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Campaigns technology

Emporio Armani creates life-like 3D printed ad

A new outdoor advertising campaign from Emporio Armani has turned to 3D printing to make its designs come to life.

The ad features a 3D version of the model’s right leg extending out of the billboard, making it seem as though she is stepping into the real world.

The effect was created by an Italian 3D printing and industrial photography company called Colorzenith, which printed the foot and a partial leg to then attach it to the billboard.

The company explains that for the project it used a Gel Dispensing Printing (GDP) technology, which differs from the more mainstream application of other polymer-based 3D printing processes.

Out of home advertising is getting a new lease of life in a digital-first world, with other brands increasingly using the medium in innovative ways.

For example last year Adidas Originals launched a campaign to promote the launch of its P.O.D. shoe, for which it set up a series of personalized outdoor ads in Los Angeles and New York, which each spoke individually to a group of influencers.

While this is new territory for Emporio Armani, the label has been expanding its focus on lifestyle and hospitality, having very recently re-launched its Empori Caffè and Ristorante in Milan, which now sits in the same building as the Armani Hotel and the Emporio Armani megastore.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about helping you build innovative integrations and experiences. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology, powered by a network of top startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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product sustainability

Ocean Outdoor creates accessories out of recycled billboards for London Fashion Week

UK outdoor media owner Ocean Outdoor is teaming up with eco-label VIN + OMI to launch an exclusive collection during London Fashion Week that will be manufactured entirely from vinyl panels taken from billboard displays.

The partnership will feature men’s and women’s accessories and not be available for sale. Instead, Ocean will donate the pieces to its charity partner, the Marine Conservation Society, to help fund the fight against plastic pollution in order to protect the world’s oceans and marine line. This is in one with Ocean’s commitment to staying at the forefront of innovation, as the majority of its out-of-home advertising is already purely digital.

“As a 95 percent based digital media company, Ocean is actively moving away from the use of vinyl,” said Liliana Teixeira, Ocean’s senior marketing executive. “That said, it’s important we find the best possible way to upcycle the vinyl we do still use. This partnership also allows us to support emerging creative talent which adds to its scale and impact,”

UK-born VIN + OMI works in developing recycled polyester (rPET) textiles, including silk-like finishes and wool which are spun from salvaged plastic primarily sourced from rivers and oceans. For this project, it will be working with students from Oxford Brookes University who will help design the collection. This means that in addition teaching a new generation how to work with sustainable garments, the project will further bring together a community with the common goal of raising awareness to the cause.

The range will feature at VIN + OMI’s London Fashion Week show on February 14, while Ocean will display highlights of the presentation on February 18 across its The Grid digital displays country-wide as well as on the iconic Piccadilly Lights display in Piccadilly Circus, London. Last fashion week season, Ocean teamed up with designer Victoria Beckham to livestream her show on the same screens, marking the first time the company streamed live content on its 4K displays.

Are you thinking innovatively enough about sustainability? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Campaigns Editor's pick social media

Adidas Originals speaks to influencers via personalized billboards

adidas Originals influencer marketing billboard campaign
adidas Originals campaign

Adidas Originals’ latest offline campaign speaks to a group of influencers individually through a series of personalized billboards in Los Angeles and New York, promoting the launch of the P.O.D. shoe.

The brand worked with Clear Channel Outdoor to create 16 out of home ads calling out each influencer, including Tony Mui, who works at Complex magazine and hosts a YouTube channel; Kalysse Anthony, model and stylist; and Scott Reyes, an LA-based photographer.

Each billboard references the influencer’s social media handle and a message directly related to their personal lives that they have shared on social media, with a call to action to head to the nearest Adidas store to pick up the new sneakers. User Jacques Slade (@kustoo), for instance, was told to grab a pair for his next unboxing episode, while Tyler Glickman (@t_glick) was congratulated for recently getting married.

Adidas has been increasingly experimenting with personalized marketing to engage with an audience that is highly distracted by their digital behaviours. During 2018’s Boston Marathon, the sportswear brand created 30,000 personalized videos, one for each runner participating, by using data generated by the RFID-enabled running bibs. That data, combined with footage from seven different cameras stretched throughout the course, generated individual videos available to watch and share online after the race.

