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business Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce product Retail sustainability technology

Shopify’s $6.6m sustainability fund, TikTok’s global rise, the new lure of the mall

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Shopify looks to fight climate change, commits $6.6 million to new sustainability fund (BetaKit)
  • The strategy behind TikTok’s global rise (Harvard Business Review)
  • Can rollercoasters and a bunny garden lure shoppers back to the mall? (BoF)
  • Germany unveils Green Button: what you need to know about the worlds first sustainable textile label (Fashion United)
TECHNOLOGY
  • Pentland brands trials AR app (Drapers)
  • How technologies like RFID elevate the customer experience (Fashion United)
  • Luxury retailers are ladling on perks to please ultra-rich clients (Wired)
  • Coca-Cola cans activate animated stories in AR (Mobile Marketer)
  • Entrupy is an app that helps authenticate your grails (Highsnobiety)
  • McDonald’s uses AI for ordering at drive-throughs (BBC News)
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • How designers are trying to make NYFW more sustainable (Nylon)
  • Gucci vies to be even greener (NYT)
  • Stella McCartney pens an urgent letter to the fashion industry (The Times)
  • Biodegradable clothes may fix fashion’s huge waste problem (Wired)
  • Second-hand fashion hits £187m on eBay (Fashion United)
  • Harvey Nichols dips a toe into the circular economy (Vogue Business)
  • H&M announces initiative to increase e-commerce sustainability (Fashion United)
  • Sainsbury vows to halve plastic packaging by 2025 (Retail Gazette)
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
BUSINESS
  • Philip Green’s Topshop & Topman report £505m loss (The Guardian)
  • New York’s Fashion Week revamp: did it work? (BoF)
  • New MD at Net-a-Porter (Drapers)
  • C&A files to begin IPO Process in Brazil (BoF)
  • Q&A with Mark Parker, CEO of Nike (Fast Company)
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • ‘We’re doing an evolution’: Inside Playboy’s extreme makeover (Digiday)
  • In London, is Extinction Rebellion out-marketing fashion? (BoF)
PRODUCT
  • Kim Kardashian’s Skims solutionwear launches online (Fashion United)
  • Duchess of Sussex’s new charity workwear collection (Vogue Business)
CULTURE
  • James Scully calls out ‘distressing’ treatment of models at NYFW (Dazed)
  • Macy’s announces 5-point plan to promote diversity and inclusion (Fashion United)
  • How to prevent your company from cultural appropriation (Forbes)
  • How cancel culture is affecting brands (Digiday)
  • PrettyLittleThing champions diversity at NYFW (Fashion United)
  • CurvyCon proves the future of fashion is fat (Fashionista)
  • M&S presents sunflower lanyards to support customer with disabilities (Retail Gazette)

How are you thinking about innovation? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more.

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business Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce film mobile product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Payless wins with fake luxury store, British MPs grill fast fashion, UN forms sustainability alliance

Payless's fake luxury store Palessi
Payless’s fake luxury store Palessi

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Payless opened a fake luxury store with $600 shoes [Fortune]
  • MPs grill fast fashion bosses on sustainable practices at select committee hearing [The Industry]
  • UN to form alliance to make fashion more sustainable [FashionUnited]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Cambridge Analytica whistleblower joins H&M to lead AI research [TheCurrent Daily]
  • Muji designs “friendly” autonomous shuttle bus for Finland [Dezeen]
  • Smart speakers are everywhere this holiday season, but they’re really a gift for big tech companies [Vox]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Patagonia’s billionaire founder to give away the millions his company saved from Trump’s tax cuts to save the planet [Forbes]
  • Can the ‘broken’ fashion industry be fixed? [BBC]
  • For retailers and brands, sustainability needs good tech [Forbes]
  • Lane Crawford switches to greener shopping bags and packaging [WWD]
  • Next season’s must-have isn’t a handbag, it’s a conscience [i-D]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • How Casper is designing experiential retail moments [TheCurrent Daily]
  • A year in, Marks & Spencer’s virtual assistant has helped drive £2m in sales [Digiday]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • YouTube rolls out merchandise selling function [Drapers]
  • Nike tugs on heartstrings with ‘My Crazy Dream’ IGTV series [Mobile Marketer]
  • Steph Curry tells Under Armour to market his shoes to girls [BoF]
  • Instagram adds ‘close friends’ to let you share stories to a more limited group [The Verge]
  • Benefit to create pink train carriage for last minute brow treatments [Campaign]
PRODUCT
BUSINESS
  • Black Friday took one third of sales from smartphones [FashionUnited]
  • Kering to end Yoox partnership, take control of e-commerce by 2020 [BoF]
  • H&M to shut Cheap Monday [WWD]
  • Condé Nast to combine US and international businesses [BoF]
  • Cash-strapped millennials turn to instalment plans to buy t-shirts and jeans [BoF]
CULTURE
  • Bread & Butter cancelled for 2019 [Drapers]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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business digital snippets e-commerce Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton, Instagram launches IGTV, H&M’s flagships

Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton
Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week, including Virgil Abloh launching for Louis Vuitton.

TOP STORIES
  • Over the rainbow: Virgil Abloh makes historic Louis Vuitton debut [BrandChannel]
  • Instagram celebrates its 1 billion user mark with launch of YouTube rival IGTV [TheDrum]
  • How H&M is rethinking its flagships [BoF]
  • 3 ways personalization can save brands from the retail graveyard [VentureBeat]
TECHNOLOGY
  • This AI program could beat you in an argument – but it doesn’t know what it’s saying [TechnologyReview]
  • Marks & Spencer partners with Microsoft on artificial intelligence initiative [WWD]
  • Performance-based marketing gets blockchain makeover [WWD]
  • You too can be a “Westworld” AI with this new Alexa game [FastCompany]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • Asos to ban silk, cashmere and mohair from its website [BBC]
  • Stella McCartney unveils sustainable shop with ‘cleanest air’ in London [Independent]
  • MPs launch inquiry into the sustainability of the fashion industry [TheIndustry]
  • How Parley for the Oceans became fashion’s go-to environmental non-profit [Fashionista]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • 22 experiential stores NYC has to offer [RetailDive]
  • M&S should be “looking seriously” at Amazon tie-up says former digital boss [Retail Gazette]
  • IRL stores are doing it for the ’Gram [Racked]
  • How Depop is catering to Gen Z and millennials to get an edge over resale competitors [Glossy]
  • Farfetch’s Black and White program shows slow growth [Glossy]
  • Retailers, malls staving off Amazon with help from OneMarket [WWD]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • YouTube hires Derek Blasberg to head fashion partnerships [TheCut]
  • Aerie rapidly gaining market share off social media and ‘more authentic’ women [CNBC]
BUSINESS
  • Chanel publishes annual results for first time in 108 years [NY Times]
  • Amidst consolidation wave, Acne Studios could fetch €500m [BoF]
  • Kering to sell Christopher Kane back to designer [BoF]
  • Google to invest $550 million in China e-commerce giant JD.com [Reuters]
Categories
Editor's pick sustainability

Global fashion brand transparency is on the rise, says new industry report

Fashion Revolution
Fashion Revolution

Adidas and Reebok are leading the way towards greater transparency among major corporate players, according to a new report from sustainable non-profit organization, Fashion Revolution.

Research released in the 2018 Fashion Transparency Index shows improvement across the industry, with the 100 brands reviewed showing an overall increase of 5% in their transparency levels.

The study reviews and ranks major global brands and retailers according to their social and environmental policies, practices and impacts. The top 10 brands for transparency in 2018 also include Puma, H&M, Esprit, Banana Republic, Gap, Old Navy, C&A and Marks & Spencer.

On the fifth anniversary of the Rana Plaza building collapse in Bangladesh, Fashion Revolution highlights the importance for brands to be fair and transparent, particularly when it comes to impact on the lives of workers in the supply chain and on the environment.

The non-profit is also holding a weeklong series of events with designers around the world, sharing their ideas, processes and best practice when it comes to transparency. Designers taking part include Stella McCartney, Phoebe English, Christopher Raeburn and Vivienne Westwood with aims of engaging the consumer further in the conversation of who makes their clothes.

