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WeWork and LIKEtoKNOW.it introduce influencer shopping to office spaces

Co-working company WeWork is partnering with influencer shopping platform LIKEtoKNOW.it to host a pop-up space at a London location where all decor is shoppable.

Located at Aviation House, WeWork’s newest office location in London, the space will be open for the month of January and is decorated with influencers and social media sharing in mind, featuring goods from brands such as Urban Outfitters, Amazon, Matalan and Debenhams. All products are then available to shop directly through the LIKEtoKNOW.it app.

“At WeWork, we’re focused on creating a working environment that fosters collaboration as well as productivity, and this LIKEtoKNOW.it pop-up will only increase the opportunities for our members to connect,” said Mathieu Proust, general manager of WeWork UK and Ireland.

The activation also has a customer acquisition angle as WeWork is offering people who are not members of its network the chance to sign up online and visit the pop-up space for a day, as well as use all other facilities in the office space.

WeWork has been working hard on expanding its retail capabilities over the past year. This is the second time it collaborates with the shopping platform on a retail experience, having hosted a similar space in a Miami location last year where all products were sourced from Walmart. Over the summer, it also launched WeMRKT, which sells products made by its members. Lastly in October 2018, it introduced designated Rent the Runway drop-off spots in six major US cities, including New York, Chicago and Miami, in order to facilitate returns to members of both services.

To support the continued expansion of its business ventures, WeWork rebranded as The We Company earlier this week.

How are you thinking about interactive retail experiences? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more

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business data digital snippets e-commerce product social media technology

What you missed: SXSW special, see-now-buy-now’s decline, LVMH’s e-commerce moves, Gucci’s memes

The #TFWGucci meme campaign - weekly round-up Gucci LVMH SXSW
The #TFWGucci meme campaign

There’s a lot to catch up on from the past fortnight – from news of the see-now-buy-now revolution’s fading, to LVMH’s e-commerce plans and Gucci’s meme campaign, not to mention the creative director shifts happening at the likes of Givenchy and Chloé.

On top of that however, is also a special digest of everything you need to know from SXSW – from our own round-up of the top technologies on show and the numerous Levi’s, Marc Jacobs and Bolt Threads announcements, through to varying views on areas including chatbots, drones and more.

If that’s not enough, do also take time to read the much deeper dives on artificial intelligence we’ve highlighted both under the top stories and tech headers too.


TOP STORIES
  • The see-now-buy-now revolution is fizzling [Glossy]
  • LVMH goes digital with all its brands under one luxury goods e-commerce site [FT]
  • #TFWGucci is the new viral campaign merging memes and fashion [Sleek]
  • WWD worked with IBM Watson’s AI to predict the biggest trends of the season [WWD]
  • Why Cosabella replaced its agency with AI and will never go back to humans [Campaign]

SXSW SPECIAL
  • SXSW 2017: Tech takeaways from AI to blockchain for the fashion and retail industries [F&M]
  • Trying on the Levi’s and Google smart jacket at SXSW feels like the future [Forbes]
  • Why Marc Jacobs’ cynical view of fashion and technology at SXSW won’t last [Forbes]
  • Bolt Threads is launching its first bioengineered spider silk product at SXSW – a tie [Forbes]
  • My afternoon at the virtual reality cinema, including trying the Spatium Philip Treacy experience [USA Today]
  • For fashion brands flocking to SXSW, what’s the ROI? [BoF]
  • Spotify lets The North Face release campaign where it rains [BrandChannel]
  • How may AI help you, sir? [Campaign]
  • 4 best practices to make bots the next big user interface [AdAge]
  • Amazon’s delivery drones can be seen at SXSW [Fortune]
  • Fashion and beauty brands are still gaga for Instagram [Glossy]
  • Armani, Neiman Marcus embrace SXSW to appeal to young affluents [Luxury Daily]
  • Neiman Marcus tries see-now-buy-now at SXSW [WWD]
  • Pauline van Dongen’s touch-sensitive denim jacket gives intimate back rubs [Dezeen]

BUSINESS
  • Neiman Marcus reportedly in talks to sell to Hudson’s Bay [Retail Dive]
  • Canada Goose gets a warm reception, extending momentum of IPO market [USA Today]
  • Clare Waight Keller becomes the first female artistic director at Givenchy [The Guardian]
  • Chloé names Natacha Ramsay-Levi as creative director [NY Times]
  • Tom Ford bids farewell to see-now-buy-now [WWD]
  • Thakoon’s business restructuring is a blow to see-now-buy-now [Glossy]
  • M&S, Starbucks, Microsoft and L’Oréal named among world’s most ethical companies [Campaign]
  • Uniqlo thinks faster fashion can help it beat Zara [Bloomberg]
  • One simple way to empower women making H&M clothes in Bangladesh: Stop paying them in cash [Quartz]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Facebook rolls out version of Instagram Stories for Messenger [AdWeek]
  • How brands are innovating on messaging platforms [L2]
  • What a chatbot can teach you – and Unilever – about hair [AdAge]
  • Drop it like its bot: Brands have cooled on chatbots [Digiday]
  • How luxury fashion brands in China use WeChat in 2017 [JingDaily]

