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Prada, McQueen, Lanvin, Belstaff, Miu Miu launch SS14 campaign films

miu-miu-spring-2014-campaign

It’s been a bumper start to the week in terms of spring/summer 2014 film releases. Here are five of the big ones:

  1. Prada

    Prada’s spot sees a bevy of models all acting as spectators at various different events – tennis, the cinema and a gig – so that shortly you realise they, in fact, are the spectacle. It was shot by Steven Meisel.

  2. Alexander McQueen

    Alexander McQueen’s short film is a haunting narrative starring Kate Moss as an otherworldly woman with sulphur yellow hair. Captured by Steven Klein, it follows the model as she is eerily being filmed by a tatooed stranger. A voodoo doll version of her can also be seen in the spot, and replicated in the print ads.

  3. Belstaff

    Belstaff’s relationship with David Beckham makes headway with a 90-second spot set in the English countryside. The star is seen zipping through fields on a motorcycle alongside friends “with a shared thirst for adventure”. It was shot by Hopi Allard, while the full campaign was captured by Peter Lindbergh.

  4. Lanvin

    Lanvin has captured sounds from its spring/summer shoot and overlaid them on its seasonal campaign film. Whisperings such as: “I think it is one of the most exceptional things I’ve ever tried,” and: “It’s my finest work,” can all be heard. Steven Meisel is also behind this one, with creative direction from House and Holme’s Ronnie Newhouse and Stephen Wolstenholme.

  5. Miu Miu

    Miu Miu’s is a personal favourite. Launched at the end of last week, it stars young actresses Elle Fanning, Bella Heathcote, Lupita Nyong’o and Elizabeth Olsen in what’s referred to as a “techno interpretation of the SS14 collection”. Inspired by video game speed and sounds, it was directed by Inez & Vinoodh, and edited by Otto Arsenault.

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Spring films arrive from Lanvin, Calvin Klein and David Beckham Bodywear for H&M

It’s been a bit of a week for fashion film releases, with highlights coming in from Lanvin, Calvin Klein and H&M surrounding the spring/summer 2013 campaigns.

 

Lanvin, a firm favourite every season thanks to the genius of creative director Alber Elbaz, has unveiled a spot that seems as though it’s just focusing on the print shoot in action. The models are each seen posing in beautiful surrounds very calmly, before suddenly a Skype call comes in from Elbaz who was unable to get to New York due to Hurricane Sandy.

What follows is highly amusing commentary from him on the “sick perspective” and “beautiful lighting” of the campaign. “It’s very very poetic, very chic,” he says. “There’s something very Californian about [it]… You know I’m still at the office. I feel I’m in a dream, I feel I’m in a cloud.”

 

Calvin Klein meanwhile, followed its Super Bowl underwear spot with the rest of its spring/summer campaign. Actor Alexander Skarsgård and model Suvi Koponen both star in its film, Provocations, which sees the men’s and women’s Calvin Klein Collection, ck Calvin Klein and Calvin Klein Jeans brands all brought together for the first time. There are three variations of it available: 10 minutes, 60 seconds and 30 seconds (above).

Shot on location in California by Fabien Baron of Baron + Baron, it focuses on recurring elements of fire, air and water as the pair are seen in a variety of “sleek, architectural settings to dark and mysterious milieus”.

 

And H&M roped in film director Guy Ritchie to shoot David Beckham in his first video spot for the retailer. The ad sees Beckham chasing after his family car after his bathrobe gets stuck in the door. As he runs / jumps / swims through the Beverly Hills neighbourhood he continues to lose other items of clothing remaining in just the boxers from his Bodywear line.

“David makes the perfect leading man,” said Ritchie. “For me this felt more than a campaign; it was like directing a short film.”

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Archive Lanvin film reveals founder at work in atelier

 

Lanvin has released another video of its founder Jeanne Lanvin, this time at work supervising fittings and making final adjustments on her collection before its unveiling to the press.

The historical, recently-discovered footage shows the designer, who lived from 1867 to 1946, busy with the last-minute preparations at 22 Faubourg Saint Honoré, which remains the flagship store of the brand today.

A beautiful glimpse into fashion history, it documents the launch of her “Sorbier”, “Tubéreuse” and “Azalée” eveningwear designs. It also provides a look inside her office. “This is not just a dressmaking studio; it is a veritable cabinet of curiosities furnished by the famous Eugène Printz and houses her fabric library,” read the notes.

The notes also suggest films resurfacing from the founder’s era such as this one are “thanks to the digitalisation of cinematic archives by companies such as INA or Gaumont-Pathé”.

