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COVID-19: Gucci shakes up fashion calendar, Allbirds and Adidas collaborate, Luxury’s e-commerce challenge

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • 5 brands launched during the pandemic (WWD)
  • Is transparency in fashion a dead end? (Vogue Business)
  • The iconic launches 100% recycled packaging (Drapers)
  • Gucci, Givenchy, Dior & other big brands are name-checked in new report on the $20 billion-plus illegal wildlife trade (The Fashion Law)
RETAIL & COMMERCE
  • The shift to e-commerce poses a challenge for luxury brands (Vogue Business)
  • The store of the future is coming this summer. Here’s what it looks like. (Modern Retail)
  • Beauty brand leaders predict the future of omnichannel (Glossy)
  • What the pandemic reveals about e-commerce (RetailDive)
  • Experiential retail will get a digital facelift in the post-coronavirus world (Modern Retail)
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • The first Animal Crossing fashion show is here (Vogue)
  • Benefit cosmetics brings AR tool to Wechat (Mobile Marketer)
  • Tommy Hilfiger livestreams event to sell spring lines (WWD)
  • These brands are speaking out against racism on social media (AdWeek)
PRODUCT
  • With this antiviral fabric coating, your clothing could protect you from COVID-19 (Fast Company)
  • Can Venus Williams’ sunscreen launch bring more inclusivity to clean beauty? (Glossy)
  • Allbirds and Adidas embark on new collaboration to create shoe with ‘lowest ever carbon footprint’ (Fashionista)
  • CLOT x Rhude collaboration drops at the perfect time (Jing Daily)
BUSINESS
  • Gucci abandons ‘worn-out ritual’ of fashion seasons as the industry looks inward (CNN)
  • With Neiman Marcus filing for bankruptcy, what’s next for Bergdorf Goodman? (Vogue)
  • How Harrod’s is solving its excess inventory problem (BoF)
  • Despite the crisis, luxury continues to attract investments (WWD)
  • Alibaba attempts to replicate Taobao model overseas (Jing Daily)
  • Zalando makes sustainability mandatory for all brands (WWD)
CULTURE
  • The polarizing allure of sneaker culture (WWD)
  • Gen-Z consumers’ appetite for luxury goods is still intact despite COVID-19 (The Fashion Law)
  • Wellness is the new luxury after COVID-19 for China (Jing Daily)
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business digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Macy’s buys Story, Gucci’s new flagship, AI and the future of fashion

Futuristic fashion by Tim Walker
Futuristic fashion by Tim Walker

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Macy’s buys Story concept [RetailDive]
  • Gucci plants its flag in Soho [BoF]
  • How artificial intelligence will impact the future of fashion [Vogue]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Can AI and AR turn your prospects into customers? [Inc]
  • How beauty brands like Coty and Shiseido are using voice assistants [Glossy]
  • Ticketmaster to trial facial recognition technology at live venues [Venture]
  • Verisart brings blockchain certification to the global art auction market [TechCrunch]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • Fast fashion goes green with mushrooms, lumber scraps, and algae [Bloomberg]
  • Applied DNA Sciences confirms traceability of leather [WWD]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Walmart.com redesigns as the anti-Amazon [Co.Design]
  • Farfetch partners with Stadium Goods on sneaker hub [WWD]
  • Brandless’ pop-up is focused on community engagement rather than selling products [AdWeek]
  • China’s live-streaming fashion boom changing the way Gen Z shops [SCMP]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Inside the bitter war to bring Tupac and Michael Jackson back to life [Wired]
  • Diet Prada unmasked [BoF]
  • Instagram quietly launches payments for commerce [TechCrunch]
PRODUCT
  • Amsterdam is solving its gum litter problem by making shoes out of recycled gum [AdWeek]
  • ElektroCouture: Inside the fashion house behind Swarovski’s $60,000 light-up dress [Forbes]
BUSINESS
  • Over 400 startups are trying to become the next Warby Parker. Inside the wild race to overthrow every consumer category [Inc]
  • Prada: Making the most of its moment [BoF]
  • Alibaba’s anti-counterfeit group now has 105 brand members, including L’Oréal and Bose [TheDrum]
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data digital snippets e-commerce mobile product social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Pokémon Go, McQueen’s DNA, luxury’s executive changes, AI, VR and more