MARKETING
  • Marques’Almeida launched an interactive website as its latest campaign [BoF]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Shopify: The invisible selling machine [Fortune]
  • Millennials buy more clothes on Amazon than any other website [Recode]
  • LIKEtoKNOW.it’s app helps you buy the products in your screenshots [TechCrunch]

TECHNOLOGY
  • How AI will make commerce as natural as talking to a friend [LinkedIn]
  • Stitch Fix creates garments using artificial intelligence as more firms seek to develop creative software [WSJ]
  • AI-powered customer service needs the human touch [Huffington Post]
  • Rethinking warehouse fulfillment — with robots [WWD]
  • Sephora is betting big on augmented reality for beauty [Glossy]
  • Walmart launches tech incubator dubbed Store No. 8 [Forbes]
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business digital snippets film product social media technology

What you missed: See-now, buy-now at #NYFW, Levi’s musical roots, Amazon’s fashion ambitions

adidas alexander wang see-now buy-now
Alexander Wang’s surprise Adidas collaboration at New York Fashion Week

With New York Fashion Week well and truly in full swing, the main conversation this past week (and weekend) has been around the whole see-now, buy-now collection strategy from various designers. Alongside that have been the way in which tools like Snapchat and Facebook Live are being used at the shows, as well as the introduction of street style shopping on Google thanks to a new partnership between the search giant and LiketoKnow.It.

Also hitting the headlines has been everything from Ted Baker’s new shoppable film produced by Guy Ritchie to the role music is playing over at Levi’s and a look into Amazon’s fashion ambitions. Don’t forget to check out our full list of upcoming events at the bottom too…


TOP STORIES
  • The complications of ‘see-now-buy-now’ [Glossy]
  • “See-now-buy-now” is New York’s hot new reality show – Suzy Menkes on Thakoon [Vogue]
  • Alexander Wang threw a mini-music festival to celebrate his secret Adidas collab and spring show [Fashionista]
  • Google is making street style fashions shoppable in new LiketoKnow.It partnership [Forbes]
  • Why Levi’s is looking to its musical roots to drive relevance for young consumers [The Drum]

BUSINESS
  • How Tommy Hilfiger is rewiring for fashion immediacy [BoF]
  • Mytheresa.com adds see-now, buy-now collections [WWD]
  • Is Herschel Supply Co. building the first modern luxury empire (right under our noses)? [LeanLuxe]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Gucci sees growth in China with social media sentiment rising [BrandChannel]
  • All the looks from Misha Nonoo’s “live lookbook” on Snapchat [F&M]
  • Vogue uses ‘Runway’ vertical to experiment with live video [Glossy]
  • Refinery29’s fashion week installation is full of Instagram-worthy, interactive art [AdWeek]
  • Snapchat fuels rumours it is creating augmented reality goggles as it joins Bluetooth industry group [The Drum]

ADVERTISING
  • Ted Baker launches shoppable Guy Ritchie film and Google retail partnership [Forbes]
  • H&M launches Lauren Hutton campaign [Elle]

RETAIL
  • Decoding Amazon’s fashion ambitions [BoF]
  • How Macy’s store closures could help Gap [Fortune]
  • Kit and Ace moves to no-cash policy [Detroit Free Press]
  • Big name brands notably absent from Condé Nast’s new fashion retail website [The Drum]
  • The sneaky genius of America’s lenient return policies [Quartz]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Michael Kors brings really, really big design to Android Wear [TechCrunch]
  • Topshop approved: Madison Maxey on smart fabrics beyond LED dresses [Wareable]
  • Death of Apple’s $17,000 gold watch leaves Swiss rivals smiling [Bloomberg]
  • Sewbo claims breakthrough with first robotically sewn garment [The Industry]

UPCOMING EVENTS
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Google is making street style fashions shoppable in new LiketoKnow.It partnership

LiketoKnow.It
Shoppable street style on Google thanks to LiketoKnow.It’s content integration

In today’s social media age there’s an endless stream of content being uploaded across multiple platforms every day. For the 10,000 influencers who use blogger monetization network, rewardStyle and its Instagram shopping tool LiketoKnow.it, there are at least 1,000 daily street style posts being shared on Instagram alone.

