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e-commerce Editor's pick Retail sustainability

3 ways brands are experimenting with the resale market

From partnering with resale websites to facilitating consignment selling, brands are increasingly exploring ways to be more involved with their products as they continue through their lifecycles.

Part exercise in brand control and part push for more sustainable consumer habits, the move is of course also an enormous opportunity for extended revenue streams.

The secondhand market is projected to double in value over the next five years, skyrocketing from $24bn to $51bn, according to a report from resale site, thredUP.

We’re also seeing heavy investment in the resale space as a result. Foot Locker just put in $100m into GOAT, while Farfetch recently acquired Stadium Goods for $250 million. There’s also a round of funding coming up for sneaker marketplace StockX, which will turn the company into the first sneaker reseller valued at $1bn, according to Recode.

Here are three ways brands are otherwise experimenting with and promoting the resale market:

1. PARTNERING WITH RESALE WEBSITES

Starting this April, & Other Stories started selling pre-owned garments. The project was created in partnership with second-hand platform Sellpy, which manages and operates its sales. When clicking on the new “pre-loved” section on the & Other Stories’ website, clients are redirected to sellpy.se. For now, the service is only available in Sweden.

“We’re exploring different ideas on how our long-lasting designs can find their way to new owners. With that in mind, we decided to do a small second-hand test project with Sellpy,” explained Sanna Lindberg, managing director of & Other Stories.

Stella McCartney made history last year as the first luxury brand to promote the consignment of its products on The RealReal. Anyone selling Stella McCartney products on the platform receives a $100 voucher valid at any of the brand’s stores or via its website.

2. DRIVING RESALE SELLING AND BUYING THROUGH STORES

Neiman Marcus recently invested in Fashionphile, a high-end consignment boutique. It has plans to have Fashionphile drop-off locations inside select stores, allowing shoppers to get paid right away for their pre-owned items. For now, Fashionphile is offering an increased buyout price for those who opt to receive payment as a credit at Neiman Marcus.

Meanwhile, just last month, Galeries Lafayette introduced a second-hand fashion platform called Le Good Dressing, which combines online shopping with an in-store experience. Vendors on the site sell products and then drop them off in the store, where buyers can come in to get their purchases – with no commission charged.  Sellers also receive a voucher that can be redeemed at any Galeries Lafayette store or its online shop. Attracting both buyers and sellers into the store, this initiative translates into a host of new sales opportunities.

Added to the list is the new Levi’s flagship in New York City’s Times Square, which has a section dedicated to selling pre-owned garments. Here, it’s possible to find not only newer styles, but also refurbished items from past decades, going as far back as the 1930s and 1940s.

3. FACILITATING THE CONSIGNMENT ITSELF

West coast brand, Reformation, is the first brand to partner with resale website thredUp on a project called UPcycle. When customers shop on the Reformation website throughout May 2019, they all automatically receive an UPcycle kit in their orders. These kits enable customers to shop the clothes they want to consign to thredUP, taking away the hassle of sorting out the inventory to do so.

But that’s not all, when a customer decides to consign any product from any brand via thredUp, they also have the option to get paid with a gift card for Reformation. This is a way to create more circularity, while also promoting Reformation’s brand. ThredUp expects to establish similar partnerships with 10 more companies this year.

How are you thinking about retail innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
business digital snippets Retail sustainability

ICYMI: Allbirds imposes carbon tax on itself, what Fortnite means for fashion, luxury pledges to rebuild Notre Dame