At the same time, out of home advertising is experiencing somewhat of a reawakening as marketers tap into the young consumer’s need for creating content. At this year’s Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, Glossier president and COO. Henry Davis, explained that billboards are a great strategy for the cult beauty brand because they are just the beginning of the conversation – as consumers spot the billboard, they feel compelled to photograph it and create and share (digital) content themselves, thus taking ownership of that conversation with the brand.

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business e-commerce

Out of home screens look to capitalise on fashion week’s see-now, buy-now moves

Ocean out of home LFW
Ocean’s out of home screens in London

Ocean is broadcasting live from London Fashion Week (LFW) this season with exclusive content from the shows as well as previews and highlights throughout the five days of events.

Displayed on large format digital screens across the UK, Ocean is building on last season’s successful collaboration with the British Fashion Council (BFC), when it became the first out of home (OOH) media owner in the country to live stream directly from LFW, reaching a reported 11.5 million people.

While OOH might be considered a more traditional advertising route, it’s positioning itself to be considered part of the new wave of digital innovations reshaping the fashion industry. Seemingly there’s never been a better time.

On the eve of LFW (which generates over £100 million of orders each season, contributing to the £28 billion that goes into the UK economy from the fashion industry), Natalie Massenet, chairman of the BFC, commented: “Our designers continue to grow their businesses, embrace technology and innovate. In February, Burberry ignited the movement of ‘see-now, buy-now’, which was seen in NY and will now be seen in London.”

Indeed, numerous British brands are realising the potential to increase revenue by selling direct-to-customer during fashion week, and adopting the “see-now, buy-now” model accordingly. Providers like Ocean, which offer an alternative way of reaching consumers, stand to benefit accordingly.

Ocean CEO Tim Bleakley said: “Our ongoing collaboration with the British Fashion Council amplifies the fact that some of the labels will be showing see-now, buy-now collections. Out of home screens allow designers and retailers to reach and influence significant audiences across the UK.”

Half of Ocean’s 14 screens are positioned outside London, including in Birmingham, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester and Newcastle.

Before the digital era, LFW was strictly a trade-only affair, bringing collections together in order to be viewed solely by those working in the global fashion industry. With so much change afoot, Ocean is one of many providers who will be looking to capitalise further on this shift to a consumer-facing event, offering brands another channel to reach consumers in real-time.

Categories
e-commerce Editor's pick mobile technology

Burberry’s latest big idea – 3D digital fun in London

burberry__dreamworks

Another day, another tech initiative from Burberry. The company has linked up with DreamWorks Animation for a product campaign making use of 3D tech and the world-famous Piccadilly Circus, London, curved screen.

Passers-by will be able to design a personalised heritage scarf on their smartphones and the result will appear on the screen, according to reports. The same NOVA tech DreamWorks used in Kung Fu Panda will be employed, and just like Dreamworks’ output, Burberry wants it to be entertaining as well as encouraging us to buy more product.

Burberry CEO, creative chief and all-round tech-visionary-at-large Christopher Bailey told the Telegraph: “The huge screens in Piccadilly Circus give us a great canvas to launch the technology in a space that will show the possibilities of what [it] can do in an entertaining and engaging way. Giving users the ability to control their movement in various ways makes the experience much more personal when viewed on a screen, whether at home or on a digital billboard.”

Once the personalised scarf has been created, the potential customer can then buy it online or from the regent Street flagship just up the road.

But it really is just just about selling more stuff, right? Over to Bailey again: “The campaigns we create are not developed with a purely commercial imperative. Our aim is to identify platforms where we can create interesting content that we believe audiences will enjoy so that our relationship with them can extend beyond the purely transactional.”

The fact is that Burberry has become a master of entertaining and intriguing its audience in recent years while also boosting sales. That it’s chosen the scarf for this initiative is key as Burberry is as much about heritage as it is about fashion.

But it’s doing a pretty good job of bringing heritage product into the 21st century via a combination of forward-looking digital technology and personalisation services that underscore the luxury profile of the brand.

For now, the screen at Piccadilly Circus will be an extension of its online and in-store scarf bars and it’s likely to garner A LOT of attention for the brand.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

Categories
data e-commerce Editor's pick social media

British brands enabling fans to shop real-time #LFW trends by leveraging outdoor advertising

This post first appeared on Forbes.com

Despite fashion week being all about what clothes we’re going to wear next season, brands including Hunter Original and Topshop will push current stock in a big way when London begins from Friday.

