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7 ways fashion brands are harnessing hologram technology

We all remember the vision of Tupac being brought back to life by hologram technology during Coachella in 2012. 

Divided though opinion was, the interesting fact lay in the advance of the tech itself. Today, it is entirely possible for life-like constructs to be achieved in 3D so as to be visible to the naked eye. And more to the point, increasingly in a cost-effective way too. 

Today, it is estimated that the holography market will be worth $5.5 billion by 2020.

Fashion is one industry that has been experimenting in this space for some time, using holograms as both elaborate marketing techniques, as well as more immersive in-store opportunities aiming to drive brand engagement. 

Here are seven of the most interesting examples we’ve seen released over the years…

Alexander McQueen
Kate Moss hologram

In 2006, Kate Moss became the first human hologram to be featured as a part of a major fashion show. Alexander McQueen presented the 3D rendering of the supermodel as the finale of his ‘Windows of Culloden’ show in Paris. The hologram of Moss in a flowing white gown appeared out of nowhere to the audience from inside an empty glass pyramid following an elaborate puff of white smoke. The model danced for a few seconds before shrinking and dematerializing.

This iconic hologram, designed by video maker Baillie Walsh and directed by Lee McQueen himself, has become an iconic moment in fashion history and as such even saw revivals in 2011 and 2015 at the Savage Beauty Exhibits, dedicated to McQueen, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London respectively.

Diesel
Diesel SS08

In 2007, contemporary denim brand Diesel took the concept one step further from McQueen’s show the previous year by creating the biggest holographic fashion show to date for its Summer 2008 collection in Florence. The ‘Liquid Space’ show incorporated holograms that were created using the Pepper’s Ghost effect, an optical illusion that uses angled glass and hidden spaces, the technology for which was provided by tech specialist company Vizoo.

The campaign centred around marine creatures in space and used hologram technology to merge 2D projections of a high definition multi-screen video of the creatures with the real life models. The video images? were projected onto multiple transparent screens while careful lighting illuminated the catwalk with little or no scatter on the holographic screens. The virtual and real life elements on the catwalk consequently appeared as one to the audience.

Pinar&Viola
Pinar & Viola hologram

Dutch artists Pinar&Viola also used hologram technology to project an entirely virtual fashion line onto real life models in 2016 at their Amsterdam Fashion Week show. The occasion was designed to prompt emotions about clothing and encourage consumers to reconsider their rate of consumption in order to reduce wasted resources. The show was created in collaboration with AMFI student Amber Slooten and inspired by the mixed reality concepts of companies like Magic Leap and Microsoft’s HoloLens. Its aim was to explore how a future of holographic garments might work. 

The technology also allowed each piece of clothing to be animated through the allocation of characteristics such as eyes and mouths to further emphasize the conscious theme and help viewers to greater connect with the clothes despite them being inanimate.

Ralph Lauren
Holographic Ralph Lauren

The 2018 GQ Men of the Year Awards saw another first on the holographic medium front as pioneering designer Ralph Lauren beamed in via the medium to accept his ‘Design Lead of the Year’ award. The innovative concept was also created in celebration of the brand’s 50th anniversary. The realistic installation was created by Cinimod Holograms and used a staged box located away from the stage to create the theatre. The concept enabled the real life presenter at the awards to stand alongside and interact with Ralph’s hologram in a highly realistic and entertaining way for the audience.

This spectacle followed a series of other hologram integrations by the brand in previous years, including holographic window displays of sparring boxers in its Fifth Avenue flagship in New York in 2017 to promote the release of the new Polo Sport line, and the virtual spring 2015 Polo Womenswear show back in 2014  in Central Park.

Nicholas Kirkwood
CyFi walking at the Nicholas Kirkwood show

Footwear designer Nicholas Kirkwood is another that has utilized holograms by incorporating them in his inaugural London Fashion Week show in September 2018. Current Global worked with the brand to strategize the theme of the show, enhancing its cyber-reality theme by showcasing innovative visual technologies and integrating the experience of “white-hat” hackers in the presentation.

The result also saw a number of 3D hologram displays integrated throughout the show venue in order to enhance its underlying message of non-conformity. Created by tech company, Hologrm, they presented an animated 3D version of the collection’s main boot with neon detailing.

Wrangler
Wrangler’s immersive pop-up

US denim brand Wrangler also recently got on board with holograms, marking its Wrangler Icons launch with a 360-degree immersive pop-up experience that incorporated musicians and actors as well as numerous uses of the technology. The London experience paid homage to the brand’s musical heritage and iconic star-studded clientele from across the years. 

A continuous hologram feature was used to modernize the initiative, as well as helping to link the music theme back to the brand’s western image. A small black room at the back of the space appeared at first glance to house just drums and speakers however, broadcasted on top of the various instruments were holograms of dancing Wrangler cowboys wearing jeans and cowboy hats. The futuristic projections ran on a loop throughout the duration of the event.

Cartier
Cartier holographic watch

Of all of the fashion brands that have used holography over the years, luxury jeweller Cartier has perhaps one of the longest standing relationships with the technology. Back in 1972 the brand generated a lot of attention through its projection of a diamond bracelet dangling from an elegant wrist onto the Fifth Avenue pavement from its store window, which aimed to entice customers in. The piece, which was created by artist Robert Schinella, elicited so many enquiries that it was later revived again in 1979.

Cartier has also harnessed other forms of holograms as the technology has developed over the years, including a virtual craftsman working at a physical station at the Tokyo National Museum’s Cartier Exhibition in 2009, and a store windows campaign in 2015 where a hologram story mapped onto a physical watch face showing the inner workings and intricate parts involved in a watch.

