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Editor's pick sustainability

Consumer demand for accountability and sustainability is on the rise, says report

Fashion Revolution
Fashion Revolution

Ahead of Black Friday, arguably the biggest global shopping day each year, Fashion Revolution has launched a report highlighting that European consumers are urging brands and governments to take the lead in the fight for sustainability within the fashion industry.

Consumers want to know more about the social and environmental impacts of their garments when shopping, and it is incumbent on brands and governments to address those issues, the research reveals.

“The pace of change by the fashion industry simply isn’t moving fast enough, and we can see this reflected in consumer attitudes,” said Sarah Ditty, Fashion Revolution’s policy director. “People have an urgent, emotional desire to know more about how their clothes are made, and that they haven’t harmed the environment, the people who made them nor were tested on animals. And they want governments to hold brands and retailers to account to ensure this happens.”

Conducted across the five largest EU markets (UK, Germany, France, Spain and Italy), the findings from the study reveal that under the topic of sustainability, environmental factors such as climate change (85%) and environmental protection (88%) are considered important by the majority of people, followed by social issues such as global poverty (84%) and gender inequality (77%).

Furthermore, 72% of those surveyed said that fashion brands should do more to improve the lives of the women making their clothes – there is a gender split in opinion, however, as 81% of women surveyed think brands should tackle gender inequality, against 72% of male respondents.

Meanwhile the government should be more proactive in not only ensuring practices are established, but developing tools to communicate it back to the population, it finds.

In an era of extreme distrust in institutions, this cry for change is more relevant than ever. The report shows that the majority of people (68%) place responsibility on the government to hold fashion brands accountable for their sustainability methods. 77% think that fashion brands should be required by law to respect the human rights of everybody involved in making their products, while 75% think they should protect the environment at every stage of the supply chain. Additionally, 72% say brands should provide information about the environmental impact of their business.

“We’d like the general public, companies and governments to use our research to help drive change in the fashion industry, to better influence their peers to care more about social and environmental issues in fashion and start asking vital questions about the impacts of our clothing,” added Ditty.

How information is communicated is a vital part of the puzzle in helping consumers match their sustainability goals with actual purchase. An earlier report by Fashion Revolution also highlighted that 80% of consumers think brands should publish which factories were used to manufacture their clothes, or which suppliers they use to source their materials from (77%).

Earlier this week, fashion data platform Lyst unveiled its year in fashion report for 2018, which trackers over 100m searches on its site over the past 12 months to analyze the trends and the buzziest brands. It revealed a 47% increase in shoppers looking for items that have sustainable credentials, using terms like “vegan leather” and “organic cotton”. Veja, a French-Brazilian sneaker brand that uses sustainable that uses sustainable materials, showed a 113% year-on-year uptick on searches, for example.

How are you thinking about sustainability? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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business Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media Startups sustainability technology

ICYMI: Apparel manufacturing coming home, shopping by voice, French brands focus on startups

Is apparel manufacturing coming home?
Is apparel manufacturing coming home?

