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business Retail sustainability

H&M enlists Lyft for convenient fashion recycling

H&M has partnered with ride-hailing service Lyft to make it more convenient for New Yorkers to donate unwanted clothing through its Garment Collecting program. From January 22-27, the first 5,000 customers to order a Lyft using a special discount code, HMRECYCLES, will be able to grab a free ride to their nearest H&M store.

“H&M is thrilled to partner with Lyft in a joint effort to give garments a second life through H&M’s Garment Collecting program,” said Martino Pessina, president of H&M North America. “Sustainability is a part of everything we do, and we are excited this initiative will allow more New Yorkers to both learn about and get involved in the program.”

The partnership will enable both brands further drive their respective sustainability goals.

In 2018, Lyft committed to full carbon neutrality and 100% renewable energy by offsetting the carbon emission from all its rides – meaning every ride in NYC is now carbon-neutral. The service has also partnered with cities and public transit agencies across the US to launch bike and scooter schemes.

H&M, on the other hand, has been developing tools and services that aim to help the fashion industry – and its consumers – be more accountable for their actions. The Garment Collection program, which launched in 2013, has so far collected over 163m pounds of textiles globally. In order to incentivize consumers to come into their stores and donate clothing, it offers a 15% discount for future purchases.

Last year, TheCurrent Daily spoke to Anna Gedda, head of sustainability at the H&M Group, on the Innovators podcast about the company’s ambitious goals to become 100% circular by 2030.

How are you thinking about sustainability? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners for your sustainability strategy. TheCurrent Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.


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business Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce film product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Topshop buzz score drops, advanced analytics for apparel, analyzing the streetwear bubble

The streetwear bubble
The streetwear bubble

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Topshop “Buzz Score” drops after Green allegations [The Industry]
  • Geek meets chic: Four actions to jump-start advanced analytics in apparel [McKinsey]
  • Is the streetwear bubble about to burst? [Highsnobiety]
  • How open-source innovation may transform fashion [BoF]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Menswear retailer Jacamo launches voice shopping [Drapers]
  • Tencent is launching its own version of Snap Spectacles [TechCrunch]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Plastic waste elimination pledge by 2025 attracts more big firms [BBC]
  • Is fashion’s eco-consciousness more than a label yet? [BoF]
  • These gorgeous colors come from dye made by bacteria, not chemicals [FastCompany]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • If we built the retail model from scratch, what would it be? [BoF]
  • Goop opens first permanent store in New York City [Glossy]
  • Singapore’s frictionless grocery store and dining concept [LS:N Global]
  • Digging into drop culture: Evolving a roaring retail ritual [Forbes]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Dior aims to lure new audiences with digital influencer Noonouri [Vrroom.buzz]
  • Barbour Christmas campaign celebrates 40 years of iconic festive film [The Scotsman]
  • H&M launches holiday 2018 campaign starring Aubrey Plaza [Highsnobiety]
  • Designing people’s Instagram Stories is now a million-dollar business [FastCompany]
PRODUCT
BUSINESS
  • Revolve’s blend of data and fashion supports case for IPO [WWD]
CULTURE
  • Why voting is in fashion [New York Times]
  • How Rihanna’s Savage x Fenty is changing the lingerie game [Vogue]
  • What can luxury brands learn from Gucci about millennials? [Forbes]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Retail

Ba&sh’s new NY store offers free clothing rentals

Ba&sh in New York City

French label Ba&sh’s new store in New York allows shoppers to borrow the brand’s clothes at no cost, as long as they are returned after the weekend.

The 1,700-square-foot space, located in Soho, aims to act as a “dream closet” and position the brand as a friend the customer can borrow clothes from whenever they have a special event. Customers borrowing clothes can only do so every Friday between 5-7pm, and they must be returned by Monday at 7pm.

The opening is part of a bigger expansion strategy from the company in the North American market, as well as a customer engagement push that includes a series of permanent in-store activities.