McQueen pure human - digital snippets
Alexander McQueen’s DNA turned into leather in designer Tina Gorjanc’s Pure Human project

If there’s one thing that’s grabbed everyone’s attention this past fortnight, it has of course been Pokémon Go. The augmented reality mobile game has reportedly gained as many users as Uber and Tinder, topped Twitter’s daily users, and started seeing people spend more time with it than in Facebook. It also caused Nintendo’s share price to increase by more than $7bn.

We published a great piece looking at what retailers can learn from it in a broader location-marketing sense.  Also worth reading is this story tracking the retail invasion of Pokémons, via Racked, and another looking at why retailers should care about Pokémon’s forthcoming ads.

Beyond that, the news to know in the fashion, digital comms and technology space this week (and there’s a lot of it!), spans everything from an experiment with DNA in textile design to the plethora of changes at the helm of the industry’s luxury houses, the impact artificial intelligence might have on brands, not to mention how we’re faring with virtual reality so far…


  • Fashion that gets under the skin – designer creates leather prototypes grown from Alexander McQueen DNA (as pictured) [NY Times]

  • Luxury fashion: a year of big moves [The Industry]

  • Amazon Prime Day: Wow… but not yet a fashion must-buy [Trendwalk]

  • What Amazon could learn from Yoox Net-a-Porter, the “world’s biggest luxury fashion store” [Quartz]

  • Fashion apparel retailing in the age of artificial intelligence [WWD]

  • Luxury brands get off to an awkward start with virtual reality [Glossy]

  • Is a holographic fashion show for VR clothing the future? [The Creators Project]

  • The store of the future: physical retailers must stage experiences, embrace omnichannel and harness data [BoF]

  • 5 ways shoppers are using mobile to make purchase decisions, according to Google [Fashionista]

  • Sephora is driving mobile sales with Tinder-like features and digital mad libs [Ad Week]

  • Stores must learn to think like Facebook [BoF]

  • Warby Parker is offering Snapchat-exclusive sunglasses [Techcrunch]

  • Birchbox tests Snapchat for customer service – turns to revamped video and voice calling feature [Digiday]

  • Why advertisers are forking over big bucks for custom Snapchat lenses [Ad Week]

  • Snapchat is looking at a way to recognize objects in your snaps and serve you related ads [Business Insider]

  • New study says people are more likely to buy from brands that use virtual reality [Ad Week]

  • Luxury brands embrace digital, but still wary of programmatic [The Drum]

  • Using an algorithm to figure out what luxury customers really want [HBR]

  • Amazon is developing a 3D modelling system to solve online clothes shopping’s biggest problem [Quartz]

  • How the future of fit could spell the end of retail returns [Retail Dive]

  • Back to bricks and mortar: how e-commerce has embraced the real world [The Guardian]

  • Where machines could replace humans—and where they can’t (yet) [McKinsey]

  • Confessions of a fashion start-up founder: ‘Fashion tech is the Wild West’ [Glossy]

  • 3 need-to-know live streaming apps in China (and how bloggers & brands are using them) [WGSN]

  • Payments firm Klarna adds Lyst to its collection [Reuters]

  • How valuable is trend forecasting in the post-internet age? [NJAL]

  • These acrylic nails double as an Oyster Card [PSFK]
Categories
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#ICYMI: Alice + Olivia to live stream “see now, buy now” Coachella show

aliceandolivia_coachella

Hot on the heels of brands like Burberry, Tom Ford and Rebecca Minkoff, comes further news in the “see now, buy now” stakes, and this time not tied to fashion weeks.

New York brand Alice + Olivia is launching a shoppable runway show attached to the behemoth of the US festival season, Coachella.

Held in collaboration with Neiman Marcus, it will run just two short days before the highly anticipated opening weekend of the Californian music festival.