Both are turning to digital screens up and down the UK in Ocean Outdoor’s network, in a bid to truly capitalize on the hype that London Fashion Week brings. They will run real-time out-of-home (OOH) campaigns that not only provide consumers with more access to the event than ever before, but encourage them to actually shop by placing existing product, rather than new, front and center.

The fashion industry has struggled to solve the conundrum that building huge hype during fashion week season brings, when that tends to be six months before products hit the shop floor. Essentially, by the time the collections arrive, the shopper is already on to the next. Burberry was one of the first to make some of its line available for purchase immediately as far back as 2010, in response. Numerous other brands have followed suit since, including as recently as Tommy Hilfiger yesterday in New York.

But that idea only goes so far in practice. By the nature of their release, those items tend to be limited in numbers; either pre-produced thus run as more of a campaign (Tommy Hilfiger), or available for pre-order and delivery in just a few weeks on items that are straightforward to do so with (Burberry). Shifting the production process any further is quite an ordeal for most design houses, but for those on the high street it can be quite a different story.

“Since Burberry first [live streamed its show] there has been a slow trickle of better accessibility and speed to market from fashion week,” Lindsay Nuttall, chief digital officer of BBH and former global head of strategy and communications at Asos , told me. “Zara famously turn around production in a rapid process to soak up demand piqued by fashion week coverage. At ASOS we would provide guides of the key trends from each season for fashion hungry customers that related directly to current stock we were carrying. Innovation in digital formats like mobile and digital outdoor is shifting this up a gear now and taking it out to the mainstream consumer.”

Hunter and Topshop will be some of the first examples of brands making fashion week shoppable by promoting current, and therefore assumedly less limited, stock in conjunction with their shows.

Hunter-Original-outdoor

Hunter will kickstart its initiative by live streaming from its catwalk on Monday February 23 at 6pm GMT simultaneously across nine billboards. Run by agency Candyspace, this digital first for the industry (Burberry previously live streamed its show on just one billboard in London’s Piccadilly Circus), will hit high-traffic retail environments in London, Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool and Glasgow. Messaging alongside the show will drive the audience to Hunterboots.com, as will a content takeover on the landing page of the WiFi-enabled sites for those logging in via their mobiles.

The brand will continue its campaign for three further days after the show, pairing content from the new Fall 2015 collection alongside similar pieces already available for purchase this season, including a poncho, parka and boot. By focusing on core silhouettes and ‘icon’ styles, rather than merely newness, the brand aims to offer the inspiration, not to mention the functionality, for immediate purchase.

Topshop meanwhile has partnered with Twitter to showcase  key trends emerging from London Fashion Week according to tweets using the #LFW hashtag. That real-time data will be fed through to billboards around the country from Friday February 20 until Tuesday February 24. It will be displayed as a word cloud and placed alongside corresponding shoppable Topshop product.

Consumers will also be invited to tweet to @Topshop with any one of the trends highlighted (it might be #pleats or #colourblocking for instance), to then receive a curated shopping list in response. Six billboards – all of which are within 10 minutes walking distance of a Topshop store – will be utilized for the time period. The experience will be replicated in one of the Topshop Oxford Circus windows as well as viaTopshop.com.

Sheena Sauvaire, global marketing and communications director at Topshop, said: “Through Twitter’s listening power, we can allow our global consumer to shop the trends as and when they happen, and give them insight and access into runway shows. The idea of live advertising is just beginning, and thanks to the Ocean Outdoor sites, this will be a first example of real-time shoppable billboards.”

TS-Twitter2-Copy-1940x844

For both Hunter and Topshop, which are of course two of the more accessible fashion week brands in terms of price point, it’s a smart move to marry fresh and buzzworthy content with current stock. It’s smarter again to facilitate the shopping element of it all by integrating a seamless mobile experience, says Nuttall. “Linking everything to mobile means awareness and engagement is never more than one swipe away from converting to purchase, right there and then, wherever they are.”

Both campaigns have the potential to not only satisfy consumer appetite, but also provide measurable return on investment (ROI) on what would otherwise be a pure brand awareness push.

