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business data digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media sustainability technology

What you missed: Gap’s AR dressing room app, smart hairbrushes, Brexit’s impact on fashion

Gap's AR dressing room app with Google
Gap’s AR dressing room app with Google

Happy New Year and welcome to 2017… may it be a fortuitous one for all of us; the industry at large included. On that note, here’s a wrap up of everything you might have missed over the holidays and this past week, from new tech at CES to lots of thoughts on what to expect in the market throughout this year.

Also worth checking out is an interview on sustainability with Kering’s François-Henri Pinault, a deep-dive on all things WeChat (seriously a must-read), and an exploration of the worker robots hitting Japan. If you haven’t seen it, don’t forget to also check out our list of the 8 tech trends that will shape fashion and luxury retail in 2017.


TOP STORIES
  • Google moves into augmented reality shopping with BMW and Gap [Bloomberg]
  • L’Oréal launches smart hairbrush at CES: a bargain at $189? [AdAge]
  • How Brexit will impact fashion in 2017 [BoF]
  • The future of fashion is mushroom leather – Kering’s François-Henri Pinault on sustainability [Bloomberg]
  • Why Alexander Wang’s Adidas collection was sold in unmarked trucks and trash bags [Co.Create]
  • Selfridges unveils new plan to promote sustainable fashion [Dazed]

BUSINESS
  • In 2017’s “new normal,” luxury brands will have to work a lot harder to sell their pricey goods [QZ]
  • For the Trumps, ‘Made in USA’ may be a tricky label to stitch [NY Times]
  • Macy’s to cut more than 10,000 jobs and close 68 stores [AP]
  • Carolina Herrera is suing Oscar de la Renta over hiring of Monse designer [Hollywood Reporter]
  • Expect more store closings despite big holiday sales [USA Today]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • How social cash made WeChat the app for everything [Fast Company]
  • Snapchat, Facebook or Instagram: who is winning the social media shopping race? [BoF]
  • #Prada365: The brand’s new social, advertising strategy [TheFashionLaw]
  • 5 ways Snapchat Spectacles will affect influencer marketing in 2017 [AdWeek]
  • How fashion publishers are experimenting with Instagram Live [Glossy]
  • Here’s a timeline showing Instagram and Snapchat’s 2016 war over the best features [AdWeek]
  • Infographic: How millennials and baby boomers consume user-generated content [AdWeek]

RETAIL
  • Here come ‘smart stores’ with robots, interactive shelves [AP]
  • How tech drove retailer turnaround efforts in 2016 [Retail Dive]
  • Harrods incorporates in-store navigation tool in latest app update [LuxuryDaily]
  • The internet goes IRL at ModCloth’s new store [Racked]
  • What everyone will be buzzing about at NRF Retail’s BIG Show 2017 [IBM]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Japanese white-collar workers are already being replaced by artificial intelligence [QZ]
  • Amazon patent reveals its drone-deploying flying warehouse plan [Engadget]
  • Cross-border payment technology creates global opportunities [WWD]
  • Wearables gradually move beyond the wrist, and into hearts and minds (literally) [CNBC]
  • Shiseido Group invests in beauty technologies to maintain competitive edge [LuxuryDaily]
Categories
e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Social commerce proves key digital trend for S/S 15 fashion weeks

This post first appeared on WGSN.com/blogs

burberry
Burberry S/S 15

Fashion week season might traditionally be about what the next trends in apparel and accessories are set to be, but increasingly it’s becoming just as much of a hotbed for lighting up new opportunities in digital and social media.

During New York and London there were familiar themes like utilising influencers (Tommy Hilfiger and Topshop) or democratising the fashion show by providing more access behind-the-scenes and into the design process than ever before (Michael Kors and Rebecca Minkoff).

For many, however, it was about pushing commerce much more than it was purely communications. Brands including Burberry, BCBG Max Azria, Oscar de la Renta and more, all introduced some kind of shoppable feature to their social media, upping the game of the “buy now runway” feature far more than we’ve seen in the past.