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Is apparel manufacturing coming home? [McKinsey]
  • Voice command: is it the future of online shopping? [FashionUnited]
  • French retail and fashion groups deepen focus on startups [WWD]
  • Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger are sending a clear signal that Amazon is the future of fashion, and it’s terrible news for department stores [Business Insider]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Magic Leap is real and it’s a janky marvel [TechCrunch]
  • Fast Retailing signs deal to fully automate warehousing [WWD]
  • ‘Building the digital factory’: 3D printing comes to Shopify [Digiday]
  • Chinese investment into computer vision technology and AR surges as US funding dries up [TechCrunch]
  • Amy Winehouse is going on tour as a hologram [Hypebeast]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Dove gets certified cruelty-free [FashionNetwork]
  • Why fashion’s anti-fur movement is winning [BoF]
  • The Maiyet Collective’s concept store: reshaping ethical lux [Stylus]
  • You buy a purse at Walmart. There’s a note inside from a “Chinese prisoner.” Now what? [Vox]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Amazon Fashion to launch London pop-up [Drapers]
  • Brandless is launching a pop-up shop in NYC [TechCrunch]
  • Supreme envy: The drop model gets used for burgers, tacos, toothbrushes [Digiday]
  • Jenna Lyons is back, and she’s returning with a brand-new multi-platform venture [Vogue]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Three Nasty Gal ads banned by watchdog [FashionNetwork]
  • ASOS unveils campaign and collection for new Gen-Z label Collusion* [TheIndustry]
  • Adidas launches new membership program [HighSnobiety]
  • Why brands are launching secret apps for superfans [BoF]
  • Snapchat becomes the mobile HBO with 12 daily scripted Original shows [TechCrunch]
  • Superdry unveils disabled mannequin shop window for Invictus Games [TheIndustry]
PRODUCT
  • Alexander Wang is launching a new Uniqlo collaboration that’s all about underwear [Vogue]
BUSINESS
  • Judge removes Deciem founder from CEO role [BoF]
  • Sears files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy [WSJ]
  • Superdry issues profits warning [Drapers]
  • Coast falls into administration and is bought by Karen Millen [TheIndustry]
  • Walmart acquires online lingerie retailer Bare Necessities [Reuters]
  • Lyst launches French version after LVMH investment [FashionNetwork]
CULTURE
  • The most diverse fashion season ever on the runway, but not the front row [NY Times]
  • Met Costume Institute embraces ‘Camp’ for 2019 blockbuster show [NY Times]
  • ‘Gender Bending Fashion’ to be focus of new show at Museum of Fine Arts in Boston next March [WWD]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce film Retail social media Startups sustainability technology

ICYMI: LVMH’s digital strategy, feathers in fashion, the McQueen documentary

Proenza Schouler
Proenza Schouler

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Decoding LVMH’s digital strategy [BoF]
  • Is the use of feathers in fashion any more ethical than fur? [Fashionista]
  • The McQueen documentary tells the story of the people who carry his legacy [Vogue]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Why Nordstrom is betting on high-touch tech [Fortune]
  • Avery Dennison and SoftWear Automation to create digital supply chain for manufacturers [SupplyChainDigital]
SUSTAINABILITY
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • How Sephora built a beauty empire to survive the retail apocalypse [CBInsights]
  • This is how a brick-and-mortar store can thrive in the age of Amazon [NYMag]
  • Urban Outfitters launches third-party marketplace, tests self-checkout [RetailDive]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Nike sells out of Facebook Messenger sneaker drop in less than an hour [RetailDive]
  • Givenchy and Stella McCartney score on Instagram at Royal Wedding [WWD]
  • Victoria’s Secret is still advertising to women like it’s 1999 [Bloomberg]
  • Esprit’s Instagram posts are now shoppable [FashionUnited]
  • This Ikea print ad is designed to put you to sleep [CreativityOnline]
  • Do influencers need regulating? [BoF]
BUSINESS
  • Balenciaga is now the fastest-growing label at Kering? [Harper’s Bazaar]
  • LVMH invests $60 million into fashion platform Lyst [HypeBeast]
  • Richemont clinches takeover of Yoox Net-A-Porter [Reuters]
  • Can the Model Alliance Respect program make a difference? [Vogue]
Categories
data e-commerce

Gucci tops first hottest brands list from Lyst and The Business of Fashion

Lyst3


E-commerce player Lyst has teamed up with The Business of Fashion to introduce a new ranking of fashion’s hottest brands and biggest products.

The Lyst Index relies on information pulled from the Lyst site – which tracks 4.5 million data points per hour from over 65 million annual consumers, 4 million products and 12,000 brands – as well as Google search data. The formula takes into account search, page views (across devices), engagement, intent rate and conversion.