Some of those names are the most influential in the fashion game, which not only makes that content increasingly important, but explains why Google GOOGL -0.64% would want to get its hands on it from a search perspective. As it stands, it doesn’t have a way to index any of those images, let alone the information that comes with them – much of what’s on Instagram and indeed on Snapchat or even Pinterest is locked within those platforms.

And so Google has teamed up with LiketoKnow.It to power a new “Shop the Look” tool that pulls in shoppable influencer content. “Google came to us in the spring of this year understanding how much is happening in these closed social channels. It knew if it wanted to be competitive it had to leverage that content,” explains Amber Venz-Box, president and co-founder of rewardStyle.

Head over to Forbes to find out more, including exactly what that means for the user and the specifics of the duo’s additional partnership around fashion week season.

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business e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Misha Nonoo marks consumer-driven fashion week move with shoppable Instagram campaign

mishanonoo

New York designer Misha Nonoo is continuing with her alternative approach to fashion week and launching a shoppable Instagram campaign for the current spring/summer 2016 season.

The images (launching Sunday) will star Nonoo herself, along with Amber Venz-Box, president and co-founder of blogger monetization network, rewardStyle, in a focus on female entrepreneurship.

More importantly however, Venz-Box’s participation is also about using rewardStyle’s LIKEtoKNOW.it mobile platform to actually make the items shown shoppable. For Instagram users signed up to the LIKEtoKNOW.it scheme (just a matter of linking your Instagram account and email address), all they have to do is “like” an item in order to receive an email with links to the relevant e-commerce pages to buy.

The hope for Nonoo of course, is that it encourages her followers to actually purchase rather than just state intention for something that used to be six months away from launch. Traditionally, she would now be showing fall 2016 instead.

This ability to click and buy in real-time, is part of a new shift we’re seeing around fashion weeks at large in a bid for designers to more closely align with consumer demand. Head over to Forbes to read the full story, plus interviews with Nonoo and Venz-Box about what they’re doing, and why this in-season consumer move makes sense for the market.

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Editor's pick social media

Why Instagram influencers matter, and who to follow this fashion week

A version of this post first appeared on The Telegraph.

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Supermodel Kendall Jenner generated 1.5 million likes in 12 hours on Instagram last week for an image of herself wearing Calvin Klein underwear.

An official tie up for the brand’s spring/summer 2016 #mycalvins campaign (which also features pop star Justin Bieber), two further shots she posted, including a video, each gained upward of 900,000 likes within a similar time frame.

Last month she did the same for Mango. Her buddy Gigi Hadid similarly posted shots for Versace and Stuart Weitzman. Cara Delevingne meanwhile, was ‘gramming live from the Chanel couture show.

Brands are increasingly enlisting influencers to help promote their wares on social media in a bid to appeal to new audiences and reach much higher numbers than would be possible through their own accounts. For fashion, Instagram is the playground of choice.

“It’s the ideal platform for fashion because of the fact we’re a completely visual industry,” says Caroline Homlish, a digital strategist who recently launched her own agency following senior positions at Chanel and Alexander McQueen. “In the past you would have flicked through a magazine to see all the editorials and the ads to know what was going on, now you just scroll down.” The beauty of it is being able to discover fashion in real-time, and influencers are really helping to shape that, she says.

“It’s the most democratic platform. Smaller brands like Self Portrait and Mansur Gavriel blew up on Instagram, and that was because of the fact they were being worn by the right sorts of influencers,” she adds.

Indeed, as consumers, 81% of us trust the opinions and recommendations of such individuals (and our friends) over that of a brand, according to research firm Nielsen.

Amber Venz Box, president and co-founder of blogger monetisation network rewardStyle, says Instagram users are increasingly looking for an option to buy what they see. “When you look at the comments on influencer’s photos on Instagram, they are filled with questions from ‘where did you buy that dress’ to ‘what lipstick are you wearing?’ People are always asking about the ready-to-shop information, but bloggers and celebrities almost never have time to respond and people are left to search for the items themselves,” she explains. She created LIKEtoKNOW.it, a service that emails you shoppable links when you like certain tagged looks on your Instagram feed, as a result.

A photo posted by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid) on

But with over 80 million images and 3.5 billion likes hitting Instagram every day, knowing who to follow and who exactly counts as an “influencer” is becoming increasingly complex.

“We are definitely in a much more diverse and diffuse landscape,” says Leila Yavari, fashion director of StyleBop. “Five or 10 years ago, one could easily list five or six [individuals] who were having an impact at any given moment. Today there are so many more of these figures in play across a broad range of platforms and each of them has their own sphere of influence.”