Burberry partnered with Twitter to trial its new ‘buy now’ button. Users in the US could instantly click to purchase the brand’s S/S 15 nail polish, ticking the box for a sense of instant gratification attached to a live stream show. The move was a smart one for a brand looking to capture digitally-savvy fans who can’t perhaps afford the main catwalk collection, but are increasingly in tune with beauty and fragrance offerings being heavily pushed via social these days.

burberry_nails
Burberry’s S/S 15 nail colours

BCBG Max Azria meanwhile, teamed up with RewardStyle’s LiketoKnow:It application, which aims to make Instagram shoppable. Looks posted by influencers on their Instagram accounts during the show were available for purchase to those signed up to LiketoKnow:It service – it’s a little bit clunky, but doing so enables users to like an image to instantly have an email sent to them with details about the items featured, then click to purchase from there. Vogue and Nordstrom have also used this service previously.

Another new app called Spring also played a part in providing a sense of shopability to this fashion week season in New York. This mobile marketplace, as it refers to itself, saw brands including Oscar de la Renta, Zac Posen and Libertine offering exclusive items available for purchase straight after their catwalk shows.

For Oscar that was in the form of an embroidered peep-toe sandal. For Libertine it was limited edition t-shirts, while for Zac Posen it was his first eyewear collection.

It’s early days on all these social commerce fronts, with lots of clunky kinks still to be ironed out. But seemingly the idea for limited edition or exclusive access to certain product – in numerous instances the more affordable stuff no less – available on platforms that users are already engaging on, feels like a fresh and sensible move for an industry up against increasing pressure to deliver goods in real-time.

While fully shoppable looks at the likes of Versus by Versace, Topshop and Moschino continued on e-commerce sites and in stores too, expect more of this social commerce to follow. Gone are the days of merely trying to make our Facebook feeds transactional (and failing at that); we’re in a whole new era of third party apps and in-stream features that might just start to work.

Oscar-de-la-Renta-Shoe
Oscar de la Renta’s S/S 15 embroidered peep-toe sandal
Categories
social media

Anna Wintour sparks #voguestagram meme

anna-wintour-instagram-debut

This week saw what must be the most fashion-fuelled meme of all time. Enter #voguestagram, the Instagrammed shots of individuals copying Anna Wintour toting her September-issue (all 902 pages of it), as above.

There’s been some 1,700 posted reportedly, with everyone from Oscar de la Renta to Francisco Costa at Calvin Klein joining in. Check out 15 of the best, below – Nacho Figueras wins it for me.

Oscar@oscarprgirl: Oscar’s #voguestagram #theseptemberissue @voguemagazine xoxo 

CK@calvinklein: Costa’s Cover. #theseptemberissue @voguemagazine #voguestagram #franciscocosta

Choupette@choupettesdiary: Who says the #fashion set don’t work out? We lift the @VogueMagazine #SeptemberIssue #Voguestagram

Vogue.com@voguemagazine: Vogue.com caught the #voguestagram bug. #theseptemberissue

JCrew@jcrew: Just catching up on some light reading. #voguestagram #TheSeptemberIssue @voguemagazine

Minkoff@rebeccaminkoff: Essential reading @voguemagazine #theseptemberissue #voguestagram

Nachos@nachofigueras: @voguemagazine #theseptemberissue #voguestagram + @ralphlauren Romance @delfinablaquier and me on horses

CFDA@cfda: Look who we caught flipping through #theseptemberissue of @voguemagazine… @stevenkolb #voguestagram

Esteelauder@esteelauder: Reading the September issue with Estée. #voguestagram #theseptemberissue @voguemagazine

CocoRocha@cocorocha: I’m in 3 pages out of 902. Spot me if you can. #voguestagram @voguemagazine

ZacPosen@zac_posen: Showroom reading before a fitting. #voguestagram #theseptemberissue @voguemagazine

Herrera@houseofherrera: #carolinaherrera #spring2014 fitting distraction #voguestagram #TheSeptemberIssue

BryanBoy@bryanboycom: Just boarded my flight. Bon voyage with #theseptemberissue #voguestagram

LaForceStevens@laforcestevens: The things we do for @VogueMagazine! #theseptemberissue #voguestagram

CaroSieber@carosieber: back from honeymoon and reading all about a certain wedding . Thank you @voguemagazine it looks fantastic #voguestagram #TheSeptemberIssue

Categories
social media

Oscar de la Renta campaign launches exclusively over Instagram

oscardelarenta_instagram5

According to L2 Think Tank, Instagram registers the highest level of consumer engagement and interaction across all social media platforms. Needless to say, brands are capitalising on that – and none more so than Oscar de la Renta this week, who released its autumn/winter 2013/14 campaign exclusively via its OscarPRGirl account

Those images – as featured below – are also accompanied by an e-commerce tie-in on Oscardelarenta.com, where the full corresponding collection is available for pre-order, ranging from $110 costume jewellery to gowns at nearly $14,000.