Aptly, the brand’s spring 2016 collection favours a bohemian aesthetic. Though a selection of those pieces were presented at New York Fashion Week back in September 2015, a fresh capsule collection inspired by Grateful Dead will be presented as well.

We’re yet to discover if tie-dye and roughed-up rocker roses will replace creative director and CEO Stacey Bendet’s customary geo prints and ditzy florals, but several sneak-peaks on the brand’s Instagram account point to the expected teddy motif so related to Grateful Dead. The reception by fans has been one of extreme yearning, with the first collection video pushing 15k views in just one day.


T – 1 week til my @gratefuldead capsule hits stores! ? #AOxGratefulDead

A video posted by alice + olivia by StaceyBendet (@aliceandolivia) on


Said Bendet: “A ‘See Now, Buy Now’ runway show is something I have been wanting to do for a few seasons but it took time to feel out when and where felt right. I wanted what I showed on that runway to be relevant to what consumers actually want to wear, now. I came up with the idea to have the show around Coachella and have the runway looks be based upon things that every girl would want to wear to a music festival.”

The entire production will be live streamed on the social media accounts of both Alice + Olivia and Neiman Marcus from its NeueHouse Hollywood venue in LA on April 13. Immediately following the presentation, 12 exclusive items will be available for purchase online giving last minute ticket-holders an opportunity to clinch a less-predictable festival look.

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Editor's pick social media

Periscope is set to make fashion weeks more candid than ever this season

Periscope

Interested in fashion weeks? Prepare to be social media bombarded starting from tomorrow when the shows kick off for another season in New York. Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr, Snapchat (the list goes on), will all have their place, but the new app of choice looks set to be Periscope.

Twitter’s live streaming tool, launched in March 2015, started gaining ground with the fashion set during both the menswear and resort shows earlier this summer. For September, brands including Hunter, Ralph Lauren and Desigual have big plans ahead, while editors and bloggers are likely to be the ones grabbing the most attention as they head from one catwalk to the next.

Caroline Issa, fashion director of Tank and Because magazines, and herself a style icon, used the app heavily during menswear weeks in June and intends to again in New York. “Periscope allows true consumer access to the best in fashion month – I would have loved to have watched my favorite fashion editor’s point of view at the show when I was 17, and now anyone can,” she says. “It means a wonderful inclusion and access to what was [once] truly exclusive – it’s a step closer to the action.”

The team at Twitter are referring to the use of Periscope during fashion weeks as #fashionunfiltered. It’s about real access and no editing, which likely makes it one of the most authentic views of what it’s really like to attend. “Periscope is like a teleportation device, it can take us into another world,” says Georgina Parnell, head of fashion at Twitter UK. “It’s all about giving people a view or an experience they’ve never had before.”

Head over to Forbes to read the rest of the story, find out about what exactly those brands are planning for the season ahead and learn more of Issa’s thoughts about using it.

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digital snippets e-commerce film mobile social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Richemont invites LVMH as e-commerce partner, Google and Levi’s on Project Jacquard, JLab’s final 21 start-ups

A particularly oversized round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