Fashion Revolution’s global operations director and founder Carry Somers said: “Over the last five years, millions of consumers have demanded a fairer, safer, cleaner industry. It’s working. We can see that brands are listening and the industry is starting to change.

“We’re calling upon the global fashion industry to turn its commitment to responsible sourcing into effective action this Fashion Revolution Week. Too many people working in the fashion industry, mostly women, are still underpaid, unsafe and mistreated. It’s time for change”.

In a plea to promote the conversation around supply chain transparency on a wider scale, Fashion Revolution has also launched its manifesto, laying out action points they believe will achieve a cleaner and safer fashion industry. Beyond the actionable steps, the company is also calling on consumers in general to spread the word via shareable social media assets and additional reading material.

For more content on brands striving to achieve a more sustainable supply chain, see TheCurrent Daily’s Sustainability category, which includes innovations by winners of this year’s Index such as Stella McCartney’s mushroom leather handbag and adidas’ pledge to use only recycled ocean plastics by 2020.

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Editor's pick film social media

M&S turns to Paddington Bear for a fully integrated Christmas campaign

Marks & Spencer's 'Paddington and the Christmas Visitor' campaign
Marks & Spencer’s ‘Paddington and the Christmas Visitor’ campaign

Marks & Spencer has launched a Paddington Bear-themed Christmas campaign in an attempt to reach a broader family audience this holiday season.

The ad, which ties to the launch of the Paddington 2 film, tells the tale of Paddington Bear waking from dreams of his favourite marmalade, to the sound of a burglar in his room. Mistaking the red-clad thief for Santa Claus, he inadvertently saves Christmas by re-delivering the stolen presents.

The 90-second spot by Grey London was made to appeal to the whole family instead of the usual target of “Mrs M&S”, who was the focus for 2016’s Mrs Claus campaign. It aims to make a more emotional connection with viewers than in previous years. As the lead characters watch a family opening their presents, for instance, the thief tears up, before being given a marmalade sandwich by the ever-generous Paddington.

“We’d been talking about using our family credentials to leverage growth for a while. We loved the notion of two major British icons coming together and Paddington was the ultimate family character,” Rob Weston, head of marketing at M&S, told The Drum.

Given Paddington is recognised as an iconic British character, continuity in his character was critical for the campaign, according to Vicki Maguire, chief creative officer of Grey London. Simon Fanaby, who co-wrote Paddington 2, wrote the ad with the Grey London team, and the same actor who voices him in the films, voiced the bear for M&S. The ad was directed by Daniel Kleinman, who is known for the James Bond title sequences. The whole process took over four months, with every care taken to ensure Paddington was kept in character.


In a broader sense, the campaign ties into Marks & Spencer’s “Spend it Well” tagline launched in May, which encourages shoppers to focus on the people and experiences that really matter. This line is accompanied by the hashtag #lovethebear for the season, which is a connection to the multimedia fluency of the campaign and the fact Weston calls this M&S’s “most joined up campaign ever”.

The spot itself was debuted on social media, but will also live on TV and in cinemas ahead of every screening of Paddington 2. There are also various free screenings of the film for M&S’s Sparks loyalty members.

The concept also extends to a much wider integrated campaign however. Paddington Bear will appear in store as the focus of the retailer’s window displays and feature in 90 themed products, including toys, on pyjamas and in the marmalade in M&S Foodhalls. The spirit of the campaign will further come to life in-store as designated ‘moment makers’ deliver random acts of kindness to customers.

This is also the company’s most personalised campaign, with numerous stores containing “personalisation stations” this Christmas, where shoppers can personalise gifts such as baubles or t-shirts for friends and family.

Adding to the interactive experience, the ad has been made into a £3 children’s book that will see all profits donated to the NSPCC.

Online, there is also an interview with Paddington Bear on the retailer’s Style & Living hub, alongside downloadable marmalade recipes.