According to Oscar CEO, Alex Bolen, the initiative has the promise of being “extremely measurable”, reports WWD. The brand will be able to see how successful it is by tracking the amount of clicks to its website, not to mention preorder sales in real-time.

“Forgetting that it’s via a fairly new distribution mode, this is about creative working harder for us,” Bolen said. “That’s forever been a challenge for people in our business. We’re always reviewing our print buys. We’re constantly trying to figure out ways to better measure the return that we’re getting on our investment… We will book more resources [to digital programs] if it works well, and less behind those that work less well.”

The campaign was shot by Norman Jean Roy and styled by Alex White, with make-up and hair by Gucci Westman and Orlando Pita. The models are Kate Bogucharskaia, Patricija Motiejunaite and Iris Van Berne.

oscardelarenta_instagram2 oscardelarenta_instagram3 oscardelarenta_instagram4 oscardelarenta_instagram6 oscardelarenta_instagram7 oscardelarenta_instagram1

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film social media

How fashion brands are using Vine

This article first appeared on Mashable

Fashionbrands_Vine

The fashion industry immediately embraced Vine, Twitter’s 6-second video app, after it launched in February. It was no surprise it was suddenly so popular: The app was released just two weeks before New York Fashion Week kicked off, a time when behind-the-scenes runway shots were readily available to capture and share in 6-second loops.

But Vine is much more difficult to make look beautiful and polished than Instagram photos, and brands quickly discovered that to participate, they needed to relax their typically stringent production quality requirements. Perhaps that’s why, following the shows, most fashion houses dropped the platform altogether, only returning to it, in some cases, for the menswear shows in London and Milan earlier this month.

That’s not to say that Vine’s fashion future is dead — it’s merely getting a slow start. Early data indicates that Vine videos are shared four times as often as other kinds of Internet video, and the launch of video for Instagram, which many brands have already enthusiastically adopted, is creating further incentive for fashion firms to ramp up their capabilities and resources in this area.

Let’s take a look at a few fashion brands using Vine to exceptional effect…

Stop motion art

Stop-motion artists are among Vine’s most popular users. Eyeing this trend, French Connection collaborated with photographer Meagan Cignoli to create a series of highly shareable, summer-themed stop-motion videos. In one video, the brand’s latest collection packs itself into a suitcase for a holiday. In another, various outfits are laid out and rolled up on the beach.

Cignoli tells me that each video typically has between 100 and 120 separately recorded clips. The result is incredibly fluid and eye-catching, instantly negating any notion that Vine can’t be a platform for quality creative work. Online retailer Nasty Gal is another standout for stop-motion inspiration, weaving playful, wiggling pieces of candy in and around products like handbags, shoes and makeup. Burberry, too, has used stop-motion video to showcase product prints and patterns, as well as celebrities present at its last menswear show.

Showcasing product details

The beauty of the French Connection work by Cignoli is that it places products front and center, but it’s so creative it doesn’t feel like marketing. Marc Jacobs is another example of a designer who is doing this, releasing some nice stop-motion work that features handbags on what looks like a rotating conveyor belt.

For others, Vine presents an opportunity to demonstrate the work that goes into making products. Matthew Williamson did this during London Fashion Week in February with his #matthewmagnified campaign, and Oscar de la Renta, through the handle OscarPRGirl, used Vine to detail the craftsmanship that goes into its bridalwear pieces.

Gap is also using Vine to highlight key pieces in-store, but takes a more editorial approach, employing models for its videos. In one, a woman spins around in an assortment of dresses. In another, a young girl plays in the latest DVF GapKids collection in the park. These are much more developed than the clips that debuted during fashion week season: a haphazard amalgamation of garments on hangers and poorly lit models on runways.

Injecting personality

Some brands’ Vine videos manage to be both beautifully produced and full of personality.

Urban Outfitters released short videos that are playful yet stylish at the same time. In one clip, a bunch of balloons float into an office. In another, the contents of a purse are being prepared ahead of a festival trip. In another stop-motion video, makeup carries itself into a bag. It’s worth noting that with more than 40,000 followers, Urban Outfitters is one of the most popular brands on Vine, proving that volume and frequency of posts can be a more successful formula than fewer, higher quality videos — as showcased by French Connection, which has just a fraction of Urban Outfitters’ followers.