For Q2 of this year, Gucci comes out top, rising three places since April 2017 to overtake Yeezy and Vetements, which ranked in second and fourth place respectively, with Balenciaga rising from ninth to number three. Gucci also sees four products listed in the 10 best-selling products globally, with its GG Blooms slides topping the list overall.

The Business of Fashion puts that rise down to Gucci’s ability to connect with millennial and Gen Z consumers. The report reads: “Alessandro Michele’s maximalist-magpie aesthetic translates extremely well to digital channels, while the brand’s marketing strategies, such as the meme-led campaign for Gucci watches in March, and Glen Luchford’s recent ‘50s sci-fi inspired video have proved successful experiments.”

The Lyst Index
The Lyst Index

It highlights the fact sales to millennial and Gen Z consumers grew at double-digit rate in the first of the 2017 fiscal year, and retention is high. It also outlines that Gucci sales rose to €1,48 billion in Q2, up 39.3% year over year and beating analysts’ expectations by 7%. Operating profit for H1 was over €907 million, up 69% from about €537 million last year.

Yeezy at number two it puts down to the ongoing buzz around founder Kanye West and the fact he’s married to one of the most photographed women in the world, as well as the clever pricing and distribution strategy that Adidas has deployed.

Meanwhile, Balenciaga at number three is attributed to the streetwear attitude to couture that Demna Gvasalia has introduced as well as some clever marketing plays. But it was reportedly its inadvertent part in the Ikea shopping bag viral meme that caused its biggest search increase in the quarter.

Other brands listed in the top 10 include Givenchy, Valentino, Y-3, Prada, Nike and Fendi, while those with winning products further include Saint Laurent, Chloé, Diane Von Furstenberg, Common Projects and Comme Des Garçons.

This is the first in a series of four quarterly Lyst Index reports.

The Lyst Index
The Lyst Index

Categories
data technology

Lyst uses augmented reality to digitally dress naked TV star

Lyst augmented reality
Lyst’s AR campaign featuring reality TV star Spencer Matthews

Online marketplace Lyst presented the world’s first augmented reality (AR) “humannequins” to celebrate the launch of London Fashion Week last week.

Near-naked models were on display in a store window ready for passersby to digitally dress them using AR on their tablets or mobiles. Included among them was reality TV star Spencer Matthews.

Viewers selected items from the hottest outfits and styles currently trending on Lyst in central London, based on an algorithmic interrogation of millions of searches and transactions fulfilled through the platform. Creative tech firm, M, captured textures and garment details close up using a 360-degree photographic rig. Shoppers could then zoom in/out and around the models without diminished picture quality.

Showcasing AR’s playful side, Lyst used technology reminiscent of Cher Horowitz’s high-tech wardrobe in Clueless. When the film debuted in 1995, computer-generated wardrobe organisation was too distant to contemplate seriously on a commercial level. Fast-forward 20 years later and numerous brands have explored what this might look like in reality, albeit largely still at a campaign or PR level.

Other brands utilising AR during fashion week include Rebecca Minkoff who partnered with shopping app Zeekit in New York. Viewers could upload a photo of themselves and “try on” garments from the catwalk. Meanwhile, models at the Desigual show wore make-up and accessories mimicking Shapchat filters, flipping the whole idea of AR around with amusing results.

AR blurs the lines between reality and digital, creating an experience that can be shared, as per the Pokémon Go phenomenon. Expect to see more of this type of technology during fashion week this season, and beyond.

Interested to find out more about augmented reality? Join us for the next in our #FashMash insights series for a deep-dive masterclass and hotly-anticipated panel debate on this technology.