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Digital snippets: Isaac Mizrahi, Lanvin, Helmut Lang, Lady Gaga, Vogue

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Isaac Mizrahi to sell fashion line exclusively on LivingSocial [Mashable]
  • Lanvin reveals new campaign film starring real models from print ads (as above) [Fashionista]
  • Helmut Lang launches guest blogging series [WWD]
  • How to make a perfume ad go viral: just be Lady Gaga [AdAge]
  • Product videos nudge apparel shoppers toward register [eMarketer]
  • Vogue mines intel from 2,000 fashion-focused females with virtual focus group, Style Society [AdWeek]
  • Le Book selects fashion videos for New York Film Festival next spring [Vogue.co.uk]
  • Infographic: for brand engagament, visuals rule [Mashable]
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Lanvin turns to stop motion to animate decadent models in SS12 campaign film

Despite a lot to live up to following the success of its Pitbull-backed dancing short last season, Lanvin has managed to outdo itself in the video stakes for spring/summer 2012, this time with a stop motion spot shot once again by Steven Meisel.

It stars models Aaron Vernon, Angus Low, Aymeline Valade, Johannes Schulze, Marte Mei van Haaster, and Othilia Simon.

Set around a somewhat debauched dinner table complete with snakes, it ties together images of the group by animating them to the tune of Maxine Ashley’s ‘Cookieman’, produced by Pharrell Williams.

Watch it below:

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Video: Merry Lanvin Christmas!

A very cute film to celebrate the unveiling of the Lanvin & Claridge’s Christmas tree:

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e-commerce mobile social media

Brazil’s new luxury focus: IHT #hotlux and more in summary

Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been completely and utterly engrossed in both attending and then writing up everything from the International Herald Tribune’s annual Luxury conference, which was held this year in São Paulo.

I was lucky enough while I was there to spend a few extra days immersing myself in everything to do with how the fashion / retail industry operates – meeting with everyone from ad agencies and local brand owners, to publishers, editors, bloggers and sales assistants. I was blown away.

Here’s an attempt at summarising everything I learnt:

Rising middle class and growth of luxury brands

  • Brazil has a rising middle class. There are currently 100m people considered in this category, up from 50m less than five years ago. By 2014, Carlos Jereissati, CEO of Iguatemi, says there will be 120m, or 60% of the population. That’s a lot of growth.

  • That and the fact the country has a new sense of economic stability – 7.5% growth in 2010 –  remaining relatively unscathed while Europe and the US have weakened in the global crisis, means the luxury industry is thriving here. And the country’s presence on the global stage is only set to increase further as the eyes of the world turn to it in 2014 and 2016 for the FIFA World Cup and Olympics respectively.

  • Having said that, São Paulo is the first major city I’ve been to in the world where I don’t recognise most of the stores along the street. In fact, in the malls – where most of the true luxury sits – only 25% of the space currently belongs to international brands. Local designers still rule the roost. But although local consumers are rightfully very attached to that fact, they’re also pushing for more and more of the fashion world on their doorstep.

  • Next year will see two new shopping centres: one from JHFS, Cidade’s Jardim group, and another from Iguatemi, the JK mall. International stores are headed out in droves to the latter including: Lanvin, Prada, Dolce & Gabbana, not to mention the first Topshop Brazil.

  • A couple of other specific cases: Gucci is planning to have 25 stores in Latin America by the end of 2012. Diane von Furstenberg’s store in São Paulo’s Iguatemi mall is her second most successful in the world, after New York. Sarah Burton of Alexander McQueen had never before been to Brazil but held meetings while in town for the conference to discuss opening a store there soon. Coach will open its first store in Brazil in the new JK mall next spring, but has plans to quickly increase to up to seven stores. CEO Lew Frankfort says he estimates the market to be worth up to $350m per year to them.

Complicated and expensive

  • It’s a highly complex market though. There isn’t a culture of multi-brand stores, for instance, the result of sky-high import taxes restricting a regular wholesale model. Most designers entering the market therefore have to do so by opening own-brand stores. Needless to say, that’s quite a risk in what could still be referred to as unknown territory.

  • With those import taxes through the roof, everything in Brazil is expensive, not least the fashion. But people still buy. There is an overwhelming desire for access to international labels no matter what the price is. Some stores, like Zara, are getting round this however by also producing in the country. There’s likely to become more of this, although it’s currently the exception rather than the rule.

  • An interesting fact: shoppers in Brazil buy on credit; deferred payments in two to three installments is absolutely the norm. According to a few people I spoke to, it provides a false sense of security – they don’t see what they’ve bought as the total price, but rather as the individual installment prices.

Lacking fast fashion but digitally savvy

  • In amongst all this new luxury, fast fashion as we know it doesn’t really exist. One couple I spoke to – admittedly both of whom work in the industry and both of whom travel often – buy when they’re abroad. They raid Topshop and H&M and otherwise only spend occasionally when they’re in Brazil. When they do, it’s inevitably on expensive items, but they see these as likely to last. Investment pieces.

  • Local stores such as Marisa, who are turning to this faster fashion route, feel it is necessary to educate the middle class consumer they’re targeting. These shoppers are not used to buying ‘fashion’ nor are they used to thinking about ‘trends’, the store’s ad agency explained to me. A heavy proportion of marketing therefore is based around advice, hints and tips.