Behind the scenes

As mentioned, fashion brands released a great deal of behind-the-scenes content on Vine during fashion week season. This is a trend that’s continued since the shows, with brands and retailers providing windows into their corporate headquarters, design studios and individual stores.

Marc Jacobs has used Vine to take followers on many journeys at its headquarters and stores, from the creation of its latest Resort collection campaign to celebrity interviews during in-store book signings. Using the hashtag #staffstyles, Marc Jacobs frequently showcases the prints and patterns worn by its employees. In another example, Bergdorf Goodman features staffers as they try on different pairs of sunglasses. The video is tied to a message about sun protection.

Puma recently released a series of Vine videos featuring Olympic champion Usain Bolt on the set of his latest campaign for the brand. The quick all-access videos, shot again by Cignoli, frequently allow Bolt’s own personality to come through. Meanwhile, Nordstrom has shown what it’s like at its stores after hours, with shoes whimsically moving about on shelves when customers aren’t there. In another video, a flying shirt leads followers on a magical tour through merchandise.

Beyond the obvious

One thing fashion and retail brands haven’t taken advantage of is the how-to video, which is a popular hashtag on Vine. Bergdorfs has done a beauty tutorial and Nordstrom has used Vine to show how to tie a tie, but there are plenty more opportunities here.

As autumn’s busy event calendar gets rolling and the fall collections hit stores, expect to see more behind-the-scenes footage as well as more close-up product shots. Though some brands’ participation has been impeded by corporate approval processes, there’s no doubt — especially with the recent launch of video on Instagram — that short-form video will become a more central part of the fashion industry’s output.

As Cignoli advises: “Fashion brands just need to let go a little and enjoy Vine for what it is, the quickness and easiness of it. If they can find a way to do that, it’s going to be much more beneficial even if what’s going out isn’t always the most amazing piece of content.”

Do you have any favorite fashion brands you follow on Vine?

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Comment social media technology

#SXSW Interactive in prep: a fashionable playing ground for 2013

FashionBrainBar_SXSW_main

If there was one thing I learnt from SXSW last year, it was that I absolutely had to go again in 2013. On top of the fact it’s the place to hear industry leaders  give expert insights, the place to learn about new innovations and source fresh inspirations, and the place where trends and directions for the tech world break… it’s also a breeding ground for incredible networking.

For anyone working within the fashion-meets-digital space, this seems especially the case this year, with more attendees headed to Austin from our industry than ever, as well as a host of relevant events to go with it.

Fashion’s Collective is hosting one of them, known as the Fashion Brain Bar on Monday, March 11 (as pictured above). It’s aim is to provide a bit of respite from the insanity of the festival, but also a space for everyone to meet the people they need to meet and have “the conversations that will play a key role in the advancements we’ll see over the next few years”.

Industry experts on hand will include Raman Kia, executive director of integrated strategy at Condé Nast through to Dave Gilboa, founder of Warby Parker. The full list can be seen here, as well as a space to submit questions to them in advance.

Another fringe event planned is called The Neighborhood. Created by AvecMode and 2nd Street District, it’s a move on from the Style X event of previous years, which brought a fashion focus (complete with runway shows) to Austin nearer the end of the festival. This time plans are in place from March 11 – 14 with a bit more of an industry edge. There are pop-up stores still, but also Q&A sessions with pros from the likes of Neiman Marcus, Michael Kors, Lyst, Refinery29 and more, as well as highlight interviews with menswear designers John Varvatos and Billy Reid.

The main SXSW schedule does of course feature a number of fashion-specific events too, including this one with Nina Garcia focused on the democratisation of high fashion. And this one featuring New York’s “digital it-crowd” in Aliza Licht, Cannon Hodge, Erika Bearman and John Jannuzzi (that’d be DKNY, Bergdorf Goodman, Oscar de la Renta and Lucky Magazine).

Fashion’s Collective has also published a survival guide to the whole five days, including must-attend events (lots of them non-fashion which I would highly recommend, there’s nothing like being inspired from outside your normal remit), as well as a handful of food and drink recommendations (indispensable).

I also love this guide from Andrew Hyde, called Ditch the Marketers, Find the Makers, it sums up the rest of the experience beautifully (be friendly to everyone, sit down when you can, put down your tech and look at people – yes really).

On that note mind you, if you’re going, drop me a line over Twitter. Assuming I can connect, I’d love to meet you.

