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Kering commits to carbon neutrality, retail surveillance, Instagram supports drop model

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

Top Stories
  • Kering commits to carbon neutrality (Drapers)
  • The new ways retailers are watching you shop (BoF)
  • Instagram launches ‘reminders’ to support product drops (Vogue Business)
Technology
  • Boston Dynamics robot dog Spot is going on sale for the first time (MIT Technology Review)
  • Cryptocurrency’s huge potential in China’s luxury retail (Jing Daily)
  • Kraft Heinz brings mobile-activated packaging to Walmart (Mobile Marketer)
  • Oculus eclipses $100million in VR content sales (TechCrunch)
  • Amazon to launch smart home inventory sensors (Retail Dive)
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Burt’s Bees and National Geographic partner for climate campaign (Fashion Network)
  • Can Stella McCartney make faux fur sustainable? (Vogue)
  • M&S and Tesco take top spots in climate change report ranking (Retail Gazette)
  • Taylor Stitch garment restored in Restitch’s workwear capsule (Sourcing Journal)
  • LVMH gets competitive about sustainability (BoF)
  • UK government moves to end ‘vague and misleading’ bioplastic terminology (Dezeen)
  • Clean jeans are the future of denim (Vogue Business)
  • Peta launches campaign to get Farfetch to ban angora (Fashion Network)
  • DPD inks sustainable contract with Asos (Drapers)
  • ‘No planet, no sports’ says Nike Sustainability Chief (Sourcing Journal)
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
BUSINESS
  • Forever 21 files for Bankruptcy (Bloomberg)
  • Ebay CEO steps down (Retail Dive)
  • Rent the Runway executive steps down after delivery failures (BoF)
  • Marks & Spencer’s director of supply chain & logistics departs (Drapers)
  • Boohoo interim revenues up by 43% as annual sales break £1bn (The Industry)
  • Calvin Klein names Nadege Winter SVP brand experience (Fashion Network)
  • Boohoo appoints Missguided brand boss as MissPap CEO (Drapers)
  • British manufacturing: back in fashion (The Guardian)
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • MAC Cosmetics targets gamers with TwitchCon sponsorship (Glossy)
  • Walmart challenges TikTok users to share dance moves (Mobile Marketer)
  • Honda debuts animated comic book on social media (Mobile Marketer)
  • Oculus introduces social virtual reality world Facebook horizon (Adweek)
  • Facebook tries hiding like counts to fight envy (TechCrunch)
PRODUCT
  • Reebok and Adidas collaborate to launch Instapump fury boost (Fashion Network)
  • Amazon expands Alexa with voice-powered wearable (Mobile Marketer)
  • Amazon fashion teams with Puma on new athleisure brand (BoF)
  • Selfridges partners with British CBD body and wellness start-up Grass & Co (Fashion Network)
  • Nestle launches luxury KitKat bars in direct-to-consumer move (Campaign)
  • Diesel partners Coca-Cola for eco-savvy clothing range (Campaign)
  • Amazon pushes further into healthcare with Amazon Care (Adweek)
CULTURE
  • Indian women are Youtube-ing their way out of gender stereotypes (Quartzy)
  • Rebecca Minkoff on the business of representation (Glossy)
  • Mattel release line of gender-neutral world dolls (Adweek)
  • Avon can’t escape lawsuit accusing it of discriminating against pregnant women (Fashion Law)

How are you thinking about innovation? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more.

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business Campaigns Editor's pick sustainability

From G7 to fashion weeks – why the industry needs to cut the sustainable chat and take action

One minute we’re talking all about saving the planet, the next, it’s onto the indulgence and excess of fashion weeks. No wonder there’s so much questioning around what the industry is about right now. 

At the G7 Summit last month, François-Henri Pinault, chairman and CEO of luxury group Kering, introduced the Fashion Pact, a deal that saw 32 brands from Adidas to Prada, coming together to commit to stopping global warming, restoring biodiversity and protecting the oceans. 

The initiative was mandated by French President Emmanuel Macron, who asked the industry to set practical objectives for reducing its environmental impact.

Practical is the keyword here. While collaboration between so many different players is in itself great progress, reflections on many of the goals are that they have been light on detail as to how they’re going to be achieved. 