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Allbirds imposed a carbon tax on itself–and your brand should, too [Fast Company]
  • What Fortnite could mean for fashion [Sourcing Journal]
  • Louis Vuitton and Gucci owners pledge more than $300 million to rebuild Notre Dame after fire [CNBC]
  • London retailers hit out at protesters [Drapers]
  • Can recycling fix fashion’s landfill problem? [BoF]
TECHNOLOGY
  • The high-tech new standard for sampling [Drapers]
  • As supply chains get tech savvy, is cybersecurity keeping pace? [Supply Chain Dive]
  • Some apps use design to trick you into sharing data. A new bill would make that illegal. [Vox]
  • We built an ‘unbelievable’ (but Legal) facial recognition machine [NYT]
  • River Island adds AI tech, claiming it can boost sales by 10% [Fashion Network]
  • H&M harnesses AI to test online tailoring feature [Fashion United]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • How to make sustainable fashion people will actually buy [BoF]
  • Clouds on the horizon: What climate change means for retail [Retail Dive]
  • Everlane’s founder vowed to remove all new plastic from the brand’s supply chain by 2021. Now he has to figure out how [Fast Company]
  • Brioni launches ‘zero-mileage’ sustainable menswear capsule collection [Fashion Network]
  • This new technical fabric replaces polyester with banana plants [Fast Company]
  • How green is your lipstick: beauty brands and the fight against plastic waste [The Guardian]
  • PrettyLittleThing partners with recycling app [Drapers]
  • With millennials in mind, outdoor retailer REI doubles down on rentals and used gear sales [Forbes]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Neiman Marcus invests in luxury reseller Fashionphile, proving power of re-commerce and millennials [Forbes]
  • Offering shoppers new experiences isn’t helping: Malls hit with store closure tsunami, falling traffic [CNBC]
  • The complex link between retail and packaging [Retail Dive]
  • 4 reasons why luxury rentals could be a hit with Chinese millennials [Jing Daily]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Welcome to the new era of high fashion and video game collaborations: Inside Moschino and The Sims partnership [Fortune]
  • More than 100 brands collaborated with Game of Thrones. Here are the best stunts [AdWeek]
PRODUCT
  • Top jewellery CEOs say lab-grown diamonds are fashion, not luxury [Fashion Network]
BUSINESS
  • Valentino revenue growth slowed in 2018 [BoF]
  • Why fashion and beauty brands should take note of Pinterest’s IPO [Vogue Business]
  • Kering shares slide as Gucci’s growth slows [BoF]
CULTURE
  • Gen Z crave a world without borders, boundaries and binaries [WWD]
  • With a rapidly growing market, the trans-masculine community Is forging its own path in fashion [Fashionista]
  • Champion accidentally hit the fashion jackpot [Houston Chronicle]
  • China’s sharing economy now includes make-up, but hygiene doubts are hard to brush off [SCMP]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
business Campaigns digital snippets product Retail sustainability technology

ICYMI: Tom Ford for CFDA, Neiman Marcus megastore, Louis Vuitton pulls Michael Jackson pieces

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Tom Ford tapped to head CFDA [WWD]
  • Neiman Marcus blends retail and tech at Hudson Yards megastore [TheCurrentDaily]
  • Louis Vuitton pulls Michael Jackson-themed items from collection [Reuters]
  • Burberry wants to go plastic-free by 2025 [WWD]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Lush demos visual search app and fresh ‘digital packaging’ at SXSW [Retail Dive]
  • Google lets YouTube creators add AR selfies to Stories [Mobile Marketer]
  • Google rolls out smart targeting for in-game ads [Mobile Marketer]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • United Nations launches Alliance for Sustainable Fashion in Nairobi [Fashion Network]
  • How big retailers are selling sustainability [BoF]
  • Ikea turns recycled furniture into adorable homes for wildlife [Fast Company]
  • Stella McCartney, Christopher Raeburn among winners of inaugural CO10 Sustainability Award [WWD]
  • Primark launches its first range of 100% sustainable cotton jeans [The Industry]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Rent the Runway and West Elm launch data-informed home rental collection [TheCurrentDaily]
  • Philadelphia just banned cashless stores. Will other cities follow? [Vox]
  • American Eagle targets Gen Z with sneaker resale pop-up [TheCurrentDaily]
  • Inspiration: Balenciaga’s new Sloane Street “warehouse” [The Industry]
PRODUCT
  • Hermès to launch beauty range in 2020 [Fashion Network]
  • CBD fragrance is here — and it can be absorbed through the skin [WWD]
  • Fashion brands are making stylish clothes for dogs, and millennials are spending plenty of money on them [Fashionista]
  • Supergoop unveils SPF eye shadow [WWD]
BUSINESS
  • Adidas Q4 net profit jumps 29% [WWD]
  • Shoes of Prey goes into voluntary administration [Fashion Network]
  • Furla’s turnover exceeds 500 million euros [Fashion United]
  • Zalando to end private business zLabels [Retail Gazette]
  • JD Sports to buy smaller rival Footasylum [BoF]
  • Prada shares tumble as China slowdown hits profits [BoF]
  • Here’s how the trade war could lead to a boom in counterfeit goods [CNBC]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • The beauty of a billboard in the age of Instagram [The Fashion Law]
  • Will success spoil Diet Prada? [BoF]
  • Increasingly experimental Sephora introduces credit card program [WWD]
  • Benefit Cosmetics launches first voice-led campaign in the UK [Internet Retailing]
CULTURE
  • Evolution of man: the rise and rise of the male wellness sector [The Guardian]
  • Sephora ends beauty deal with vlogger after college admissions scandal [AdAge]
  • Exploring the politics of beauty in the world of VR and gaming [Dazed]
  • Why urban millennials love Uniqlo [The Atlantic]
  • Why do blunders like the Gucci blackface debacle still happen? [Quartz]
  • ‘Project Runway’s return to Bravo was diverse, relevant and touching [Fashionista]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
Editor's pick Retail