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media technology

What you missed: personalised retail, AR in Covent Garden, what went wrong for Nasty Gal

augmented reality
Augmented reality in Covent Garden

As we move ever closer to the end of the year, there are lots of forward-looking stories coming out, speculating around what the future of the industry might look like. Perhaps unsurprisingly, personalisation and machine learning are popping up time and again. A must-read this week is the perspective from Benedict Evans on what sensors in cameras everywhere means for data, retail, fashion trends and more.

Also worth taking a look at is the augmented reality that’s taken over Covent Garden, how adidas is taking inspiration from Uber in its latest m-commerce app, and insights on the rise and fall of both Nasty Gal and Karmaloop.

Don’t forget our Snapchat Masterclass takes place in London tomorrow (November 22) – just three tickets left for anyone looking to take advantage of our last minute 20% off offer using code “community”.


TOP STORIES
  • Sir Stuart Rose, chairman of Dressipi: The next revolution in retail is data-based, personalised services, and the UK is at the vanguard [City AM]
  • ForerunnerVC on tailoring investments to the new reality of retail [Medium]
  • Covent Garden becomes world’s first augmented reality shopping destination [The Industry]
  • How Adidas’ m-commerce app takes inspiration from Uber to go beyond influencers [The Drum]
  • Benedict Evans on cameras, e-commerce and machine learning [Benedict Evans]

BUSINESS
  • Nasty Gal: What went wrong? [BoF]
  • What the hell happened to Karmaloop? The rise and record-breaking fall of the pioneering e-commerce clothing site [Complex]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • What WeChat teaches about the future of social commerce [AdAge]
  • How 5 brands are testing Instagram’s new shopping feature [Glossy]
  • 6 examples of how marketers are using Snap Inc’s Spectacles [AdWeek]
  • Snapchat parent files for $25 billion IPO [WSJ]

RETAIL
  • WAH Nails to open “salon of the future” in Soho [The Industry]
  • How predictive AI will change shopping [HBR]
  • The Marks & Spencer brand needs an experiential makeover to win back consumers [The Drum]
  • How luxury retailers are navigating Black Friday [Glossy]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Apple considers wearables expansion with digital glasses [Bloomberg]
  • Reebok brings jobs to America, along with 3D printing innovation [BrandChannel]
  • Virtual reality takes fans inside the world of watches [NY Times]
  • 11 exciting new materials designers should watch [Co.Design]

UPCOMING EVENTS
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Editor's pick film social media

M&S wins Christmas with message of festive female power

Marks & Spencer's Mrs Claus in its Christmas with Love campaign
Marks & Spencer’s Mrs Claus in its Christmas with Love campaign

Move over John Lewis, Marks & Spencer may just have beaten you to the title of best Christmas campaign in UK retail this year.

“Christmas with Love” is not only a heartwarming festive tale, but a message of female empowerment at a time of political dismay coming out of the recent US elections. In an anti-Trump statement, its heroine is none other than Mrs Claus herself.

A feminist declaration, it sees Oscar-nominated actress Janet McTeer, sneaking off on her own secret mission during Christmas Eve night, while Santa is busy away on his sleigh. Taking several cues from James Bond – snowmobile, underground transport hub, helicopter ride and more – Mrs Claus arrives at the home of a little boy to make his Christmas wish come true.

Unlike her husband, she skips all the difficult bits, like sliding down the chimney, and instead acts the ultimate logical superhero by striding purposefully the front door. It’s bold, modern and completely kickass, which supports much of the sentiment about it across social media.

The three-minute tale was created by Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R, and directed by Tom Hooper, of The King’s Speech, Elizabeth I and Les Miserables fame. It’s an ambitious piece of cinematic storytelling, as others like Burberry have strived for this season.

Patrick Bousquet-Chavanne, executive director of customer, marketing and M&S.com, said: “Our ‘Christmas with Love’ campaign is a brand new approach for M&S this year, one that has been created with our customers and for our customers, with their feedback at the heart of our strategy. Our ambition is for M&S’s customers across the nation to experience something special this festive season.”

It launches during a challenging time for the retailer, after it announced the closure of 60 stores and a fall in pretax profit of 88% during the first six months of this financial year. Never before has there been such a need for it to turn to fulfilling what its customers really want.