Meanwhile, as has been pointed out by others this past fortnight, fashion week season has kicked off and we’re back into that completely contrasting feeling of celebration and excess once more. “Fashion month is a party,” Orsola de Castro, co-founder and creative director of non-profit Fashion Revolution, told the Business of Fashion. “It’s huge fun, but it’s the kind of fun that is no longer funny.” 

Within that is of course the volume of waste and climate impact generated from the shows themselves, but in addition, the culture of consumerism they continue to feed.  

In London we have Extinction Rebellion protesting against the very existence of fashion week itself, while in New York, the biggest stories have conversely been about the large-scale theatrics of shows from the likes of Tommy Hilfiger and Rihanna’s Savage x Fenty. Let’s not forget, fashion weeks are about marketing – appealing to buyers, press and consumers individually to encourage them to buy and buy-into the new collections in one or other of their relative ways. 

By their very nature, they therefore clash with a more sustainable approach to supply and demand. All of which makes one question how much hot air really surrounds the topic of sustainability – no matter how much it’s “trending” – when looking across the industry at large. 

Back to the G7 pact and the biggest question that sits there then, is how will any of these promises turn into reality? As in, literally what are the methodologies behind them? 

The fact is, what we really need is less talk more doing. To put it into the simplest terms, the contradiction of fashion week doesn’t sit well with the notion of ‘actions speaking louder than words’. But neither do promises that aren’t backed by some tangible outputs to follow. 

The same goes for the sheer volume of broader sustainable pledges being made by the industry. Everywhere you turn you see promises to use 100% renewable energy by 2020, to become carbon neutral by 2022, to reduce water consumption by 2025. The same can be said for chemicals, materials, recycling, waste… the list goes on. 

That’s all well and good, but only if progress towards those things actually happen. On our side, we’re tracking them all, and the list of promises is growing at a substantially faster rate than that of the actions being made in response. This is absolutely key. It means that currently the announcements are serving in the main as PR initiatives – a way of hiding behind something that is several years away, or about buying time while you figure out what to actually do. 

The result is that we either have too many pledges that risk not being met, or those offering too little too late – such as to be carbon neutral by 2050. In Greta Thunberg’s words, this is a climate emergency

Last year, Fast Company reviewed various environmental goals set for 2020 by large corporations as well as countries, questioning which of them were on target to actually be met in time. It reads like a mixed bag, though does demonstrate progress in parts. 

The same can be said for fashion. Kering itself has always been one of the most vocal about its goals, setting them out in 2012, then reporting back on what it had and hadn’t achieved in 2016. It reset its targets in 2017 with a broader 2025 sustainability strategy in line with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Included in that was cutting the group’s carbon emissions by 50% and reducing its overall environmental impact by at least 40%. Not small aims. An update is expected in 2020. 

H&M is another that’s always gone big. It’s reportedly on target to hit its goals of both using 100% organic or recycled cotton, and eliminating hazardous chemicals in its production, by 2020. Future aims include becoming climate positive by 2040. 

The difficulty with all this is the sliding scale of what attaining such goals mean, not to mention how they’re measured. 

One of the ones I have the biggest issue with in the industry broadly is the idea of moving to entirely “sustainable cotton” by 2025. This isn’t so much in the goal itself by any means, but in the naming of it. What is sustainable cotton? Strictly speaking, most of the time what we’re talking about is rather “better” cotton. As in, it is literally better for the environment than that which is otherwise farmed in the conventional manner. Usually this falls under those certified via the Better Cotton Initiative and others including Organic and Fair Trade. 

This sort of language use is critical because of how misleading it can be to the consumer. It instantly gives the impression that fast fashion, like Zara as well, for instance, will be absolutely fine by 2025 because the materials used will indeed be entirely sustainable. Not true. They’ll just be less bad at that early part of the supply chain. Arguably, that’s not enough. 

The same goes for what is the lesser of two evils when we hear certain companies have managed to achieve zero waste to landfill targets, yet are continuing to incinerate items. Does the ban on incineration in France mean landfill will then be on the up? 

When it comes to greenhouse gases, there was a feeling in a recent meeting I had with some members of UK parliament, that regulation for companies to declare their emissions makes the industry immediately more accountable.