Neiman Marcus blends retail and tech at Hudson Yards megastore

Department store Neiman Marcus is claiming a stake of the $25bn Hudson Yards development opening in lower Manhattan in NYC this week with a megastore that merges traditional and omnichannel retail.

The space, which takes up five out of seven floors of the retail complex, is the retailer’s latest play at engaging with a new luxury consumer that is not only seeking products, but experiences and education alongside.

On the lower floor, for example, the retailer is hosting a kitchen for live demonstrations, while Neiman Marcus Live is a space on the middle floor that can hold up to 100 people for events like talks and Q&As with fashion designers and industry pioneers. The store also features a bar, named Stanley, which overlooks the Thomas Heatherwick-designed Vessel structure, a larger-than-life center piece for the Hudson Yards complex.

Technology is being blended into the space in order to give the luxury customer a one-to-one, tailored interaction with sales staff.

The Current Global’s CTO, Scott Emmons, who is the former head of the Neiman Marcus iLab, and was responsible for the technology execution in the new store before his departure, said: “We applied creative approaches and partnerships so that the consumer-facing technology was both useful to the shopper, and fit naturally into a very luxurious retail environment.”

A smart fitting room at Neiman Marcus

This includes a smart fitting room where customers can ‘check in’ upon entering, which will then act as a communication tool between shopper and sales associate. The customer can request new items, different sizing and even signal they are ready to check out through a personal screen, which is then communicated to the associate’s mobile POS system.

The fitting room experience was designed to easily be updated with new capabilities in the future, such as self-checkout or recommendation technologies, as well as enhance the ever-important role of the associate.

“Technology in this instance, is being used to not only deliver an optimal customer experience but act as a digital exoskeleton to supercharge the capabilities of the sales associates,” Emmons added.

It’s for this reason he believes this store is an example of what retail needs to look like in the future. “New York is one of the toughest places in the world to be a retailer and stand out from very capable competitors. Technology is not the only answer but when combined with the visual aspects, the right merchandise, experiential aspects and so forth, it can put you over the top.”

“This is how we think about things at the Current Global – removing technology from its vacuum and into the wider context of creative innovation in order to meet pressing consumer demands. At the end of the day, traditional retail must be weaved together with modern tech to enable customers to be seen and treated like individuals, and not market segments. Technology for the sake of it will never respond to basic human needs of having emotional connections when purchasing luxury.

“At a time when so many department stores are failing, what Neiman Marcus has pulled off is an inspiring example of what luxury retail should be. It’s a combination of great experience, great staffing, great environment and the right tech.”

How are you thinking about retail innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
business Editor's pick Podcast Retail technology

Retailers are holding back real innovation, reveals departing leader of Neiman Marcus iLab

The head of the Neiman Marcus iLab, one of most established retail innovation programs in the world, no longer believes internal teams can deliver the results needed to drive the industry forward.

Incubation units dedicated to innovation through technology are held back by the culture of the legacy organizations in which they have been built, and the cumbersome procurement processes that surround them, Scott Emmons highlights.

Emmons is backing his statement by departing the lab he founded in 2012 to take up a new position as Chief Technology Officer at TheCurrent Global, a consultancy transforming how fashion and retail brands intersect with technology.