“It’s an experiential store, the first one designed to thoughtfully elevate the existing experience to a new level. The store was a natural evolution. Our brand has always been rooted in special relationships,” said global CEO, Pierre-Arnaud Grenade, to WWD.

The brand, which currently operates 200 stores globally but only five in the US, hopes the new space also works for customer awareness and acquisition – by making clothes available to rent free of charge, it allows customers to discover the brand more easily. For this launch, a pop-up area will promote other French brands who have no US presence, such as jewelry label Atelier Paulin and luxury candlemaker Baobab.

The space will also offer a series of events that encourage customers to bring a friend, such as monthly supper clubs, weekly French lessons (of which 75% of the cost is subsidized by the brand), weekly complimentary French breakfast and a children’s play area so customers can shop in peace.

As part of the strategy, the brand’s e-commerce team has also relocated to the city. Currently, 20% of the brand’s US sales are completed online, which is higher than the rest of the world.

The moves comes as consumers increasingly look to the notion of the sharing economy – borrowing or renting items rather than having ownership of them. It’s through this that businesses including Rent the Runway have grown in relevancy in today’s market. One  fifth of millennials reportedly now say they would consider renting clothing, according to Hammerson and Verdict.

How are you thinking about retail innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Editor's pick Retail

Depop opens physical store that teaches community how to sell

Depop in NYC
Depop in NYC

Depop has opened a physical outpost in NYC that aims to strengthen its connection to the community by offering advice on how to sell.

The store features a photo studio where sellers, or the marketplace app’s trained professionals, can photograph their items against clean backgrounds, as well as receive hands-on advice on how to brand an online store and how to navigate the postal system.

“The whole purpose of the space is to strengthen our connection with our community, and to experience Depop in real life,” said Maria Raga, Depop’s CEO, to i-D magazine. “Different styles, different subcultures, and introducing different designers in a new light is really important to us. It’s fun for our community too because they get to be inspired by the possibilities of what they can do with their Depop shops.”

To reinforce that purpose, the store is not fully stocked, but rather currently carrying a curated selection dedicated to NYC called Depop Loves New York.

At the moment, shoppers can find items by the likes of seller Venus X, who recently closed a vintage store in the city, and Luke Fracher, who provides a selection of rare shirts from local sports teams like the Yankees and the Mets, by Fracher. Meanwhile NYC-based designer Sandy Liang reworked vintage pieces, while Queens-based artist Slumpy Kev painted on vintage Levi’s and Dickies garments.

Depop in NYC
Depop in NYC

“Our community is just a little sponge of very thirsty entrepreneurs, and creative entrepreneurs at that,” continues Raga. “I think it’s just getting that first taste of what it is to make your own wealth, while having fun and creating your own brand.”

This is Depop’s second physical outpost, with the first one opening in Los Angeles in March. The store holds a similar purpose to its newest iteration, and is also inviting top users to host their own pop-ups within the space.

Depop’s foray into brick-and-mortar, as well as its core purpose of giving its community the tools and exposure to succeed, serve to further emphasise how brands can enable the young shopper’s behaviour of having a ‘side hustle’, and increasingly seeing themselves as entrepreneurs.

Stores with little merchandise but a loud message are also an effective marketing strategy for making use of physical spaces that don’t need to sell, but act as gateways to online experiences. Last year,  Nordstrom launched its Local concept  tapping into service and convenience over merchandise per square foot.

How are you thinking about retail innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Campaigns Editor's pick Retail

Coach pop-up celebrates self-discovery with NY fairground experience

“Life Coach” pop-up

Coach’s newest pop-up, Life Coach, celebrates the label’s roots in New York City with a series of immersive experiences that aims to “heighten your senses, stimulate your soul and wake up all the feels”.

The activation, which is running from June 12 through to June 17 in the Soho neighbourhood in NYC, which is where the brand was founded in 1941, invites guests to participate in tarot card readings, drawing, and playing carnival games.