What didn’t seem to be acknowledged is that the fashion industry doesn’t know the true numbers around its emissions. As I’ve written about before, it’s not completely possible right now because there is simply not enough accurate information out there for it to report this – and it doesn’t have direct control of its supply chain in the majority of cases to discover any of it itself further. 

We know this from our work with Google to build a tool that shines a light on the raw materials stage of the supply chain – Tier 4. What’s available right now is at best globalized averages, at worst, completely unknown. The result, therefore, is guesswork. How for instance can H&M become climate positive in a true sense, if it can’t trace back the impact it is actually having? It can’t. You can apply the same to Burberry, to Nike, to whoever else you like.

A few years back there were headlines about 2020 being the “magic year for fashion” based on the industry embracing sustainability. Arguably, even in the midst of fashion week season, that has already happened. But it doesn’t mean anything if it’s just being talked about.  

Change can only take place if these goals become tangible. That’s our entire mantra as a business – drive transformation by enabling action. Enough with the pledges therefore, what we’d rather see is the industry diving deep, staying quiet, building new solutions and starting to show us some results. 

How are you thinking about sustainability? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more.

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business digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media Startups sustainability technology

ICYMI: France to stop burning clothes, inside product recommendations, the role of automation in retail

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • France to end disposal of $900 million in unsold goods each year [NY Times]
  • Inside the multi-billion-dollar online product recommendation economy [BoF]
  • Automation in retail: an executive overview for getting ready [McKinsey]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Amazon’s Bezos says robotic hands will be ready for commercial use in next 10 years [Fashion Network]
  • Can technology keep fake handbags out of the marketplace? [Fashionista]
  • Beyond the data breach: How retail is addressing cybersecurity [Retail Dive]
  • Can “drone delivery” technology make your skincare more effective? [Vogue]
  • Apple introduces ‘sign in with Apple’ to help protect your privacy [Tech Crunch]
  • Prada’s Lorenzo Bertelli sees startups as path to innovation [Vogue Business]
  • Amazon rolls out AR lipstick try-ons via L’Oréal’s ModiFace [Mobile Marketer]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Can Kering grow and be sustainable at the same time? [BoF]
  • The beauty industry’s having an environmental awakening, but not all redemption is created equal [Refinery29]
  • Those tiny hotel toiletry bottles are on their way out [NYT]
  • Gap Inc. to source all cotton from sustainable sources by 2025 [Fashion Network]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Ikea is transitioning its print catalog to Pinterest [Digiday]
  • McDonald’s and Disney top first-ever brand audio rankings [Campaign]
  • Is China ready for LGBTQI marketing? [BoF]
  • Is WeChat’s new social commerce feature a game changer [Jing Daily]
BUSINESS
  • Retailer Revolve gets 2018’s third-best U.S. trading debut [Yahoo]
  • The RealReal files for IPO [Retail Dive]
  • Topshop named mostly like to join ‘retail graveyard’ [Drapers]
  • The Modist secures investments from Farfetch and Nicola Bulgari [Harpers Bazaar]
  • Louis Vuitton sees ‘unheard-of’ growth in China [BoF]
  • Lacoste owner buys The Kooples [Drapers]
  • How China tariffs could make your sweaters and pants cost more [BoF]
CULTURE
  • Catwalk cover-up: how the west is falling for modest fashion [The Guardian]
  • Miley Cyrus takes a stand for reproductive rights with Marc Jacobs [Vogue]
  • ‘The models have bellies, hips and thighs that jiggle’: the rise of body-positive swimwear [The Guardian]
  • The Nike London flagship now has plus-sized mannequins [Teen Vogue]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

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Editor's pick sustainability technology

Kering launches interactive EP&L for World Environment Day

To mark World Environment Day on June 5, Kering launched a digital, interactive version of its 2018 Environmental Profit and Loss (EP&L) report.

Kering’s annual EP&L was originally launched in 2011. It allows the group to measure its environmental footprint across its internal business operations, business activities and supply chain.

The new report is accessible on a dedicated digital platform. This is divided into four different sections, two of which allow data from the 2018 EP&L to be visualized in different interactive formats. The third allows users to download all of the raw material aggregate data Kering used to create the report, while the fourth provides access to the full methodology.