“Corporate innovation programs seem to start strong and sharp, but over time, they are devoured and diminished by surrounding day-to-day business processes, making it nearly impossible to maintain momentum. It’s one thing to talk to agility and risk, but when you’re not built for either, measured by cost reductions and operating within a silo, results tend only to be incremental. It’s time for that to change. For fashion and retail brands to succeed, they need to shift from an internally driven culture to one focused on open innovation with the world’s top technology and talent,” says Emmons.

The move marks a new era for retail innovation. Traditional businesses introduced internal innovation teams at a time when digital transformation was the primary goal. Increased competition from nimble digital players, or those willing and able to take risk, resulted in a need for experimentation.

The promise of these incubation units was around driving change from an operations, marketing and corporate culture standpoint in the context of toughening market conditions and ever-increasing consumer expectations. But with the majority of retailers focused on solving and building solutions internally – instantly limiting them on resource and breadth of expertise – successful results have been relatively sporadic.

Neiman Marcus has always been a frontrunner in the retail innovation space, largely thanks to the work Emmons has done. This has included a memory mirror, 4K touch table lookbooks, store associate IOT communicators, intelligent mobile phone charging stations and new fitting room technology.

But Emmons now believes corporate culture and processes are counterproductive to recruiting, onboarding and maintaining relationships with startups or innovative solution providers. He joins TheCurrent Global to focus on that aim alongside founders Liz Bacelar, Chief Executive Officer, and Rachel Arthur, Chief Innovation Officer. Founded in 2017, TheCurrent Global has worked with clients including Gucci, Burberry, Tiffany & Co, Mulberry, Shiseido, Swarovski, LVMH and the British Fashion Council to bring open innovation and actionable insights to fashion and retail brands.

“I am honored to join the team at TheCurrent Global to integrate top technology solutions from around the world into a multitude of retail and brand partners. This methodology is what the industry needs – an agile workforce that can act as an extension of your team,” says Emmons.

Liz Bacelar, CEO, TheCurrent Global, comments: “Real innovation can only happen today by tackling problems in a new way. We all know it is insanity to expect different results using the same approaches. With the help of outside experts, businesses can achieve growth in a new way, with both speed and efficiency. What TheCurrent Global brings is the ability to take the incredible work Scott has done at Neiman Marcus and take it to CEOs who want to lead the innovation conversation. We do that by relying on our industry expertise and access to an ecosystem of thousands of curated startups, technologies and entrepreneurs from around the world.”

UPDATE: Emmons’ story has hit headlines this week, including in WWD, The Business of Fashion, Glossy, Fashion United and more. Before this amazing press coverage, we sat down with him for our Innovators podcast to discuss his reasons for leaving Neiman Marcus, and exactly what he’s going to bring to TheCurrent Global. You can listen to it here or via the links below.

Listen here: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | RSS

Categories
Campaigns product Retail

Nike is dropping a new Air Jordan 1 sneaker everyday this week

Nike's "The Week of The Ones"
Nike’s “The Week of The Ones”

Nike UK will be releasing different iterations of its iconic Air Jordan 1 sneaker everyday this week as part of an event series it is calling “The Week of The Ones”.

The aim is to “celebrate the icon” of the Air Jordan 1 sneaker, which was first released in 1984 and has since cemented its status as “sneaker royalty, forever associated with streetwear, style and His Airness himself”, according to the brand.

The exclusive sneakers are available for European customers, and can only be purchased through the brand’s SNKRS UK app.

Upon opening the app, a GIF on an all-white design of the coveted sneaker will flash up in different colorways to reveal the editions available throughout the week.

The first two styles have already been confirmed at this point, called the “PSG” and “Not For Resale”.

Such a move from Nike comes at a time when we’re seeing an increase in retailers capitalizing on the hype around the streetwear inspired drop-culture. Barneys New York and Neiman Marcus recently embraced limited releases in their respective department stores in June of this year, and the newly opened MatchesFashion.com store in London is investing in refreshing its product assortment every two weeks.

Luxury brands have also been embracing this model, with Burberry as one example introducing monthly-recurring product drops of exclusive merchandise under the supervision of its new creative director Riccardo Tisci.

