]
  • Roger Federer signs $300 million sponsorship deal with Uniqlo [BoF]
PRODUCT
  • These people with disabilities have ideas for making shopping more accessible [TeenVogue]
  • Tiffany & Co. will now let you personalize with custom symbols and monograms [Town & Country]
  • What FDA approval of CBD could mean for the beauty industry [Racked]
  • Walmart pulls “Impeach 45” t-shirts after Trump supporters threaten boycott [FastCompany]
BUSINESS
  • Paris Fashion Week’s front rows speak to fashion’s complicated stance on #MeToo [TheFashionLaw]
  • Chanel’s digital strategy takes shape amid executive shuffle [BoF]
  • Subscription box market fights fatigue [AdAge]
  • How Revolve has built a billion-dollar fashion company for millennial women [Inc]
  • Fans of ModCloth and Bonobos were aghast when Walmart bought the brands. But they’re still shopping [Quartzy]
Categories
mobile technology

Kate Spade turns to augmented reality for experiential Paris launch

Kate Spade New York's augmented reality experience in Paris
Kate Spade New York’s augmented reality experience in Paris

Kate Spade New York is marking the opening of its new Paris flagship with an augmented reality experience designed to bring the city to life.

Joy Walks, as the initiative is called, turns the fashion capital into an interactive playground, enabling users to see “unexpected moments of joy”, such as pink flamingoes frolicking in the Seine and a New York City yellow cab bustling down a Parisian street. When users arrive at the new boutique on Rue Saint-Honoré, they will also be rewarded with a specially made set of branded pins.

A total of 10 key sites in the city are highlighted, each of them delivered from the vantage point of one of three influencers: Adenorah, Natacha Birds and The Balloon Diary (Anna Dawson).

The campaign was built in partnership with brandtech group, You & Mr Jones, who brought AR firm Zappar and influencer marketing company theAmplify on board. It can be accessed via an app called Tapage, from My Little Paris.

“Our brand promise is grounded in inspiring our customer to lead a more interesting life. We are always looking for innovative ways – including new technology – to deliver on our customer-centric brand promise. We are focused on storytelling across a variety of platforms, ensuring that we create thoughtful, unique programming tailored for each specific opportunity. Our latest innovative experience allows Parisians to experience life through the Kate Spade New York lens and brings our particular brand of joyfulness to their city,” said Mary Beech, executive vice president and chief marketing officer at the brand.

Consumers are also encouraged to snap and share their Joy Walk experiences using the hashtag #katespadejoy.

The activity was made using Zappar’s content authoring and publishing platform, ZapWorks, which offers the ability to make interactive, engaging and expressive snackable content for on-the-go occasions. It uses GPS and maps to help the user find their individual location, and also takes advantage of the device’s gyro, accelerometer and compass to display the experiences through the phone’s camera overlaid on the real world with augmented reality.

The interactive map for Kate Spade New York's augmented reality experience in Paris
The interactive map for Kate Spade New York’s augmented reality experience in Paris

Categories
product Startups technology

Colette hosts fashion and technology exhibition in Paris windows

The Dream Band by Erik Halley and Luciding for Fashion Hack at Collete
The Dream Band by Erik Halley and Luciding for Fashion Hack at Collete

One of the biggest barriers for wearable technology’s uptake in the fashion industry has quite simply been around aesthetics. Something that puts functionality first, doesn’t fit so well in an industry geared to form.

And yet this technology is slowly morphing into something that is about so much more than biometrics, for instance, and rather entire experiences. In doing so, it’s opening enormous doors for the fashion industry, indeed the luxury world, to step in and think about where craft sits alongside.

That’s the premise behind a new exhibition called “Fashion Hack”, which opens in the windows of concept store Colette in Paris today for a week. 10 prototypes have been created by fashion designers; within them embedding various new technologies relevant to this sector.

Curated by Carole Sabas, a correspondent for French Vogue and the author behind The Fashion Guides series, the technologies were scouted from the west coast of the US, where Sabas is now based.