Together, these four sections create unprecedented access into Kering’s sustainable strategy.  

“Sharing the underlining EP&L data will complement the methodology we open-sourced in 2015 to further help other companies gain greater transparency of their supply chains and clarify their impact on the environment,” said Marie-Claire Daveu, chief sustainability officer and head of international institutional affairs at Kering.  

Kering’s hope for this new EP&L is also that industry players will be able to build on the data and create their own environmental analysis reports.

In more detail, the first section, called 2018 results, displays the environmental impact insights that were gathered and displayed on the original report in an interactive map format. This allows users to visualize how different environmental impact factors, such as greenhouse gas emissions and land use, impact different geographical locations in which Kering operates.

Through a filter function, users can further customize searches. For example, they can narrow down specific raw materials they are interested in, as well as different product categories such as “couture” or “jewelry”.

Kering’s EP&L “2018 results” map visual

The second category, Material Intensities, allows users to visualize the impact of specific materials in graph format. Again, the data can be customized by using a filter function that allows users to find out very specific information on material type, process step and country.

The third allows users to access and download the raw aggregate datasets that form the backbone of the interactive functionality of the report. These can again be customized to suit the search requirements of a user, they can also be analyzed and then downloaded.

Simultaneously to Kering launching its new EP&L, daughter brand Gucci has also launched its adapted EP&L report in the same interactive format, the first of the Kering brands to do so.

The group aims to further augment the report in October 2019 with a Hackathon in Paris. Inspired by Kering’s successful implementation of its “My P&L app”, this will invite tech experts, sustainability specialists and developers,  to build out apps and other digital solutions.

“Our Hackathon will leverage this data to innovate new tech solutions, which will undoubtedly support us in achieving our 40% EP&L reduction target,” comments Marie-Claire Daveu. “I hope this will also encourage a broader adoption of the resulting tools to facilitate the reduction of luxury and fashion’s impact on the environment and on biodiversity.”

How are you thinking about your sustainable innovation strategy? Want to learn more about how we worked with Google? The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to hear more.

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business digital snippets e-commerce Editor's pick product Retail social media sustainability technology Uncategorized

ICYMI: ‘Sustainability’ arrives in annual reports, Prada goes fur-free, a lack of female fashion CEOs

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week. 

TOP STORIES
  • Tracking sustainability’s rise as one of fashion’s favourite words [Vogue Business]
  • Prada is the latest brand to go fur-free [Dazed]
  • Fashion has shockingly few female CEOs [Quartz]
  • What’s stopping the fashion industry from agreeing on climate action? [BoF]
  • E-Commerce giant Alibaba to integrate blockchain into intellectual property system [Yahoo]
TECHNOLOGY
  • World’s first digital only blockchain clothing sells for $9,500 [Forbes]
  • San Francisco becomes the first US city to ban government facial recognition [Wired]
  • AI avatars could be the next generation’s favorite entertainers [TNW]
  • Driverless electric truck starts deliveries on Swedish public road [FashionNetwork]
  • Future smart clothes will keep you the perfect temperature at all times [Digital Trends]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • How charitable are fashion’s biggest companies? [Vogue Business]
  • The young activists fighting to ‘rebrand’ air pollution [Dazed]
  • Walmart agrees to power more than 40 stores with solar energy [Bloomberg]
  • Kering sets new animal welfare guidelines [FashionUnited]
  • The Body Shop launches fair trade recycled plastic scheme [i-D]
  • Single-use plastics a serious climate change hazard, study warns [Guardian]
  • Scientists devise ‘breakthrough’ plastic that can be recycled again and again [Sourcing Journal]
  • Why Russia still loves fur [Vogue Business]
  • This clothing brand’s new repair program shows that the future of fashion can be circular [Fast Company]
RETAIl & E-COMMERCE
  • How department stores are using services to convince customers they’re still convenient places to shop [Digiday]
  • Urban Outfitters tries to stay relevant with an $88 monthly rental service [Fast Company]
  • Walmart’s ambitious plan to beat Amazon on free one-day shipping is here [Fast Company]
  • Why online fashion retailers are experimenting with invite-only access [Forbes]
  • Klarna announces first UK immersive pop-up [FashionUnited]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Calvin Klein apologizes following “queerbaiting” accusations for Bella Hadid & Lil Miquela ad [Hype Bae]
  • Nike runs shoppable Snapchat lens to support women’s soccer [Mobile Marketer]
  • How will in-game advertising change as Google, Facebook, Snap and Apple level up? [Mobile Marketer]
PRODUCT
  • So what does Rihanna’s first Fenty collection actually look like? [NY Times]
  • PrettyLittleThing launches recycled collection [Drapers]
  • Vivobarefoot launches plant-based shoe [FashionUnited]
BUSINESS
  • Body Shop owner to buy Avon for £1.6bn [BBC]
  • Topshop is closing all its US stores [Refinery29]
  • Farfetch revenue soars [Drapers]
  • Richemont profit misses estimates on online investment costs [BoF]
  • Nike, Adidas and others call on Trump to remove footwear from tariff list [RetailDive]
CULTURE
  • ‘I want to tilt the lens’ – Sinéad Burke’s fight to make fashion more diverse [Guardian]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