The phenomenon of streetwear culture and its impact on luxury specifically is analyzed in more depth on an episode of the Innovators podcast by TheCurrent, where we interviewed Ferdinando Verderi, co-founder and creative director of NY-based agency Johannes Leonardo, and the man responsible for much of the work between Adidas and Alexander Wang.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about helping you build innovative integrations and experiences. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology, powered by a network of top startups. Get in touch to learn more.

 

Categories
Retail

Barneys and Neiman Marcus embrace new retail experiences

thedropLA@Barneys
thedropLA@Barneys

The idea that consumers require more than just product to drive them into department stores in the current retail climate, is being heavily backed by the likes of Barneys New York and Neiman Marcus of late.

Both have recently launched experience-led pop-ups, designed to drive customer engagement, create hype via social media and ultimately translate visitors into purchasers.

While the two department stores differ in their approach, the aim for both is clearly driven by their realization that modern consumers require more than one-off events to continuously drive footfall and conversion.

In the spirit of thinking outside the box, Barneys New York has launched a strategy inspired by streetwear’s “drop” culture and how to build hype back into retail. The initiative launched in October 2017, but it has recently matured into a two-day event titled thedropLA@Barneys, where the retailer once again teamed up with media publisher Highsnobiety to offer over 90+ brands and 20+ exclusive partnerships with streetwear-meets-luxury designers, as well as to host designer appearances and immersive installations.

Spread across five floors, the event was attended by 12,000 people and saw a 50% uplift in sales compared to the same weekend in 2017.

Neiman Marcus is similarly translating its new strategy with the “Idea Factory” concept, which launched with a variety of in-store activities that aim to bring customers and creatives together through one-off services such as product personalization and classes. The event is happening over the next two weeks in five stores across the US.

These installations are supposed to only be the beginning for a series of initiatives, with phase two anticipated in September. For the second instalment, the retailer is looking at concepts in epicure, food & beverage, travel, wellness and social consciousness, in a bid to become more culturally relevant, says Ed Burstell, Neiman Marcus’ SVP of product innovation

The new approach shows that ultimately, the future of retail, particularly when it comes to multibrand stores, depends on embracing the values of the younger consumers, as their high spending power can’t be denied, says Jeff Carvalho, managing director of Highsnobiety.

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce product social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Fashion themes from Davos, Bitcoin bubble, social media’s black market

The seven female co-chairs of the 2018 World Economic Forum at Davos
The seven female co-chairs of the 2018 World Economic Forum

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • 4 Davos themes fashion needs to watch [BoF]
  • Beyond the Bitcoin bubble [NY Times]
  • The follower factory: Inside social media’s black market [NY Times]
  • How box logos and the blockchain reveal our anxieties about an uncertain future [Ssense]
TECHNOLOGY
  • I got chipped: a dispatch from the frontier of wearable tech [Fast Company]
  • Sewing a mechanical future [RobotRabbi]
  • Inside the race to create an AI-powered virtual Elton John [Wired]
  • L’Oréal launches 3D AR hair color simulation app [FashionNetwork]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • The world’s most sustainable companies 2018 [Forbes]
  • Napapijri launches new form of digital manufacturing [FashionUnited]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Prada debuts new pop-up retail project in Macau [WWD]
  • Fashion retailers in China go cashier free using facial recognition payment [Jing Daily]
  • How customers decide whether to buy from your website [HBR]
SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Inside Balmain’s digital revolution [BoF]
  • Neiman Marcus looks to associates for social media commerce [Pymnts]
PRODUCT
  • How Nike used algorithms to help design its latest running shoe [Wired]
  • Couture that combines Japanese craftsmanship with the science of space travel [CNN]
BUSINESS
  • Richemont offers €2.7 billion for full control of Yoox Net-a-Porter [BoF]
  • Asos sales soar driven by ‘exceptional’ UK performance [Retail Week]
  • Will Hedi Slimane be a blessing or a curse for Céline? [HighSnobiety]
  • Kering, Stella McCartney in talks to end partnership [BoF]
  • Abercrombie and Fitch might actually be pulling off its comeback [Glossy]
Categories
data e-commerce technology

Four quick highlights from NRF 2018

NRF 2018
NRF 2018

NRF’s Big Show hit New York once again this week with an expo floor covering every form of technology modern retailers need today*, and big topics of conversation pointing to the future of the industry.