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digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Inside the Vogue x Apple relationship, Gucci’s digital strategy, Farfetch raises $110m

Gucci

It probably goes without saying you’re well and truly over the plethora of stories covering the cyber-themed Met Gala looks (including the true wearable tech pieces), but if you haven’t read Racked’s piece on the relationship between Vogue and Apple in the build-up to the event – as below – then do take the time. Also buzzing in fashion and tech news over the past couple of weeks is everything from further advertising plans on Snapchat to Gucci’s digital strategy and the wearable revolution taking place in Brooklyn. Read on for a complete rundown…


  • Unravelling Vogue and Apple’s self-serving relationship [Racked]

  • The digital strategy driving Gucci’s growth (as pictured) [Glossy]

  • Farfetch raises $110 million in ‘strategic’ move [BoF]

  • William Gibson and Andrew Bolton on the future of fashion and technology [Document Journal]

  • Decoding ‘Manus x Machina’ [BoF]

  • Westfield launches room service retail with interactive mirror [Retail Gazette]

  • Target and Lancôme produce Snapchat’s first e-commerce ads [AdWeek]

  • Old Navy ad with interracial couple sparks a social media firestorm [BrandChannel]

  • Louis Vuitton and Snapchat team up to bring live coverage of world class sailing event [The Drum]

  • Lyst inspires post-work shopping therapy with subway placements [Luxury Daily]

  • If you don’t get social media-only brand ‘Obsessee,’ you probably aren’t its target audience [Fashionista]

  • Bushy eyebrows and $50k per day on Facebook ads: How a small beauty brand blew up [Forbes]

  • How Snapchat won the Met Gala [WGSN Insider]

  • 10 of the best brands on Snapchat right now (and why they’re so great) [Hubspot]

  • How to build a brand on Instagram [Fashionista]

  • Brooklyn’s wearable revolution [NY Times]

  • Why Silicon Valley VC firms fund online retailers like Dollar Shave Club [Seattle Times]

  • Is Flipkart turning into the perfect example of what a tech startup must not do? [Quartz]

  • The future of shopping: trapping you in a club you didn’t know you joined [Bloomberg]

  • The future of the fashion show, according to MatchesFashion.com’s Ruth and Tom Chapman [Vogue]

  • This new tool wants to make the off-price clothing business easier [Fast Company]

  • Digiday launches new fashion and luxury publication, Glossy [Digiday]

  • Heated coats and Kate Moss holograms: the key moments fashion and technology have collided [Daily Telegraph]

  • This video of Anna Wintour introducing the @Voguemagazine app is oddly threatening [Fashionista]

  • The sneakerhead bot problem is getting worse and Nike has the only answer (so far) [HighSnobiety]

  • What fashion brands can learn from Beyoncé’s Lemonade [BoF]
Categories
data e-commerce Editor's pick mobile

Uber and Lyst team up to stand out, offer free swag at #NYFW

LYST_I've got clothes, in different area codes_skyline

Uber might be introducing services that help you get your shopping faster, but during New York Fashion Week it’s letting you get it for free too.

The taxi-hailing app has teamed up with fashion e-commerce platform Lyst for a campaign called “I’ve got clothes, in different area codes”. It provides Uber users in New York with the opportunity to win “style packs”, otherwise known as goodie bags, filled with different designer fashion items depending on what’s trending in their neighbourhood (inspired by data on the Lyst site).

All they have to do is open the app between 11am and 3pm (EST) today, anywhere in Manhattan or select areas of Brooklyn, and enter the promo code FINDNYFW to unlock the special STYLEPACK option.

Uber x Lyst

The goodie bags will be curated to four different areas: Uptown, Midtown, Downtown and Brooklyn, and be available on a first come, first serve basis. Included will be items like sunglasses, hats, scarves and backpacks, with more than 20 brands participating varying from Violet Grey, Theory, Edie Parker and Jonathan Simkhai, to Maiyet, Totokaelo and Alexis Bittar.

The move is part of an aim by Lyst to be noticed during the busy fashion week period. “E-commerce sites often struggle to engage with fashion week, since it’s a time when brands show clothing that won’t be available for months,” US senior vice president and Lyst general manager Chondita Chatterjee, told WWD.