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Everything you need to know from the Copenhagen Fashion Summit

The fashion industry’s largest and most influential event dedicated to sustainability took place in Copenhagen last week, with it bringing a flurry of new technology tools, company pledges and product announcements.

Heavy hitters including François-Henri Pinault, CEO of Kering, and Emanuel Chirico, CEO of PVH, took to the Copenhagen Fashion Summit stage to share their stance on development needed in the industry. The former has recently been hired by France President Emmanuel Macron to create a “coalition” of CEOs in fashion to unite and agree on ambitious sustainability objectives together. Chirico meanwhile talked to the investment needed for long-term gains.

Top of the list of news from the week otherwise was our announcement with Google to collaborate with Stella McCartney to build-out a data analytics and machine learning tool that will enable fashion brands to make more responsible sourcing decisions.

Here’s everything else you need to know…

TOP STORIES
  • Google and Current Global collaborate with Stella McCartney to launch sustainable fashion pilot [The Current Daily]
  • Macron hires Kering CEO to improve sustainability of luxury fashion [Euronews]  
  • Sustainability to become ‘requirement of doing business’ says PVH chief [BoF]
  • In search of a business case for sustainability [BoF]
  • Sustainability is linked to privilege – teasing out the truths from Copenhagen Fashion Summit [Forbes]
INNOVATION
  • Parley for the Oceans to announce Parley ID labels to identify garment composition [WWD]
  • Alyx introduces blockchain tag detailing the origin and authenticity of garments [Current Daily]
  • Can these innovators turn the tide of fashion’s pollution mess? [Forbes]  
PLEDGES
  • Kering introduces animal welfare standards [Eco Textile News]
  • LVMH announces signature of a five-year partnership with UNESCO to support Man and Biosphere (MAB) biodiversity program [LVMH]
  • Asics sustainability report displays progress [Eco Textile News]
  • Pandora joins industry discussion on circular fashion at Copenhagen Fashion Summit [Pandora]
CIRCULARITY
  • Fixing one of fashion’s biggest issues: Leading organizations partner to launch new manifesto on circularity [PR News]
  • Nike creates circular design guide [Current Daily]
  • France says it will ban the burning of unsold luxury items [Teen Vogue]
  • P&G’s Lenor launches call to action at Copenhagen Fashion Summit to address throw away fashion trend [Retail Times]
  • Euratex to design for circular economy in textiles [Fibre2Fashion]
PRODUCT
  • Nike and A-COLD-WALL: Can Good Design Be Sustainable? [Highsnobiety]
  • H&M launches upcycling sustainability program for Weekday [Retail Gazette]
  • Clothing hanger brand Arch & Hook makes the functional sexy and sustainable [WWD]
  • A future world – Watch a trance-like film about the making of Nike’s futuristic leather [Dazed Digital]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: LVMH confirms Rihanna label, a business climate emergency, streetwear drives hardware innovation