Visitors enter the space via a neon storefront filled with psychic symbols and Coach visuals. Upon first entering the space visitors are asked to check in, and when reaching the first room, they are met with an entirely blank canvas on which they are encouraged to draw on.

The next room represents a typical Coney Island-type of fairground scene, including old-fashioned arcade games and photo props, as well as a boardwalk made from pieces salvaged from Coney Island after Hurricane Sandy.

In the third and final room, visitors can walk through a dark forest where they can find white tents that house tarot card readers.

Speaking to the New York Times, Carlos Becil, Coach’s chief marketing officer, said of the concept: “Whether you call it mindfulness, spirituality or self-help, seeking answers is the new pop culture.”

Activities that help consumers through their self-discovery include free sessions with mystics including tarot card readers Hoodwitch and astrologists Astrotwins. The event, which has no Coach product in sight, will keep its concept of self-discovery and elusiveness by introducing surprise guests and events throughout its programming until the pop-up’s last day.

The entire initiative ties to a broader theme we’re seeing in consumer retail, whereby the experience economy is evolving into the transformation economy – a state that is about driving self improvement and enhancement for consumers through brand activities, rather than mere moments meant to encourage dwell time or social sharing.

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Campaigns Editor's pick Retail

Tiffany & Co. dips NYC in its iconic shade of blue with experiential campaign

Tiffany & Co
Tiffany & Co

To celebrate Paper Flowers, the first jewelry collection under new chief artistic officer Reed Krakoff, Tiffany & Co is color-dipping a variety of New York City icons in its well-recognized “robin’s-egg blue“.

For both fans and unsuspecting city dwellers, Krakoff hopes this campaign will offer a sense of “unexpected discovery and joy”.

Between May 1-4 passersby walking along Prince Street up to Seventh Avenue will be able to glimpse the paper flowers that have been hand-crafted by Tiffany’s creative team, or see one of the many yellow cabs now dipped in the iconic shade. While this takes care of spaces at street-level, Krakoff also made sure to lighten-up the commute for anyone travelling on the subway by immersing select staircases and MetroCards in the uplifting color.

Krakoff told Vogue that when creating the concept of the city-wide installation, he was inspired by what Audrey Hepburn’s character embodied in Breakfast at Tiffany’s: “The juxtaposition of wearing a floor length gown and a tiara while holding a paper bag with coffee and a pastry,” he said. “The idea that luxury doesn’t have to be formal.”

To make it easier for anyone eager to seek out the colorful makeovers, Tiffany has provided a custom Google map that points to the precise locations.

Tiffany & Co
Tiffany & Co

This is not the first time the newly-appointed creative has made headlines with his innovative engagement strategy. In November 2017, Krakoff opened the very first Tiffany café, located on the fourth floor of its Fifth Avenue flagship. Dedicated entirely to the cult Tiffany blue as well, it enables customers to experience the brand in a whole new way; completely engrossing them in the Tiffany lifestyle.

With retail stores increasingly struggling to persuade shoppers to visit their stores, the experiential approach ensures that Tiffany is fully in control of the customer experience. By leveraging the iconic shade of blue that has been adorning the packaging and marketing materials from its inception, Tiffany ensures that customers will instantly draw the connection between the color and the unique heritage of its brand.

UPDATE: As part of the launch, the brand also debuted a short film starring its campaign spokesperson, actress Elle Fanning, to the soundtrack of a remixed version of ‘Moon River’. The short shows Fanning walking and dancing the streets of New York, paying homage to Audrey Hepburn’s famous scene in Breakfast at Tiffany’s where the character sings the now iconic track.

The 2018 version receives a rap interlude by A$AP Ferg and sees Fanning donning a hoodie while showcasing Tiffany & Co. jewellery, a creative direction that is undoubtedly aiming to give the brand a fresher look while presenting it to a younger audience. The remixed track can now also be found separately in Spotify.