For those not in New York, Lyst is also giving away an exclusive custom Flavia clutch by Edie Parker via an Instagram competition.

Categories
Comment data e-commerce Editor's pick film mobile social media Startups technology

2015: a designer meets digital year in review

AppleWatch_Hermes

It’s been another big year for the fashion industry and its integration with technology: from the release of the (Hermès) Apple Watch, to Natalie Massenet’s departure from Net-a-Porter as it merged with Yoox, not to mention the ongoing and evolving discussions around fashion weeks becoming consumer-facing events.

There’s also been a broadening discussion on the role smart fabrics play in the wearables space, virtual reality is increasingly on our radar for its relevance to retail, and we’re obsessed with how the industry is slowly adapting to a new aesthetic thanks to apps like Snapchat.

Here then, are 10 of the posts you loved the most on Fashion & Mash this year. It’s a collection nodding to many of the aforementioned subjects we continue to track, as well as the likes of personalisation, data, instant messaging, emojis and more. A veritable feast of trends we’re watching across the digital landscape as we head into the New Year…

Thank you for reading and see you in 2016. Wishing you a very happy holidays from everyone here at the (growing!) Fashion & Mash team.

Categories
data e-commerce Editor's pick mobile

Cyber Monday, Black Friday: Big numbers and bigger questions

dollar-bills

The intense focus on numbers at this time of year can be rather wearing, not to say confusing. Every day it seems we hear about percentage sales that have gone up or down and billions of dollars or pounds spent in stores, online or via smartphones.

However, what matters as much as the numbers themselves is the story behind them and what it all means for understanding the evolving consumer, for quarterly profits and for future strategy.

Take Adobe Digital Index’s final Cyber Monday tally, which includes some really big numbers. US shoppers, it seems spent 16% more this Cyber Monday than last and sales hit $3.07bn, the first time the day broke through the $3bn barrier in the US.

Discounts, smartphones and stock problems

What drove those numbers? Deeper-than-ever discounts, according to Adobe. Whether that’s good news or bad will become clear when November same-store sales reports and Q4 earnings reports are released. For a fashion industry trying to get consumers used to paying full price, discount-driven higher sales could be a double-edged sword that boosts revenue but also slices through margins. We’ll have to wait and see on that one.

Smartphones also helped make the numbers bigger. A lot of browsing was done via mobile and Adobe said 26% of actual transactions were via mobile devices.

But one factor that didn’t drive sales was the huge out-of-stock problem. I’ve already reported news that 15 out of every 100 products returned ‘unavailable’ messages on Monday. That’s no surprise given that, at 17%, US online sales between Thursday and Sunday outpaced Cyber Monday’s 16%. Americans spent around $8.03bn on those four days with the average order worth over $135 leaving many virtual shelves empty by end-of-play on Sunday.

Physical stores

OK, we know online sales exploded. How did that affect trips to physical stores? Store visits in the US were, unsurprisingly, down 10.4% on Cyber Monday, ShopperTrak said, falling to (an albeit huge) $20.43bn.

And a shift in the balance towards online was a key a characteristic of the whole shopping weekend. Over 103m people in the US shopped online over the four-day weekend but under 102m shopped in-store, the National Retail Federation said.

Obviously, lots of people are still shopping in physical stores but with the numbers going down, we could see some major rethinks in retailer initiatives next year.

What did they buy?

Back with that $3.07bn Cyber Monday number, key product categories were dominated by electronics and toys, aided by average discounts a little over 20%. Fashion certainly wasn’t the top priority and I’ve seen some contradictory reports about how the category performed Thursday-through-Monday either in stores or online. But there were some interesting stats released this morning.