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Rihanna and LVMH confirm fashion label [BoF]
  • Businesses should declare their own climate emergency. Here’s how [Wired]
  • How streetwear is driving innovation in hardware [Hypebeast]         
  • Inside the world of liquidated Amazon merchandise [Forbes]    
TECHNOLOGY
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Start-ups hoping to fight climate change struggle as other tech firms cash in [NYT]
  • Why the new Harrods charity shop is an ode to sustainable fashion [Euronews]
  • Going zero waste is a lot of work. Most of it is falling to women. [Vox]
RETAIl & E-COMMERCE
  • Nordstrom’s NYC flagship merges open space with hidden tech [Vogue Business]
  • Farfetch signals growing ambitions in resale [BoF]
  • Crocs opens interactive concept store in London [Fashion United]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Net-a-porter Rethinks Content and Video, Shrinks Porter Magazine [WWD]
  • Instagram launches its own e-commerce account [Fashion United]
PRODUCT
  • Sneakers, small accessories and Off-White rule as latest Lyst Index is released [Fashion Network]
  • Kylie Jenner announces skin-care brand on Instagram [WWD]
  • H&M links with Netflix for Stranger Things collection [Fashion Network]
BUSINESS
  • Kering’s shopping list should include these brands [BoF]
  • Handbag industry nervously awaits Trump’s tariff decision [WWD]
  • New York’s Fashion Week scaled back to five days [Fashion United]
  • London designer Sophie Hulme to close business, citing health reasons [WWD]
  • The clothing rental market’s broadening appeal [BoF]
CULTURE
  • Nike told me to dream crazy, until I wanted a baby [NYT]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
business Campaigns data digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Farfetch acquires Stadium Goods, the UN’s fashion climate charter, ASOS profit warning

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Farfetch acquires Stadium Goods: Why sneaker resale is becoming big business [Forbes]
  • Milestone fashion industry charter for climate action launched [UN]
  • ASOS issues profit warning as Christmas sales falter [The Industry]
TECHNOLOGY
  • China’s retailers turn to real-world surveillance to track big spenders [Wired]
  • Alexa wants you to answer questions [Cognition X]
  • Is the face-swapping robot with multiple ‘personalities’ cool or just plain creepy? [Mashable]
  • Racist, sexist AI could be a bigger problem than lost jobs [Forbes]
  • Is tech too easy to use? [New York Times]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Kering launches first ‘regenerative sourcing’ standard for fashion suppliers [Edie
  • Francisco Costa is back—with the chicest sustainable beauty brand you’ve ever seen [Vogue]
  • The first “plastic-free” supermarket aisle [BBC]
  • Lacoste joins list of brands banning mohair  [Fashion United]
  • Companies used to stay quiet about politics. In 2018, social causes became integral to their branding. [Vox]
  • Is online shopping better or worse for the environment? [WWD]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Here’s how Nike, Alibaba and Walmart are reinventing retail [Wired]
  • The future of fashion is made-to-order, according to Farfetch CEO José Neves [Fast Company]
  • Amazon Go eyes London’s West End for first UK store [Retail Gazette]
  • Why Starbucks is experimenting with experience-based retail [Digiday]
  • E-commerce is thriving in Africa despite hurdles to the “last mile” [Quartz]
  • ‘It’s a big data game’: Startups compete to reinvent the convenience store [Digiday]
  • Lululemon expands test for 1st loyalty program [Retail Dive]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • You can try on the latest Adidas sneaker drop on Snapchat [Engadget]
  • Mall of America debuts holiday AR scavenger hunt [Mobile Marketer]
  • Mr Porter launches gift assistant with Facebook Messenger [Fashion Network]
  • Lululemon and Strava team up to launch a series of virtual races [Runners World]
  • Calvin Klein kills print ads — will other fashion brands follow suit? [Footwear News]
PRODUCT
  • H&M teams up with cult brand Eytys for unisex collection [Fashion United]
BUSINESS
  • Millennial consumers rule the luxury market – how are brands coping? [SCMP]
  • Samsung’s Supreme collaboration in China is with a “counterfeit organization,” Supreme says [Quartz]
  • LVMH expands portfolio with $2.6B Belmond travel deal [Retail Dive]
  • H&M says full year sales increased by 5 percent [Fashion United]
  • Alberta Ferretti under investigation by Italy’s antitrust authority [Fashion United]
CULTURE
  • Self-Portrait is growing in the age of streetwear — without flashy logos or sneakers [Fashionista]
  • Prada pulls monkey designs following outcry over racist imagery [Complex]
  • Diversity on magazine covers increased by a record double-digit percentage in 2018 [Fashionista]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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ICYMI: Payless wins with fake luxury store, British MPs grill fast fashion, UN forms sustainability alliance