  • The only thing fast about fashion in Brazil is the response seen when actors in the infamous soap operas wear items or bloggers post about them. Where they go, the market follows. Simple.

  • Given this is a digital blog, it’s also worth noting this is one of the most digitally savvy consumer markets there is. Period. In fact, I’ve never seen such obsessions with Twitter, Foursquare and Facebook (or local site Orkut).

  • One in three Brazilians is currently online, and they spend an average of nine hours connected, said Jessica Michault, online style editor of the International Herald Tribune. Real growth is set to follow however as the internet infrastructure improves – things are currently being put in place on a national scale to enable widespread broadband access for instance.

E-commerce versus service

  • What’s interesting though, is the complete lack of e-commerce acceptance there is in the marketplace so far. Why? In the main part, because of customer service. I have never seen anything like it – not only do the shop assistants actually speak nicely to you, but everyone is treated like a VIP. Suzy Menkes, fashion editor of the IHT, told a great story at the conference about Tom Ford saying his role model for service in opening his first New York store was Brazil’s most upmarket one, Daslu.

  • On top of the service aspect however, consumers in Brazil are used to shopping as a truly social experience. Friends hit the mall in groups, and they continue it back at home, trying on outfits, sharing with others and getting ready en masse ahead of a night out. The interesting thing is, this isn’t restricted to a teenage activity; women of all ages reportedly partake.

  • Combining this service and social aspect means two things then: brands coming into this market will really have to up their game (it’ll be interesting to see what Topshop does), but so too will the e-commerce experience need to evolve to get this consumer truly on board. Thinking bigger picture, you could say e-commerce is likely to follow once some marrying between service, bloggers and fast-fashion occurs. There’s definitely business opportunity there.

And finally…

  • My favourite quote from IHT, came from Diane von Furstenburg. She said: “If Brazilians could put their joie de vivre in a bottle, it would be bigger than Coca-Cola’s”. Just about says it all, not to mention summarises my trip.

  • On a truly final note, if you haven’t checked out the local activation of Puma’s After Hours campaign in São Paulo, you should. Run by the team behind by the Brazilian edition of Vice magazine and its counterpart agency Virtue, it’s a brilliant example of turning global creative into experiences specifically relevant to the market at hand. It did so with a variety of events throughout the year that transformed regular nightclubs into old fashioned social clubs; offering games and sports such as table tennis, snooker, darts and more. The outcome was so successful, it opened its own fully operational bar for three months. If you’re visiting, be sure to stop by, it’s there until December 23, 2011.

Enormous thanks to my incredible friend, and tour guide, @carolalt

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A pick of the best AW11/12 campaign films

Amid the fasion week madness, here’s a little respite with a highlight of 10 of the best autumn/winter 2011/12 campaign films:

1. Lanvin’s madcap dancers

2. Mulberry’s CGI woodland feast

3. Hermès by Nick Knight

4. Vanessa Bruno’s haunting yet beautiful portrayal of Kate Bosworth

5. Dior Homme’s The Wanderer, an eerie depiction of an isolated surburbia

6. Alexander Wang’s dark tale in an abandoned Brooklyn grain factory

7. Miu Miu’s Muta, the second film in its Women’s Tales series

8. Donna Karan’s The Power of a Woman

9. Emanuel Ungaro’s Cinq à Sept by Ruth Hogben

10. Mugler’s Gaga / Zombie boy collaboration

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Lanvin proves fashion has dance moves in latest campaign video

In case anyone missed it, here is the very funny autumn/winter 2011/12 campaign video from Lanvin.

Shot by Steven Meisel, it features the likes of supermodels Raquel Zimmermann and Karen Elson pulling off a series of so-bad-they’re-brilliant dance moves to Pitbull’s I Know You Want Me.

Look out for creative director Alber Elbaz’s cameo at the end too:

 

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Lanvin chief’s email-free Wednesdays

Love this: Lanvin chief Thierry Andretta, has declared Wednesdays email-free.

Having a full day without interruption reportedly helps him concentrate. He implemented the initiative earlier this year after feeling increasingly depressed and frustrated by the  volume of emails he was expected to handle each day, reports Reuters.

“Generally, I think we have become too accessible. We all lose too much time reading and writing emails and they prevent you from thinking clearly,” he said on the fringe of the FT Luxury Summit in Lausanne, Switzerland earlier this week.

He explained how he would frequently clear his inbox before flying from Paris to New York, but have another 250 messages waiting for him by the time he arrived.

Perhaps needless to say, there’s not been a huge amount of uptake from the rest of the employees at the luxury brand.

“I think they are not really interested but it might be also because they get fewer emails than me,” Andretta said.

Jean-Claude Biver, chief executive of luxury watch brand Hublot, however, said Andretta’s idea was nice but unrealistic and impractical. “The one who can allow himself not to read or answer emails during an entire day in a working week indulges in real luxury,” he told Reuters.