“Mrs Claus is the result of thousands of conversations that we had with our customers to understand what they want from M&S – which is warmth, empathy and a touch of humour presented in a modern and contemporary way. She epitomises the huge efforts our customers put in to making the festive season special and represents the love and togetherness that customers want to feel and see in abundance at Christmas,” Bousquet-Chavanne added.

The ad has already been watched over 4 million times on YouTube. It is supported online by a wealth of web content and fun social messaging (as per the below) backed by Mrs Claus with the #LoveMrsClaus hashtag. All of them continue in her note of female empowerment, even the replies being sent to individual users commenting on the ad. She will also appear in a spot giving style tips to TV presenter Dawn O’Porter and Christmas decoration suggestions to Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer.

The campaign comes of course hot on the heels of the US election and presumably a hope from the retailer that it would support the country’s first female president from afar had Hillary Clinton won. The #imwithher hashtag surrounding the presidential election is undoubtedly a great fit with this same message.

The concept of feminist marketing has been a big focus from brands across the board in recent years, including from others such as H&M and Netflix this autumn. John Lewis also nodded to the results of the US election, as well as Brexit, with a quote from Craig Inglis, customer director, that read: “2016 has certainly been quite a year, so we hope our advert will make people smile.”
It does that too, but for the women out there, M&S manages to go that one step further and gently remind us that hope is not completely lost, after all.

Categories
data film

Which UK Christmas ad really grabbed us? You might be surprised

Marksandspencer

Christmas ads used to be all about selling product. Brands and retailers would dust off the Rat Pack Christmas album, add in some sparkly frocks and set the scene at a dinner party, office party or some other kind of party and there it was. Today though, those Christmas ads are spectaculars that have to build brand awareness, do some social/environmental good and set social media buzzing.

And they have to be emotionally engaging. So I was particularly interested in ICM Unlimited’s webcam survey that tracked consumer reaction to the ads from the UK’s big high street retailers.

They used webcams as part of a survey to capture emotions on faces during a screening of six festive ads. ICM Unlimited found that The Art of Christmas from M&S came top, just beating Sainsbury’s Mog ad as the most emotionally engaging ad. M&S was higher up the emotional engagement scale than any of the other ads tested using ‘facial coding’ and also beat Tesco, John Lewis, Asda and Boots.

ICM Unlimited and CrowdEmotion rated six ads based on a score for happiness, surprise, puzzlement, disgust, fear and sadness. Emotional engagement for the ads was compared against explicit appreciation – did audiences say that they enjoyed the ad? Based on the results, retailers fell into in one of four categories: Love It, Hate It, Needs Work or Guilty Pleasures.

Tom Wormald, director at ICM Unlimited, said: “In surveys, people claim they don’t respond to – or are not influenced by – TV advertising. But using a webcam we can prove we go on an emotional rollercoaster when watching commercials, meaning the ads are influencing our attitudes and behaviours in ways we often don’t even realise.

“The M&S ad sat firmly in our ‘Guilty Pleasures’ category because although people claimed not to like it, the emotional response shows that it brings a lot of ‘happiness’. Sainsbury’s triggered a positive ‘puzzlement’ response driven by curiosity about the storyline. A fast-paced but disjointed narrative from Boots registered a sense of ‘fear’ – it made people feel uncertain. We even detected a sense of ‘disgust’ in responses to some ads, possibly because viewers might feel manipulated by some parts of an advert.”

This is what ICM said about each one:

M&S – The Art of Christmas: Winner in ‘emotional engagement’ – happiness everywhere

This came up top as the most emotionally engaging advert, filled with extravagant visuals and using Mark Ronson’s Uptown Funk as the soundtrack. Upbeat and colourful, peppered with images of gift giving, feasting and excitement, this ad closes nostalgically with fleeting images of Morecambe & Wise. The ad really takes off with shots of children waking then jumping excitedly on beds. Here the facial expressions were all about happiness – 133% higher than the norm of the ads tested.