We’ve already highlighted figures from Lyst on this site showing that where people were buying clothes and accessories, the big success story wasn’t partywear as might be expected, but loungewear. Consumers snapped up those comfortable pieces that they could buy any time of year but that came with hefty discounts attached. Not convinced? Lyst data showed 13% more purchases of slippers than stilettos, 43% more sweatpants than miniskirts, and three hoodies bought for every blouse.

The report also cited a focus on luxe loungewear with cashmere socks, luxury pyjama styles, high-end onesies and blanket scarves all popular. Apparently, Acne’s oversized Canada scarf sold out in minutes across all of Lyst’s global retail partners.

What does this mean for partywear? With many prices now back to ‘normal’ levels after the Black Friday/Cyber Monday frenzy, stores must be hoping that shoppers won’t delay their party purchases too long or panic discounting could hit closer to Christmas.

Future focus

Analysts at the moment don’t seem to be worried about the high level of discounting with NPD’s Marshal Cohen saying “businesses fared better this year because they planned it out better.”

But there’s no denying that for November/December 2016, they’ll need to up their game again and plan even better still. What are the factors to take into account?

  • Sales via smartphone are going through the roof but with sales of tablets at both ends of the price scale (iPad minis and Amazon Fire) surging over the four-day weekend, shopping apps still need to be tablet-friendly.
  • Laptop and desktop shopping has stayed popular and was key for higher value transactions.
  • Consumers are increasingly happy to shop at unsociable hours and this should be encouraged given the amount of website outages at busier times later in the day. Thanksgiving evening and midnight to 07:00 on Black Friday and Cyber Monday are key.
  • In Britain, Black Friday is not seen as a must-do-it day to shop in-store but Saturday is. All the special events retailers lay on won’t necessarily encourage Brits to take the day off when they can head down to the mall for the same bargains just 24 hours later.
  • In-store sales are falling on both sides of the Atlantic but are still high. Retailers need to lay on special events but timing is crucial as such initiatives alone won’t lure people to stores (see point above).
  • E-tailers need to do just what they thought they’d done after last year – work harder to ensure websites don’t crash.
  • They also need to manage inventory more carefully so that fewer goods are out of stock on Cyber Monday.
  • We need answers to the question of how long the Black Friday/Cyber Monday ‘season’ really is. We’ve heard talk of Black Friday Fortnight and Cyber Week. Planning how far in advance to kick off discounts and how long to continue them is crucial.
  • And of course, retailers must get to grips with the problem of maximising full price sales. Eternal discounting may work for some retail giants but for most businesses, margin protection is what’s key.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

Categories
data e-commerce Editor's pick

Netflix and chill? Forget partywear, Cyber Weekend sales were all about lounge gear says Lyst

Lyst_loungewear

Given we’re headfirst into party season, with every retailer online and offline focusing their efforts accordingly on occasionwear, you’d be forgiven for thinking sales over this past weekend would have reflected similar thought.

But that’s where you’d be wrong…

During the Black Friday to Cyber Monday period, it was out with the party dresses and high heels, and in with luxury loungewear fit for curling up on the couch in, according to Lyst.

The e-commerce platform said it saw 13% more purchases of slippers than stilettos, 43% more sweatpants sold than mini skirts, and three hoodies bought for every blouse.

It also saw cashmere socks trending, and shoppers choosing traditional, cosy pyjama styles over ‘sexier’ lingerie pieces; full-length, long sleeve sets by Calvin Klein and DKNY out-sold more delicate lace and silk nightwear. There was also a big uptick in searches for luxury onesies and blanket scarves, with Acne’s oversized Canada scarf selling out in minutes across Lyst’s global retail partners.

It’s a Christmas for cosy, comfortable styles made in feel-good fabrications, said the site in a statement.

That insight comes from Lyst’s analysis of search, sales and active browsing data across its 11,000 partner retailers and brands, and shoppers in 180 countries. In any given hour, Lyst analyses over 4.5 million points of fashion data. Check out its tongue-in-cheek debut campaign displaying some of the search terms it sees its users focus on.