From a topline perspective, focus was on everything from personalization through artificial intelligence, to the need for speed, enabling a frictionless experience as well as the increasing demand for invisibility in technology.

Personalization

Artificial intelligence remains one of the hot terms in the industry today – machine learning, computer vision, natural language processing and chatbots were found left, right and center across NRF. Underlying that in terms of the reason it matters, however, was a focus on personalization for customers. Neiman Marcus’ president and CEO, Karen Katz, talked to the challenge of shifting from being a retailer that nails this in store through the human-to-human experience, and now trying to replicate that in the online world. “Online is where the next level is presenting itself for [service-oriented] personalization,” she said.

Speed

Spencer Fung, CEO of Li & Fung, talked to the idea of the industry shifting from being optimized by cost, to finding competitive advantage in speed. As an industry, the time it takes to get from ideas to stores has only extended by virtue of parts of the supply chain located further and further away. “This cost optimization model in a world where consumers are moving 10x faster is no longer valid. You can no longer make decisions today on what will sell in 40-50 weeks time,” he said. The supply chain of the future, underpinned by new technology, is predicated by speed.

Invisibility

While technology is so central to the NRF scene, the discussion for retailers is increasingly around how to make this invisible for consumers. “The most relevant future innovation platforms are ones that consumers don’t see,” said Levi’s brand president James JC Curleigh. He talked to the idea of complete simplicity on the front end, all the while there’s increasing sophistication behind-the-scenes. Intel’s chief innovation officer, Stacey Shulman, agreed with this point, telling us: “Technology should never be at the forefront from a consumer perspective, it just needs to be the helper at the back. It’s what enables sales associates to get back to the customer and back to what’s important.”

Frictionless

In the context of NRF, the word “omnichannel” is an oft-overused one. This year, however, it was the idea of making retail frictionless that was bandied about more predominantly. Neiman Marcus’ Katz talked to this as being one of the organization’s greatest challenges. Calling it frictionless retail is about having greater scope for every touchpoint, she suggested. Nordstrom’s SVP of customer experience, Shea Jensen, meanwhile, told us her focus is on providing convenience; doing things in the context of continuously solving customer problems.

*Want to know which technologies we deemed most relevant from the show floor? Our team of startup scouts combed through the innovations demonstrated, examining and analyzing those of chief importance to retailers and brands today. Get in touch to find out more.

Categories
business data digital snippets e-commerce Startups sustainability technology

What you missed: LVMH e-commerce, Copenhagen Fashion Summit, the role of personalisation

LVMH is launching a new e-commerce site under CDO Ian Rogers
LVMH is launching a new e-commerce site under CDO Ian Rogers

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech industry news over the past week.


TOP STORIES
  • LVMH and the next big digital shopping experience [NY Times]
  • In Copenhagen, gearing up for a circular fashion system [BoF]
  • Surprise surprise, the fashion industry isn’t as sustainable as it should be – report [High Snobiety]
  • The heartbeat of modern marketing: Data activation and personalisation [McKinsey]
  • From farm to finished garment: Blockchain is aiding this fashion collection with transparency [Forbes]
  • How custom footwear retailer Shoes of Prey cut its delivery time to two weeks [Glossy]

BUSINESS
  • Coach confirms acquisition of Kate Spade [The Industry]
  • American Apparel to let shoppers choose US-made clothing [Retail Dive]
  • In global retailing, does the ‘see-now, buy-now’ model really work? [Thomson Reuters]
  • Hudson’s Bay taps debt adviser amid Neiman Marcus bid challenges [Reuters]
  • How clothing brands are embracing transparency to meet the growing demand for sustainable apparel [AdWeek]

MARKETING
  • Tiffany & Co. takes direct aim at Trump in new ad calling for action on climate change [Business Insider]
  • The prioritisation of personalisation [Glossy]
  • What you don’t know about American millennials [BoF]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • It’s more than Amazon: Why retail is in distress now [CNBC]
  • Amid brick-and-mortar travails, a tipping point for Amazon in apparel [NY Times]
  • What China reveals about the future of shopping [BCG]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Jeff Bezos: Artificial intelligence permeates Amazon’s business strategy [Retail Dive]

START-UPS
  • The RealReal is opening a real store in New York [TechCrunch]