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business Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce product Retail sustainability technology

Shopify’s $6.6m sustainability fund, TikTok’s global rise, the new lure of the mall

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Shopify looks to fight climate change, commits $6.6 million to new sustainability fund (BetaKit)
  • The strategy behind TikTok’s global rise (Harvard Business Review)
  • Can rollercoasters and a bunny garden lure shoppers back to the mall? (BoF)
  • Germany unveils Green Button: what you need to know about the worlds first sustainable textile label (Fashion United)
TECHNOLOGY
  • Pentland brands trials AR app (Drapers)
  • How technologies like RFID elevate the customer experience (Fashion United)
  • Luxury retailers are ladling on perks to please ultra-rich clients (Wired)
  • Coca-Cola cans activate animated stories in AR (Mobile Marketer)
  • Entrupy is an app that helps authenticate your grails (Highsnobiety)
  • McDonald’s uses AI for ordering at drive-throughs (BBC News)
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • How designers are trying to make NYFW more sustainable (Nylon)
  • Gucci vies to be even greener (NYT)
  • Stella McCartney pens an urgent letter to the fashion industry (The Times)
  • Biodegradable clothes may fix fashion’s huge waste problem (Wired)
  • Second-hand fashion hits £187m on eBay (Fashion United)
  • Harvey Nichols dips a toe into the circular economy (Vogue Business)
  • H&M announces initiative to increase e-commerce sustainability (Fashion United)
  • Sainsbury vows to halve plastic packaging by 2025 (Retail Gazette)
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
BUSINESS
  • Philip Green’s Topshop & Topman report £505m loss (The Guardian)
  • New York’s Fashion Week revamp: did it work? (BoF)
  • New MD at Net-a-Porter (Drapers)
  • C&A files to begin IPO Process in Brazil (BoF)
  • Q&A with Mark Parker, CEO of Nike (Fast Company)
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • ‘We’re doing an evolution’: Inside Playboy’s extreme makeover (Digiday)
  • In London, is Extinction Rebellion out-marketing fashion? (BoF)
PRODUCT
  • Kim Kardashian’s Skims solutionwear launches online (Fashion United)
  • Duchess of Sussex’s new charity workwear collection (Vogue Business)
CULTURE
  • James Scully calls out ‘distressing’ treatment of models at NYFW (Dazed)
  • Macy’s announces 5-point plan to promote diversity and inclusion (Fashion United)
  • How to prevent your company from cultural appropriation (Forbes)
  • How cancel culture is affecting brands (Digiday)
  • PrettyLittleThing champions diversity at NYFW (Fashion United)
  • CurvyCon proves the future of fashion is fat (Fashionista)
  • M&S presents sunflower lanyards to support customer with disabilities (Retail Gazette)

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Categories
social media

Oasis invites consumers to #springasmile with virtual good deed generator

SpringASmile1

Spring cheer is in the air over at Oasis just in time for Easter, with a new campaign encouraging consumers to undertake simple acts of kindness in a bid to make people smile.

The UK-based retailer has introduced a virtual good deed generator at springasmile.com that inspires users with ideas for things they could do through a slot machine-like experience. At the click of a button (spin), keywords like ‘buy’, ‘give’ and ‘make’ are surfaced in the left hand window, alongside ‘someone flowers’ through to ‘coffee for the next person in line’ on the right.

springasmile_oasis2

Once achieved, the user is invited to nominate three friends to do the same via Facebook or Twitter before they receive a plaque stating what they’ve pledged. Oasis refers to this as the “perfect way to pay it forward and raise a smile amongst even the grumpiest of friends”.

The site also encourages users to revisit and upload a photo or video of their #springasmile in action into the “good deeds album”. All round, it’s a lovely and very sweet experience.

Side note – some of the early tweets around #springasmile come from employees at the company. If anyone thought this was a campaign just for external consumption you’d be wrong. The positive effect it’s seemingly had internally is impressive. One such comment: “Even though I had a crazy day and left 2 hours after eveyone else I had the best day! Can’t stop grinning :D… Thats when you know you’ve chosen the right career and you work for lovely people! #springasmile.”

Below too is what the head office therefore looked like this week (Image credit: @AmieMartin_). A winner through and through…

Oasis_springasmile2

Categories
e-commerce social media Uncategorized

#smwf offers coffee shop analogy for retailers, repeats control vs presence argument

Social media can be likened to the coffee shop opposite your store, according to JC Mighty, e-commerce communications manager at Aurora Fashions, which owns UK high street brands Karen Millen, Oasis and Warehouse.

Speaking as part of a panel on social shopping at the Social Media World Forum (#smwf) today, he said: “Our website is like our store, email is the window of the store, and social is the coffee shop across the road from the store.”

In so doing, he aimed to banish the notion fashion brands should fear “losing control” through the social space – (it’s somewhat astounding this is still raised as a discussion point, but it proved, as on many other occasions, a key question to the panel this afternoon).

Mighty explained while in this online world, much like its offline counterpart, you can’t control what consumers are saying, if you go into the “cafe” you can at least engage with them there.

“The customer exists in that space, talks in that space… it’s not control we need to regain, but presence we need to establish,” he said.

At some point, I hope we manage to stop repeating that very fact, the having to define what social is in order to encourage retailers on board. It would seem, perhaps surprisingly however, we’re not yet there.