Sainsbury’s – Mog’s Christmas Calamity: Curiosity and the cat make this a favourite

High explicit appreciation and emotional engagement contributed to the success of this ad. Viewers experienced ‘fear’ at the start because when people see cute animals their protective instincts kick in – and that translates into fear of danger. But the ad’s humour quickly produces high scores for ‘happiness’, some 85% above the ad norm when Mog is spun around on a ceiling fan in the kitchen. The Sainsbury’s story created a strong sense of ‘puzzlement’ and curiosity too – scoring 150% higher for these emotions than the John Lewis ad.

Tesco finest Range – Flirt: Puzzlement and disgust

The sight of an awkward young man trying to impress a confident older woman with his tastes in desserts, cheese and wine also brought mixed emotions. There was ‘puzzlement’ about whether the flirty son would be put in his place. The young man’s insistence on seeking the older woman’s attention created a sense of ‘disgust’. But ‘happiness’ peaks when the young man’s mother arrives to put him down by showing her son some boys-sized pyjamas.

John Lewis – Man on The Moon: Experience the full range of emotions

This is the ad everyone wanted to hate (low explicit appreciation scores), but secretly loved (sound emotional engagement scores). Featuring a young girl making contact with the Man on the Moon, the ad is unusual and resulted in higher ‘surprise’ scores (40% more than Sainsbury’s Mog the Cat). It also registered ‘disgust’, with viewers possibly rejecting the ad for its use of feelings of guilt and pathos towards the elderly. Man on the Moon also scored 22% more ‘sadness’ compared to Mog the Cat.

Asda – Because it’s Christmas: Cute Pug dog with antlers hits the high point

Asda’s ad performed poorly on ‘explicit appreciation’ and ‘emotional engagement’. Despite the upbeat soundtrack and visuals, viewers felt the ad lacked a clear narrative. But there were some high points with ‘happiness’ surging to 60% above the norm when the cute Pug dog with antlers appears.

Boots – Discover More: Peaks of fear and disgust sprinkled with some happiness

Viewers saw the Boots ad as lacking a narrative. There were small peaks of ‘fear’, possibly due to a sense of disorientation as the ad moved quickly from scene to scene. Viewers also registered spikes of ‘disgust’, probably due to the heavy emphasis on product placement and limited human interaction, which can leave audiences feeling manipulated. Near the end there are small peaks of ‘happiness’ as a woman finally makes eye contact and waves to viewers.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

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e-commerce Editor's pick mobile technology

Are we really going to shop from the Apple Watch? What retail apps are trying to achieve

applewatch

When Apple makes a major announcement like a move into the wearables category, it’s guaranteed a long line of other businesses will jump on board any which way they can; aiming for success by association with relevant launches of their own.

Needless to say there were multiple new apps created in time for the Apple Watch hitting stores in April on that very basis. 3,500 to be precise. Retail is one of the key categories within that, with Target, Asos, Amazon, JC Penney and Marks & Spencer just some examples of those who introduced new applications specifically.

Many of these brands aren’t normally what we’d consider early movers in such a tech game. So what are they trying to achieve? Are such efforts merely about benefitting from the media coverage likely to follow, or do they actually think there’s potential to be shopping from our wrists?

Head over to Forbes.com for my full story exploring the answers to those questions.

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digital snippets e-commerce social media Startups

Digital snippets: Burberry, Calvin Klein, Moschino, Saks, M&S, Primark

A round-up of all the latest stories surrounding fashion and tech…

 

  • Burberry reveals ‘digital innovation’ partnership with WeChat to strengthen social presence in China [The Drum]
  • Calvin Klein asks fans to snap selfies in their skivvies for #MyCalvins campaign [BrandChannel]
  • Fast-fashion: Moschino offers fans the ability to shop its McDonald’s-themed show live [Dazed Digital]
  • Saks recreates in-store beauty tutorials with six-second videos on Vine [LuxuryDaily]
  • Marks & Spencer launches new website to replace Amazon platform, after three years in the making [The Telegraph]
  • How Primark achieved 1.7m Facebook Likes in just six months [Econsultancy]
  • Former GQ editor Lauren Bans comes out as @CondeElevator Tweeter [Fashionista]
  • New privacy website lets you opt out of tracking in retail stores [AdAge]
  • Ebay buys virtual fitting room start-up PhiSix Fashion Labs [PC Mag]