Project-Jacquard

  • Richemont invites LVMH to join site to compete with Amazon [BoF]
  • Google is partnering with Levi’s for its Project Jacquard smart fabric (as pictured) [TNW]
  • The 21 tech start-ups getting John Lewis excited in 2015 [The Drum]
  • Marc Jacobs gets Periscope, follows in footsteps of fashion brands Burberry, DKNY & Rebecca Minkoff [WGSN.com/blogs]
  • Macy’s embraces a ‘digical’ world [AdAge]
  • Why Nordstrom is the Amazon of department stores [Fortune]
  • How an Instagram “like” from artist Alice Lancaster unspired Calvin Klein 2016 resort collection [Vogue]
  • Forever 21 drives sales through consumer-generated outfit gallery [Mobile Commerce Daily]
  • Why adidas created content that no one will ever see [Marketing Magazine]
  • Candie’s focuses campaign on Instagram [Media Post]
  • Wayfair gains three times more revenue from YouTube’s shoppable ads [AdAge]
  • MikMak is the smartphone-based reinvention of the infomercial [TechCrunch]
  • Hey retailers, Pinterest just got a whole lot more shoppable – ‘buy it’ button unveiled [AdWeek]
  • Instagram is introducing new shoppable ads [Yahoo! Style]
  • Buy buy buy: Why all of your favorite social networks want you to shop now [Mashable]
  • From startups to mass retailers, it’s a tough time for fashion [Fashionista]
  • Retailers have mishandled mobile payments for years. It’s time to surrender to tech [Quartz]
  • Can Silicon Valley fix women’s fashion? [Buzzfeed]
  • Fashion films: what works and what doesn’t [Fashionista]
  • At Silicon Valley’s very first fashion week, flying pants seem totally normal [The Verge]
  • Coming soon to your smart watch: ads targeting captive eyeballs [Bloomberg]
  • Bolt Threads raises $32 million to make gene-engineered fabric grown in fermentation vats [Forbes]
  • Why we still don’t have cheap, customisable 3D-printed shoes for all [Fast.Co Design]
  • How bloggers make money on Instagram [Harper’s Bazaar]
  • The Kendall Jenner effect: how social media is changing modelling [MTV]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Yoox, Net-a-Porter, Farfetch, Lord & Taylor, Burberry, Nasty Gal, Nike

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

Yoox

  • The Yoox and Net-a-Porter merger is creating a tech giant as much as a fashion giant [Quartz]
  • Farfetch’s global platform play [BoF]
  • Did Lord & Taylor’s hot Instagram campaign thumb its nose at FTC disclosure rules? [AdWeek]
  • Burberry broadcasts ‘London in L.A.’ show via Periscope [Creativity]
  • Nasty Gal’s uncertain future: does it have what it takes to stay on top? [Racked]
  • Nike’s latest addition to the “lady empowerment ad” genre is one of the most relatable [Fashionista]
  • Stuart Weitzman campaign starts with cool cinemagraphs on Instagram, then follows up on Facebook [AdWeek]
  • Neiman Marcus introduces new image recognition “Snap. Find. Shop” app [Haute Living]
  • How Old Navy is winning at YouTube [Digiday]
  • Old Navy and Banana Republic among first brands to use Instagram’s carousel ads and link to product page [AdAge]
  • Asos eyes emerging artists on Vevo to deepen ties to 20-somethings [The Drum]
  • Amazon quietly acquired Shoefitr to improve how it sells footwear online [TechCrunch]
  • Viral style: why are we obsessed? [BBC]
  • Fashion brands are ignoring the internet because the market hasn’t yet forced them to take action [BoF]
  • What can fashion learn from science? [i-D]
  • Digital beauty businesses aim for breakthrough [BoF]
  • Forget the Internet of Things, there is a digital revolution taking place in our shopping malls [Forbes]
  • If you text this phone number, a guy named Stefan will send you limited-edition clothes [Business Insider]
  • The RealReal raises $40 million to double sales in 2015 [Fashionista]
  • Fashion can win the wearables war [BoF]
  • Ad spend on smart watches estimated to reach nearly $70m by 2019 [The Drum]
  • Six retailers doing the most to make mobile part of the in-store experience [PSFK]
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Editor's pick social media

Calzedonia opts for #TweetCam and Periscope to push swimwear show

CLZ_Calzedonia

Swimwear brand Calzedonia is following in Burberry’s footsteps and introducing the #TweetCam to its summer 2015 catwalk show.

The Italian company has partnered with Twitter to allow fans to gain access to the show via their own personalised shots of it. A series of cameras along the catwalk will capture unique images in real-time to users who tweet using the hashtag and @tweetcalzedonia, sending them back to them with their Twitter handles and a time stamp overlaid.

Calzedonia will also make use of Twitter’s new live-streaming app, Periscope, to capture the scene backstage.

The shows take place twice a day on April 14 and 15, and will also see the launch of the new #CLZ capsule bikini collection, which is aimed at a “young and digital-addicted target”.