As the Hunter team said in a statement: “[It] will allow Hunter to capitalize on the heightened brand attention afforded by London Fashion Week and maximize this considerable commercial opportunity, addressing the challenge to drive sales six months before the runway collection lands in stores.”

This focus on ROI also comes at a time when the industry seems to be moving away from large scale, or more PR-worthy, innovation usually seen during fashion week – think drones at Fendi or a 4-D water show from Polo Ralph Lauren. Instead the emphasis so far in New York this season has been on social media programs that drive conversion, according to WWD.

As Melisa Goldie, chief marketing officer of Calvin Klein, told the paper: “You can have millions and millions of eyeballs, but if there’s no real conversation it’s nothing but a bunch of eyeballs… We really want to show that we are getting a return on our investment that is beyond just brand awareness and buzz. That is the next phase of digital.”

OOH done well has the potential to fit within that remit. Says Nuttall: “Outdoor has always been a brilliantly high impact and creative medium. It’s also always been able to reach a burgeoning young fashion consumer at a key moment that is both inherently social and ripe for conversion – when they are out and about shopping with their friends.”

The idea of a shoppable OOH campaign is “hard working commercial stuff”, she adds. “If the fashion industry embraces the creative and commercial opportunity that it represents, it will be really exciting to see where they take it.”

Categories
data Editor's pick social media

Topshop wins outdoor ad contest with real-time Twitter trends concept

TopShop Art of Outdoor

Real-time data integration is something we’re tracking across out-of-home advertising at present, making it no surprise to hear the winner of Ocean’s fifth annual Art of Outdoor digital awards follows along the same lines.

Topshop took the top spot in the Creative Techniques category for a campaign called #toptrends. This sees real-time Twitter data feeding information to the digital screens about styles and trends being talked about from London Fashion Week. Equivalent Topshop product is shown alongside, including apparel, accessories and beauty.

Time of day, location of the screen and the weather all impact the content displayed, increasing relevancy to the viewer. As the accompanying video (below) shows, if it’s raining in Glasgow the data will surface product more suited to that weather condition like boots and jackets, compared to if it’s sunny in London. The morning will also show day time looks, while evening trends will appear as the sun goes down.

The entries in Ocean’s contest are concepts at this stage, with the winners given the opportunity to run their campaigns across its Grid network in 2015. Topshop’s will tie in with London Fashion Week in February for the autumn/winter 2015/16 shows. Each site that will be used is no more than a 10 minute walk away from a Topshop store.

The Interative Category of the contest also hosted a retail winner – The North Face for its campaign called The Thermoball Jacket, Creating Warm Leads. This sees the brand’s hero jacket placed on the screen while cameras and thermal imagery pinpoint who the coldest shoppers are nearby. Brand ambassadors alongside are able to then show those individuals just how low their body temperature is and offer them a jacket to try on to visibly see it increase. A discount code will be offered to each to buy one at their nearest store.

First place in this category went to domestic violence charity Women’s Aid, for a campaign utilising facial recognition technology to demonstrate how it only takes one person to notice domestic abuse to start making a change. Other winners included British Airways, Spotify and NEST.

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data e-commerce Editor's pick

Net-a-Porter showcases real-time shopper trends in digital out-of-home campaign

netaporter-CW

Data visualisation continues abound with news of Net-a-Porter’s new out-of-home campaign showcasing live shopper trends from around the world.

Hosted on an Ocean Outdoors screen in Canary Wharf, London, the initiative brings to life purchases taking place on the luxury e-commerce site as they happen in real-time. Running as an extension of the Net-a-Porter Live project hosted online, it presents imagery of the exact pieces being bought as well as the specific country the customer is transacting from. There is also a live count of shoppers online.

Leila Ratnani, international account director at Havas Media, who managed the creative concept and execution alongside PSI and Liveposter, said: “Since its launch last year, Net-a-Porter Live has set the brand apart from its luxury retail competitors and raised the bar for online customer experiences. Being able to further bring this campaign to life via digital out-of-home is a great opportunity for the Net-a-Porter brand and its followers alike.”

The campaign will be in place for two weeks. It is Net-a-Porter’s first foray into outdoor advertising.