How are you thinking about new technology? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Each of the rules referenced above is matched by one of our products and services. Interested in how? Get in touch to learn more.

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Retail technology Uncategorized

Alyx introduces blockchain tag detailing the origin and authenticity of garments

Streetwear brand Alyx has launched a blockchain project during the Copenhagen Fashion Summit this week, that details the origin of its garments.

Developed in collaboration with Avery Dennison, and powered by EVRYTHNG, the tech is showcased via a smart label featuring a QR code that consumers can scan with their smartphones. They will then have access to all the information about the garment’s journey through the supply chain, as well as its sustainability credentials.

To implement the traceability of goods, Alyx’s tag uses a system powered by Iota, the German blockchain foundation. The system enables a distributed ledger technology that has no centralized authority. It means that a transaction is documented every time a product changes hands, generating a permanent history that’s easily accessible.

The use of blockchain can also help to authenticate products, or identify counterfeit goods, a priority for luxury consumers.

““Blockchain and distributed ledger technology is the future for effective brand protection. By supplying product information, supply chain traceability and transparent dialogue with the consumer, the brand’s authenticity is globally secured,” said Alyx’s designer Matthew Williams.

The new tag is expected to roll out to consumers later in 2019.

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Campaigns e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Harvey Nichols introduces shoppable choir visits via Instagram

Harvey Nichols' Harvey's Angels
Harvey Nichols’ Harvey’s Angels

Ahead of the holiday season, British department store Harvey Nichols has introduced a charitable shopping experience discoverable via a real-life choir whose looks are available via Instagram.

The initiative benefits women going into the job’s market through the Smart Works charity.

The Harvey’s Angels, as the choir is called, were sent to offices across London – from Google to Estée Lauder – last week, donning partywear available to shop from the retailer, by designers such as Roland Mouret and Peter Pilotto. All looks could be purchased directly through its Instagram account via shoppable posts.

Additionally over four days, 10% of all purchases made at Harvey Nichols’ Knightsbridge location or online using the code “HNAngels” went to Smart Works.

“At Smart Works we are lucky enough to witness every day the impact that great clothes and good advice can have on a women’s life. We believe that fashion can be used as a force for good, and that is why we are thrilled to be working with Harvey Nichols on this exciting Christmas shopping experience,” says Kate Stephens, CEO of Smart Works. “Every shopper at Harvey Nichols who uses the dedicated code HNangels online or in store over the next three days will be helping a women to be her best.” The charity gives women across the country the tools to enter the job’s market, including clothing and self-belief and practical tools required to succeed.

For Harvey Nichols, the campaign ties to the company’s history as well as its continuous support of women in the workplace – at present, seven out of nine people of the company’s board are women.

“Our partnership with Smart Works is a natural extension of our values. Christmas is the fashion season, because it’s also party season. But we know that our customers are rushed off their feet,” said Deb Bee, group marketing and creative director at Harvey Nichols. “So we have partnered with Smart Works to raise awareness of this partnership and help busy women in London find a party outfit even if they can’t take time out of work. This will be delivered in the most Christmassy way we know; with a fun, glamorous, party-song-singing, shoppable Christmas choir.”

Are you thinking innovatively enough in your brand messaging? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Campaigns Editor's pick film technology

Barneys unveils VR film with Samsung and contemporary dance company

Mantle by Barneys New York
Mantle by Barneys New York

Barneys New York has launched Mantle, a virtual reality film and experience in collaboration with New York-based Martha Graham Dance Company and Samsung as its tech and distribution partner.

The film aims to blend fashion, technology and contemporary dance as it showcases dancers wearing exclusive designer looks straight from the runway.

“Barneys New York has always been centered around fashion and its role within culture,” said Matthew Mazzucca, creative director of Barneys New York. “By partnering with another iconic New York institution, the Martha Graham Dance Company, along with Samsung, we are proud to give our customers an immersive experience in our stores and on Barneys.com that fuses high design with art, performance, and technology. All of these elements are pillars of the experiences Barneys New York is known for.”

Mantle features four principal dancers from the Martha Graham Dance Company, each embodying different parts of the human psyche – power, ethereal, possessed and the cleaner – as well as former company members ranging up to 70 years of age. The cast wears designs by Prabal Gurung, The Row, Rick Owens, Loewe and Craig Green, all of which will be on display in the department store’s windows, as well as in the Mantle viewing experience inside.

The film is available to watch in virtual reality in-store with Gear VR powered by Oculus headsets through the Samsung VR app, and online on Barney’s online platform The Window. Users of Samsung’s VR content service app can also access it from home through their own headsets.

“No other medium can really envelop consumers into a brand universe and create brand affinity like virtual reality. We are thrilled that Barneys New York was inspired by our Gear VR technology and the immersive storytelling that VR can facilitate,” said Zach Overton, VP of brand experience at Samsung Electronics America. “At Samsung, we aim to create innovative partnerships, like our relationship with Barneys New York, to help brands reinvent how they connect with consumers.”

Filmed using a 360-degree camera, the short film was by Theo Stanley and choreographed by former MGDC teacher Cynthia Stanley. Additional collaborators include set designer Stefan Beckham and composer Sam Wagster.

“We’re creating a new experience,” Mazzucca told WWD. “We’ve gotten into pursuing what the idea of storytelling means. There’s a lot of great innovations happening in AR and VR. We understand what the retail experience can be. Seeing apparel in a VR space and how it’s captured will start something. Having immersive experiences is something we’re going to keep hammering at.”