A campaign accompanies the line, shot by Mariano Vivanco in London and featuring Instagram and Twitter star Sara Sampaio.

Categories
digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: wearables, Net-a-Porter and Yoox, Facebook messenger, live-streaming apps

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

wristwatches

  • The wearables road ahead: a race to the bottom? [TechCrunch]
  • Net-a-Porter, Yoox merger creates online fashion powerhouse [WGSN.com/blogs]
  • You can now pay your friends through Facebook Messenger [Mashable]
  • Will new live-streaming apps change the way we see fashion week? [Style.com]
  • Marketers weigh in on Periscope vs Meerkat [AdWeek]
  • LVMH’s Tag Heuer surfs wave of smartwatch partnerships [Reuters]
  • Kenneth Cole reveals Connect smartwatch line [BrandChannel]
  • Harrods takes its green-clad doorman global with Instagram contest [Luxury Daily]
  • Inside Balmain’s digital revolution [BoF]
  • Why Sephora’s digital boss joined Stitch Fix, the personal stylist startup that’s growing like mad [re/code]
  • Banana Republic harnesses photographed ‘Hot Dudes Reading’ in Instagram campaign [PSFK]
  • The North Face hopes to rope you in with virtual-reality rock climbing [Chicago Tribune]
  • L’Oreal’s chief digital officer on programmatic plans, start-ups and org charts [AdAge]
  • Meet Betabrand, the company that’s using viral humour and uncensored crowdsourcing to create the future of fashion [Medium]
  • Will personalised pricing take e-commerce back to the bazaar? [BoF]
  • Social media’s elusive goal: return on investment [WWD]
  • How beauty and fashion brands can win on Instagram [Fashionista]
  • Online fashion retail in India may touch $35 billion by 2020 [The Economic Times]
  • Are ‘smart’ clothes the wearables of the future? [re/code]
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Live streaming fashion week – a classic case of quality over quantity

J. JS Lee spring/summer 2015

Last September I wrote a piece for Mashable about the role of live streaming during fashion week today – the engagement it does and doesn’t afford, and ultimately whether the cost involved is worth it for designers.

There were varying viewpoints. Live viewership isn’t especially high, but numerous brands suggested reaching the ‘super fan’ makes it worthwhile. Furthermore, understanding the ROI is a bit of a grey area anyway – many designers record videos of their shows regardless of whether they’re streaming it, so the greater part of the financial investment live streaming requires is already there. Likewise, many have that cost soaked up as part of their show package at say the Lincoln Center with IMG in New York or Somerset House with the BFC in London.

Regardless of that fact, live streams have become so prevalent, they’re also somewhat mundane. Overall there was also a consensus therefore that a point of difference and a specific content strategy beyond just the 10-minutes or so of the show, would help too.

In New York this season, however, quite a few of the big shows, including DKNY and Diane von Furstenberg, who have live streamed for a good number of seasons in the past, opted not to. Similarly, Made Fashion Week didn’t include live streaming as standard with any of its shows from Milk Studios either.

There was quite a response on Twitter; fans complaining about the fact they weren’t getting to see their favourite shows, using choice words like ‘disappointed’ and ‘annoyed’.

The numbers may not be enormous, but seemingly the engagement of those fans that do tune in has the potential to make it worthwhile. The idea of that super fan again, is loud and it’s strong. Even if they’re not yet customers, at the very least they aspire to be.

Which is why it should be credited that the British Fashion Council is fully backing live streaming for its designers this season, with a record 90% of the schedule set to be available to watch online. Even Tom Ford is – for the first time ever – set to live stream on Monday, September 15, which is a significant shift in strategy comparative to his first show for spring/summer 2011 when he only invited one photographer (his own), turned away all the bloggers, and set a strict embargo on information about the collection so as to relate it more closely to the date the garments hit store.

The British Fashion Council estimates the LFW live streams are watched from 190 countries worldwide. Click here for the full schedule: www.londonfashionweek.co.uk/schedule

Pic: J. JS Lee spring/summer 2015