Payless's fake luxury store Palessi
Payless’s fake luxury store Palessi

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Payless opened a fake luxury store with $600 shoes [Fortune]
  • MPs grill fast fashion bosses on sustainable practices at select committee hearing [The Industry]
  • UN to form alliance to make fashion more sustainable [FashionUnited]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Cambridge Analytica whistleblower joins H&M to lead AI research [TheCurrent Daily]
  • Muji designs “friendly” autonomous shuttle bus for Finland [Dezeen]
  • Smart speakers are everywhere this holiday season, but they’re really a gift for big tech companies [Vox]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Patagonia’s billionaire founder to give away the millions his company saved from Trump’s tax cuts to save the planet [Forbes]
  • Can the ‘broken’ fashion industry be fixed? [BBC]
  • For retailers and brands, sustainability needs good tech [Forbes]
  • Lane Crawford switches to greener shopping bags and packaging [WWD]
  • Next season’s must-have isn’t a handbag, it’s a conscience [i-D]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • How Casper is designing experiential retail moments [TheCurrent Daily]
  • A year in, Marks & Spencer’s virtual assistant has helped drive £2m in sales [Digiday]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • YouTube rolls out merchandise selling function [Drapers]
  • Nike tugs on heartstrings with ‘My Crazy Dream’ IGTV series [Mobile Marketer]
  • Steph Curry tells Under Armour to market his shoes to girls [BoF]
  • Instagram adds ‘close friends’ to let you share stories to a more limited group [The Verge]
  • Benefit to create pink train carriage for last minute brow treatments [Campaign]
PRODUCT
BUSINESS
  • Black Friday took one third of sales from smartphones [FashionUnited]
  • Kering to end Yoox partnership, take control of e-commerce by 2020 [BoF]
  • H&M to shut Cheap Monday [WWD]
  • Condé Nast to combine US and international businesses [BoF]
  • Cash-strapped millennials turn to instalment plans to buy t-shirts and jeans [BoF]
CULTURE
  • Bread & Butter cancelled for 2019 [Drapers]

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Categories
sustainability

Sustainability is luxury’s duty, says Kering

Laurent Claquin, Kering
Laurent Claquin, Kering

“Everyone is convinced that sustainability is a necessity and not an option, but for the luxury industry it’s actually a duty,” said Laurent Claquin, head of Kering Americas.

Speaking at the Remode conference in Los Angeles last week, he said that sustainability is steadily becoming a mark of quality, thus something every brand needs to do anyway, but there still remains a gap in luxury moving in this direction.

“The luxury sector has an obligation to lead the way, because in many ways the rest of the industry is looking to them,” added Eva Kruse, president and CEO of the Global Fashion Agenda, which is focused on sustainability. “We think the luxury sector is where sustainability would thrive the most just because of the sheer margins that it can sell its items for in terms of the price. But still, we haven’t seen a lot of companies really spearheading it.”

Kering is arguably out front having made a series of commitments to a more sustainable future, including targets for 2025 that are guided by the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and the launch of an open source Environmental Profit & Loss calculator, which enables businesses to attach a momentary value to their planetary impact.

The latter helps build the business case for sustainability, which Claquin referred to as an opportunity based around doing things responsibly. “When you do it in a sustainable way, you not only decrease negative impact, but you can create positive impact,” he explained.

Using the calculator has enabled Kering to see that 80% of its impact is actually outside its operation, due to being based largely on the extraction and process of raw materials. Creating a more sustainable supply chain therefore, has meant going to the source to work directly with suppliers and partners. Innovation is a big part of making this happen, Claquin explained.

“We’re not perfect, it’s step by step and we’re at the beginning of a long journey,” he added.

Kering recently introduced an organic cotton that is 100% scientifically traceable, thanks to a new supply chain transparency innovation.

How are you thinking about sustainable innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.