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social media Uncategorized

Vine scores big with #NYFW crowd

If there’s one thing to note this New York Fashion Week it’s the enormous number of posts being shared on Twitter’s new video-sharing app, Vine.

Brands, media houses and industry personalities alike are getting into the habit, capturing six-second scenes from around the venues, backstage at the shows and of the collections on the catwalks themselves. Some of the big names include Victoria Beckham, Marc Jacobs, Oscar de la Renta, DKNY, Bergdorf Goodman, the CFDA, KCD, Glamour, Lucky, Elizabeth Holmes of the WSJ, Nina Garcia, Coco Rocha, Man Repeller and the list goes on…

It’s an obvious move for an industry that trades predominantly on visuals. Both Instagram and animated GIFs have been huge for exactly that reason, but the former was static and the latter too complicated to quickly create. Add them roughly together however and the result is something that shows fashion in all its glory – with movement and in real, raw detail. Better yet of course with Vine, in an instantly shareable format too.

“Vine is a big idea, yet it is a simple one—the two basic ingredients for a successful emerging technology recipe,” Raman Kia, Condé Nast Media’s executive director of digital strategy told Fashionista. “It is no wonder that some brands are quick to jump in and experiment with it. This is especially true of fashion brands which have often been amongst the first to experiment with emerging social media platforms.”

On Twitter, Amy Odell of Buzzfeed asked at the beginning of fashion week: “Are runway photos even worth tweeting anymore?? (Kimberly Ovitz) #nyfw pic.twitter.com/VS1wLOfv.” Model Coco Rocha replied: “@amyodell the only worthwhile means of sharing the runway this season is Vine.”

It’s still early days however, with certain refinements including sound, zoom and drafts needed on the platform. There are likely developments to come on what people opt to post too – the endless finale shots from fashion week have become somewhat repetitive for instance, albeit successful when from a good angle. (Note my attempt at better quality by cheating with the live-stream of marc by Marc Jacobs above).

Either way, expect to see a lot more in this space. In the meantime, here are a handful of the highlight Vines from #NYFW so far:

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digital snippets mobile social media Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Burberry, Donna Karan, Chanel, Oscar de la Renta, Sephora

As a final post for 2012, here’s one last round-up of stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week.

We’ll be back in January, as previously mentioned with a very exciting update… Until then, happy holidays!

Donna_Karan_atelier_app

  • Square to announce payment trial with Burberry, its first luxury brand partner [TheNextWeb]
  • Donna Karan launches new celebrity dressing app (as pictured) [WWD]
  • Chanel strengthens digital brand experience via site relaunch [Luxury Daily]
  • Oscar de la Renta taps social media to recruit focus group [L2 Think Tank]
  • Sephora wins digital innovator award in prestige category [WWD]
  • The 20 biggest brand fails of 2012, featuring Harvey Nichols, Gap and La Redoute [AdWeek]
  • Fashion 2.0: amongst promises of a perfect fit, what fits and what doesn’t? [BoF]
  • Shopping sites open brick and mortar stores [NY Times]
  • Retail display plays product demo when customers select various items [PSFK]
  • How Stylistpick used personalisation to increase conversions by 33% [Econsultancy]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Oscar de la Renta, Hugo Boss, Nike, Michael Kors, Dove, Target

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

  • Oscar de la Renta sells five Resort tees in first day via TheFancy (as pictured) [NY Times]
  • Hugo Boss hosts New Dimension Beijing event, live-streams new collection and campaign in 3-D [Hugo Boss]
  • Nike’s interactive ad challenges viewers to find secret content [PSFK]
  • Michael Kors opens new store via email, social video invite [Luxury Daily]
  • E-commerce in China: how the world’s biggest market buys online [Mashable]
  • Op-Ed: Are we failing to fulfill the potential of fashion film? [BoF]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Oscar de la Renta, Victoria Beckham, Kate Spade, Bloomingdale’s, Nike

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

  • Oscar de la Renta live pins bridal show (as pictured) [The Cut]
  • Victoria Beckham’s social whirl [WWD]
  • Bloomingdale’s virtual reality windows let shoppers try on shades [NY Daily News]
  • Nike creates new Twitter RSVP system to facilitate shoe releases [Stupid Dope]
  • New Balance Boston’s digital community board gives real-time running updates [PSFK]
  • LVMH on managing its brands on Facebook [WSJ]
  • US Elle tries Facebook commerce, launches shoppable trend guide [Mashable]
  • Fancy hits 500,000 users, 1,000 merchants [Gigaom]