“In opposition to the ‘wearables’ category, these fashion accessories are first and foremost luxury goods, crafted as couture objects,” she explains. “Their invisible perks are limited to a few features: a surprising comfort (re-engineered soles) or stunning experience (self-heating sheer fabric, enhanced listening…) No biometrics will be measured, no apps will be downloaded. Seamlessly merged with fashion, the tech factor is an inconspicuous bonus. A secret layer of convenience, second to fashion.”

Included is a self-heating jacket from Thermaltech and ACRNM, enabled via solar panels coated on metallic threads; a 100% natural cotton shirt embedded with nano-encapsulated technology to ensure water, oil and wine stains are repelled, from Maud Jeline and Dropel; a headband designed to induce lucid dreams during sleep, created by Erik Halley and Luciding; and a pair of embellished earrings from Michael Schmidt Studios and Bragi, which essentially sees jewellery clipped on to a pair of smart audio earphones. Tech-enabled shoes, bags, belts and glasses all feature.

There are also nine mini robot balls that have been programmed by a choreographer to execute a baroque-inspired ballet in the window.

For Sabas it was really key to look at how to integrate technology, but not have it as the central feature – arguably the direction this space is set to move in. “After all, zippers and buttons are also tech,” she explains. “We’ll pretty soon stop aweing at connected jackets, as we long stop aweing at our iPhones. But we’ll still awe at cool, fashionable jackets.”

Sabas spends her time between fashion weeks and tech shows like CES in Las Vegas and is often left bewildered at some of the suggestions put out there, she explains. “I couldn’t believe that I was seeing the same umbrellas that buzz you if it’s going to rain, rings that blink when you receive texts and belt that text you if you’re on the verge of eating too much.”

But she also came to understand how the tech circle works in terms of secrecy, NDAs, patents and more, and wanted to prove how much more could be possible through collaboration.

“The idea is to suggest to tech start-ups to collaborate with fashion designers if their intention is to target luxury stores alongside electronic retailing. It also invites fashion houses to reach out to tech people, in order to get ready for things like the wireless charging bags, smart eyeglasses, high heels 2:0, connected jackets and jewellery and other ‘hearables’ coming their way in a couple of seasons,” she explains.

She’s a technophile at heart, but one with a vision that makes sense for both consumers and brands alike: “I would like what the rest of the world would like – IoT that grows meaningful, useful, invisible, weightless, universal, with no cables and long life batteries. Something that makes you feel chic, creative and efficient.”

More importantly, she believes the fashion industry needs to wake up to the revolution happening before the tech companies themselves become more powerful as brands within the same sphere.

Categories
e-commerce

Birchbox turns to Paris for second physical store location

Birchbox's New York store
Birchbox’s New York store

Beauty subscription service, Birchbox, is set to unveil its second permanent physical location, this time in Paris.

Hot on the heels of several successful pop-ups in the French capital, including within Le Bon Marche and Galeries Lafayette, it will open at 17 rue Montmartre this spring.

It follows the first Birchbox store opening in New York in July 2014, which is referred to by the team as “a powerful way to connect with our customers”. Shoppers to that store go on to have a three-times higher lifetime value with the brand, the press release explains.

“With 90% of beauty still purchased offline, we wanted our French team to have the same opportunity to interact with their customers in the physical world,” it adds.

The Paris store will mirror that of the New York one, which is an extension of the online experience. The aim is to deepen relationships with French subscribers, introduce Birchbox to new customers, and build partnerships with new beauty brands.

France is its biggest market in Europe, ahead of the UK, Spain, Belgium and Ireland, where it also operates.

The news comes despite two rounds of staff layoffs at Birchbox during 2016, which it said were the result of it needing to get to profitability quicker than planned because of a shift in how investors are valuing growing, but money-losing, startups, Recode reported last summer. It since raised a $15 million “lifeline” from current investors.