For Homlish, identifying creativity is particularly important in the run up to fashion weeks. During the autumn/winter 2015 shows there were 121,000 images tagged #LFW to wade through. “The problem is, you’re often hard-pressed to find very much that’s interesting from those,” she says. “There are always a lot of blurry runway photos or shots of sets that are now designed to be Instagrammed. It gets very monotonous. Anyone doing something creative with their posts is going to stand out.”

So who’s worth knowing about right now on Instagram? Head over to The Telegraph where a full list of 15 top influencers lives.

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digital snippets e-commerce Editor's pick social media technology

All the digital activity (outside of live streaming) happening this #NYFW

If watching dozens of Hyperlapse videos from day one of New York Fashion Week is already starting to grate, here are some of the other digitally-enabled or tech-themed plans that might appeal instead…

OpeningCeremony_Intel

  • For those in New York looking to explore what else wearables currently offer, it’s worth checking out Chelsea concept store, Story’s new Style.tech installation in partnership with Intel. There’s everything from Ringly to Cute Circuit pieces on show, as well as 3D-printed heels from Continuum and more. It’s open until October 5
  • Back to Rebecca Minkoff, and social media is helping with decision making for tomorrow’s show. The designer posted an Instagram shot featuring two looks from the spring 2015 collection – a printed or an indigo pair of dungarees. The one that got the most likes will walk down the catwalk
  • Tommy Hilfiger is also focusing on social with the announcement of an initiative called First Timers, which will bring together “a diverse group of digital influencers from different fields and areas of expertise outside the fashion industry to document the unique experience of viewing a fashion show for the first time”. More details are reportedly set to follow on that soon
  • BCBG Max Azria meanwhile partnered up with Liketoknow.it to make its new collection shoppable instantly via Instagram today. Followers were encouraged to first sign up to Liketoknow.it and then to ‘like’ any image featuring the LTK link in the caption to receive an email with details of how to buy said piece online. This initiative came together in the end, but was a little confusing initially – reports around the campaign didn’t make it entirely clear the images wouldn’t be posted on the BCBG account but on that of a series of influencers involved. Finding them wasn’t therefore as straightforward as it could have been, although a significant number of them are now all featured on the @liketktit page as well
  • Michael Kors is expanding its All Access Kors social program this season – with behind-the-scenes photographs, in-depth stories on design inspirations and videos of the show all featured on Destination Kors. New for SS15 however is also the announcement of a campaign specific to China-based platforms Weixin and WeChat. Here users will be able to personalise a range of All Access Kors imagery – adding their name or uploading a photo that then becomes a bold silhouette against the New York City skyline. Shaking the phone or swiping the screen then reveals a different silhouette or city angle
  • Last but not least, here’s a particularly fab reminder from Véronique Hyland at The Cut for editors to spare us the typically poor fashion week images on Instagram. “The blurry runway photo is not really, strictly speaking, a picture — anyone who wants to can see better photos instantaneously online. No, the blurry runway shot is a trophy. It says, ‘I came, I saw, I sat front row, within 100 feet of Vanessa Hudgens’,” she writes.
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Digital snippets: Fabergé, Dior, Gucci, Marc by Marc Jacobs, H&M, J.Crew and Kate Spade

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech:

 

  • Fabergé’s NYC Easter egg hunt marks the largest Beacon deployment ever in the US [Fashionista]
  • Dior explores global flower sourcing with interactive map [Luxury Daily]
  • James Franco directs video for Gucci (as above) [WWD]
  • Marc by Marc Jacobs line crowdsources models with #castmemarc campaign on social [Vogue.co.uk]
  • YouTube fashion viral: Miranda Kerr is selfie obsessed in H&M’s spring 2014 campaign [Fashionotes]
  • J.Crew and Kate Spade to foster the next big fashion tech start-ups through new accelerator program [Co.Design]
  • IMG Fashion’s partnership with Tencent aims to boost Fashion Week China exposure  [JingDaily] bit.ly/1ltgJFZ
  • Fashion in the age of Instagram [NY Times]
  • How iBeacon and similar technology will change retail [eMarketer]
  • Five examples of how marketers are using iBeacons [Econsultancy]
  • ‘Showrooming’ hits luxury fashion – lack of e-commerce presence means clients buying elsewhere online [WSJ]
  • Luxury brands are stupid to snub the internet [BusinessWeek]
  • Decoded Fashion founder: ‘Designers need to launch like start-ups’ [The Guardian]
  • New app, Think Dirty, tracks the nasty chemicals in the beauty products you put on your face [Co.Exist]
  • The camera-wielding boyfriends behind fashion’s most famous bloggers [Fashionista]
  • How LiketoKnow.it is changing Instagram by monetising your photos [Pinetop Group]
  • Op-ed: The companies with the best software will lead fashion [BoF]