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Editor’s letter: Welcome to TheCurrent Daily!

Welcome to TheCurrent Daily - news, fashion, innovation, technology
Welcome to TheCurrent Daily

Welcome to TheCurrent Daily, the new home of Fashion & Mash, and your leading global news source for all things fashion and innovation focused.

I’ve spent the past seven years building a rich library of 1,500 articles chronicling the industry throughout the digital era, capturing its evolution in everything from e-commerce and social media marketing, through to all things new in machine learning, augmented reality and smart textiles.

TheCurrent Daily will now continue this legacy, scaling to a global level tracking the big innovations and key disruptors impacting fashion, retail and lifestyle brands, and the startups you need to know about behind them.

The site is backed by global innovation firm, TheCurrent, which fuels growth at the intersection of technology, fashion and retail. In today’s toughening retail environment and rapidly evolving consumer landscape, success comes from leveraging specialized knowledge and harnessing external expertise. TheCurrent’s methodology is based on using open innovation to ignite powerful partnerships; facilitating collaboration with startups, entrepreneurs and established tech companies worldwide to drive measurable results.

Both are also complemented by TheCurrent Innovators podcast, which is produced and distributed by MouthMedia Network, and co-hosted by TheCurrent’s founder and CEO, Liz Bacelar, and myself, Chief Intelligence Officer, Rachel Arthur. At its core, the series is a weekly conversation with visionaries, executives, entrepreneurs and high-level players discussing the evolution of retail and consumer goods through technology.

I so look forward to having you along with us on this journey of exploration as we continue to track the change agents shaping the connected world in which we live. Do sign up to receive our daily newsletters if you haven’t already, be sure to download our podcast and follow along with us on all social media via @thecurrentdaily.

Best wishes,

Rachel Arthur
Chief Intelligence Officer
TheCurrent

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technology

Fendi drones: tech for tech’s sake or smart #MFW move?

Fendi_drone

The big story coming out of Milan Fashion Week today was of course about the Fendi drones.

Referred to as a sign of the luxury house’s commitment to “innovation and creativity”, the initiative saw four drones installed with cameras recording its autumn/winter 2014/15 show. As they flew above the runway, that footage was beamed back to those watching online at home.

“The main reason for doing this is to be able to offer impressive images and an experience that even surpasses being at the actual show,” Pietro Beccari, president and chief executive officer of Fendi, told WWD ahead of the event.

So a couple of key thoughts…

First off, Beccari also said the drones – which were powered by Parrot and in collaboration with the creative department of Google – wouldn’t be at all disruptive. “They are small, and we will increasingly get used to such technology,” he said. That might well be the case, but we’re not used to them yet, which meant most people actually in attendance in Milan focused predominantly on the bots over the collection.

Note several of the below Instagram posts, and this tweet from the FT’s Vanessa Friedman:

As far as publicity goes, that’s not a bad thing of course (more on that in a minute) – fashion shows as entertainment are by no means a new concept, after all.

What should have been spot on though, was the experience for those at home. Beccari said it would be completely “immersive and unprecedented”, thus far better than watching in person from the front row – so what was expected was a high-definition, up-close view.

A dashboard on the Fendi website hosted both a classic stream of the show and the “Drone Cam” to choose from. Like Topshop has done in the past, viewers could take snapshots of whichever they were watching and then share those collection images with their Facebook and Google+ friends and followers.

Unfortunately, the quality of the drone recording was, for all intents and purposes, awful. Up-close and personal? It was not. The shapes of the pieces the models were wearing could barely be made out, let alone the finer details of the line. The snapshot tool did work, as you can see in the screengrab below (which also documents the blurry runway), but the share function didn’t; merely clicking through to Facebook, before just getting stuck.

That was both the case with the live-stream version and the on-demand recording that has been on the Fendi site since. In fact, the recording that is up there now is actually a slightly better version in terms of the drone camera used – a switch was clearly made post live event.

Fendi_dronecam

But back to the question in the title of this post, were the Fendi drones merely tech for tech’s sake or a smart Milan Fashion Week move? The answer, I’d argue, is both.

It goes without saying this was absolutely tech for tech’s sake. And by that I mean technology that is essentially pointless (the traditional live stream providing a far more detailed and therefore beautiful view), but is employed on the grounds of the fact it makes for a great, albeit gimmicky, story. This is how most big-budget retail technology launches currently operate.

And a great story it was. Given drones were already buzzworthy thanks to Amazon’s Jeff Bezos’ December 2012 announcement, this was a topic top of mind and tip of tongue for many people, not to mention key members of the press. Fendi captialised on that (smoothly avoiding anything along the lines of privacy or security concerns), and won key coverage in everything from The Guardian to Bloomberg as a result, with New York Magazine’s The Cut, The Times and Fashionista inbetween. The only angle otherwise hyped was the Karl Lagerfeld doll that model Cara Delevingne carried to both open and close the show – and even that also had a Big Brother camera in it.

Let’s not forget this is a big coup for Milan Fashion Week – hardly the epicentre of fashion and tech stories any prior season. Fendi, under the creative direction of Lagerfeld, is also not the first brand you’d think of to lead in this space. Burberry maybe. Diane von Furstenberg perhaps. Even Dolce & Gabbana at a push, but not likely Fendi.

Beccari referred to the company’s investment in the development of its digital content as a bid to speak to a younger customer base. One thing’s for sure, there’s a whole raft of tech (and journo) types who have at least now heard of that brand called Fendi. And on that basis, yep, it was a pretty clever move too.

Remember that time when…