According to Birchbox, it saw a particularly strong holiday season, with US sales more than 10% ahead of its acquisition results year-on-year for the month of December. It also says it plans to open more stores in the US in the foreseeable future.

Categories
business Comment data e-commerce Editor's pick

“Data Center Chanel” observes the most important aspect of luxury’s future at #PFW

Data Chanel PFW
Data Center Chanel at Paris Fashion Week (Image via Chanel)

Chanel has long been known for bringing elaborate set designs to Paris Fashion Week. Tapping into a sense of Instagram-ready curation, Karl Lagerfeld has introduced everything from a supermarket to an airport terminal and casino in recent seasons. In other words, backdrops that the audience will love to capture for the sake of social media, almost irrespective of the collection itself.

Today was no different, except this time there was an extra layer to the proceedings, arguably a metaphorical one about the future of luxury.

“Data Center Chanel” was the theme, with a series of data storage units (a supercomputer if you will) acting as the set for the spring/summer 2017 collection.

Multicoloured wires sprung from the machines, replicated in both the invitation to the show – which saw the interlocking C’s formed from cables – as well as some of the detail in the clothing line itself, a reworking of the brand’s traditional tweed. The flashing green lights from the data farm were even mirrored in LEDs that appeared on some of the brand’s handbags.

Meanwhile, “bots” walked the runway too. Two models opened the show wearing a headpiece largely reminiscent of Pepper – the small humanoid robot by Aldebaran Robotics and SoftBank, which has been working in various retail stores this year. Other coverage also referenced the idea of Storm Troopers or even virtual reality headsets.

Data Chanel fashion PFW
A bot walks in front of the Data Center Chanel setup at Paris Fashion Week (Image via @SusieBubble)

The big focus was on hardware, but it was of course a greater nod to all things digital. On the one hand, the entire setup could have been a narrative on modern consumers’ lives – the idea we’re all ruled by data; an awareness of just how much we individually share, a tangible replication of the servers behind our connected worlds. As Robin Givhan, fashion critic at the Washington Post, tweeted: “We’re all just bits of data.”

Perhaps it was also a more conceptual thought about all of us operating like bots in the screen era too, or even that bots themselves are becoming more prevalent in our communications and beyond – the algorithms shaping our lives. It was a look to the future some might say, and indeed a reflection on current day.

But there seemed an even greater underlying reference, and that was around the idea that Chanel’s roadmap lies in becoming itself just a series of data. And this is where the future of luxury comes in.

Any brand thinking about long-term growth strategy knows that data is at the very heart of finding that success. But data must fundamentally come from e-commerce, for which many luxury brands are still a stranger – Chanel included.

For many of them, this has been because they could find growth elsewhere, notably in China. As Luca Solca, managing director of luxury goods at Exane BNP Paribas, told me for a story for the Business of Fashion last year: “[With a slowing China market] e-commerce is one of very few ways luxury goods companies can now grow.”


A video posted by CHANEL (@chanelofficial) on

The numbers make sense to do so: from 2009 to 2014, online sales of luxury goods grew four times faster than offline sales. In fact, in 2014, nearly all luxury market growth came from e-commerce, up 50% from 2013. And yet that figure is still only at 6% of total sales demonstrating how much space digital still has to grow. McKinsey expects it to triple to 18% by 2025.

Chanel has previously promised it will launch its e-commerce site by the end of 2016. For the same BoF story, Lindsay Nuttall, CDO at advertising agency BBH, which has worked with brands like Burberry, said going direct-to-consumer in a bid to have control over customers’ online data is essential. “The fact [many luxury brands have] given part of their supply chain away to third parties like Net-a-Porter could prove an increasing problem over time. It can affect really practical things, like their margins, and really huge things like their route to the customer. By not collecting data on them, you don’t understand how they’re evolving,” she explained.

In short then, the Chanel show really could be a precursor to the fact it’s finally about to go headfirst into e-commerce. It’s a true nod to the future of luxury and to a much more integrated, customer-first and data-led strategy, enabled by a final push into online transactions.