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7 ways fashion brands are harnessing hologram technology

We all remember the vision of Tupac being brought back to life by hologram technology during Coachella in 2012. 

Divided though opinion was, the interesting fact lay in the advance of the tech itself. Today, it is entirely possible for life-like constructs to be achieved in 3D so as to be visible to the naked eye. And more to the point, increasingly in a cost-effective way too. 

Today, it is estimated that the holography market will be worth $5.5 billion by 2020.

Fashion is one industry that has been experimenting in this space for some time, using holograms as both elaborate marketing techniques, as well as more immersive in-store opportunities aiming to drive brand engagement. 

Here are seven of the most interesting examples we’ve seen released over the years…

Alexander McQueen
Kate Moss hologram

In 2006, Kate Moss became the first human hologram to be featured as a part of a major fashion show. Alexander McQueen presented the 3D rendering of the supermodel as the finale of his ‘Windows of Culloden’ show in Paris. The hologram of Moss in a flowing white gown appeared out of nowhere to the audience from inside an empty glass pyramid following an elaborate puff of white smoke. The model danced for a few seconds before shrinking and dematerializing.

This iconic hologram, designed by video maker Baillie Walsh and directed by Lee McQueen himself, has become an iconic moment in fashion history and as such even saw revivals in 2011 and 2015 at the Savage Beauty Exhibits, dedicated to McQueen, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London respectively.

Diesel
Diesel SS08

In 2007, contemporary denim brand Diesel took the concept one step further from McQueen’s show the previous year by creating the biggest holographic fashion show to date for its Summer 2008 collection in Florence. The ‘Liquid Space’ show incorporated holograms that were created using the Pepper’s Ghost effect, an optical illusion that uses angled glass and hidden spaces, the technology for which was provided by tech specialist company Vizoo.

The campaign centred around marine creatures in space and used hologram technology to merge 2D projections of a high definition multi-screen video of the creatures with the real life models. The video images? were projected onto multiple transparent screens while careful lighting illuminated the catwalk with little or no scatter on the holographic screens. The virtual and real life elements on the catwalk consequently appeared as one to the audience.

Pinar&Viola
Pinar & Viola hologram

Dutch artists Pinar&Viola also used hologram technology to project an entirely virtual fashion line onto real life models in 2016 at their Amsterdam Fashion Week show. The occasion was designed to prompt emotions about clothing and encourage consumers to reconsider their rate of consumption in order to reduce wasted resources. The show was created in collaboration with AMFI student Amber Slooten and inspired by the mixed reality concepts of companies like Magic Leap and Microsoft’s HoloLens. Its aim was to explore how a future of holographic garments might work. 

The technology also allowed each piece of clothing to be animated through the allocation of characteristics such as eyes and mouths to further emphasize the conscious theme and help viewers to greater connect with the clothes despite them being inanimate.

Ralph Lauren
Holographic Ralph Lauren

The 2018 GQ Men of the Year Awards saw another first on the holographic medium front as pioneering designer Ralph Lauren beamed in via the medium to accept his ‘Design Lead of the Year’ award. The innovative concept was also created in celebration of the brand’s 50th anniversary. The realistic installation was created by Cinimod Holograms and used a staged box located away from the stage to create the theatre. The concept enabled the real life presenter at the awards to stand alongside and interact with Ralph’s hologram in a highly realistic and entertaining way for the audience.

This spectacle followed a series of other hologram integrations by the brand in previous years, including holographic window displays of sparring boxers in its Fifth Avenue flagship in New York in 2017 to promote the release of the new Polo Sport line, and the virtual spring 2015 Polo Womenswear show back in 2014  in Central Park.

Nicholas Kirkwood
CyFi walking at the Nicholas Kirkwood show

Footwear designer Nicholas Kirkwood is another that has utilized holograms by incorporating them in his inaugural London Fashion Week show in September 2018. Current Global worked with the brand to strategize the theme of the show, enhancing its cyber-reality theme by showcasing innovative visual technologies and integrating the experience of “white-hat” hackers in the presentation.

The result also saw a number of 3D hologram displays integrated throughout the show venue in order to enhance its underlying message of non-conformity. Created by tech company, Hologrm, they presented an animated 3D version of the collection’s main boot with neon detailing.

Wrangler
Wrangler’s immersive pop-up

US denim brand Wrangler also recently got on board with holograms, marking its Wrangler Icons launch with a 360-degree immersive pop-up experience that incorporated musicians and actors as well as numerous uses of the technology. The London experience paid homage to the brand’s musical heritage and iconic star-studded clientele from across the years. 

A continuous hologram feature was used to modernize the initiative, as well as helping to link the music theme back to the brand’s western image. A small black room at the back of the space appeared at first glance to house just drums and speakers however, broadcasted on top of the various instruments were holograms of dancing Wrangler cowboys wearing jeans and cowboy hats. The futuristic projections ran on a loop throughout the duration of the event.

Cartier
Cartier holographic watch

Of all of the fashion brands that have used holography over the years, luxury jeweller Cartier has perhaps one of the longest standing relationships with the technology. Back in 1972 the brand generated a lot of attention through its projection of a diamond bracelet dangling from an elegant wrist onto the Fifth Avenue pavement from its store window, which aimed to entice customers in. The piece, which was created by artist Robert Schinella, elicited so many enquiries that it was later revived again in 1979.

Cartier has also harnessed other forms of holograms as the technology has developed over the years, including a virtual craftsman working at a physical station at the Tokyo National Museum’s Cartier Exhibition in 2009, and a store windows campaign in 2015 where a hologram story mapped onto a physical watch face showing the inner workings and intricate parts involved in a watch.

How are you thinking about new technology? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Each of the rules referenced above is matched by one of our products and services. Interested in how? Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce social media technology

Digital snippets: YNAP’s 2020 growth plans, synthetic spider silk, LVMH’s start-ups

Digital snippets - YNAP
Yoox Net-a-Porter Group

We’re back with another round-up of everything you might have missed in fashion, digital comms and technology news over the past week or so. Top of the agenda is an in-depth insight from Yoox Net-a-Porter Group on how it plans to outpace the online luxury market through 2020, while there’s also highlights from LVMH’s start-up showcase in Paris, the role synthetic spider silk might play in the future, not to mention various views from the latest Snapchat campaigns…


  • How Yoox Net-a-Porter Group plans to outpace the online luxury market through 2020 [Fashionista]

  • Synthetic spider silk could be the biggest technological advance in clothing since nylon [QZ]

  • LVMH is looking for start-ups to bring personalisation to its brands [Glossy]

  • Snapchat takes turn at couture [WWD]

  • Early reads on Snapchat lenses show success for Urban Decay and Benefit [WWD]

  • Kate Moss leads line-up of stars in new Calvin Klein campaign [The Industry]

  • Shiseido ups digital game with ‘Rouge Rouge Kiss Me’ [WWD]

  • Meet MikMak, the mobile shopping network that sells via video [WSJ]

  • Beauty and the bot: Artificial intelligence is the key to personalising aesthetic products [The Globe and Mail]

  • How software is reshaping fashion’s back end [BoF]

  • Pinterest for fashion brands: ‘It’s not there yet’ [Glossy]

  • Can new technologies thwart counterfeiters? [BoF]

  • Blippar sets ‘early 2017’ date to hit mass awareness as it tunes ad business for visual search [The Drum]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce film social media technology

Digital snippets: Apple, Under Armour, Burberry, Gucci, Tom Ford, Nordstrom

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

  • Apple courts fashionistas as smartwatch expectations mount [Reuters]
  • Gisele Bundchen shows off some serious Kung Fu skills for new Under Armour ad (as above) [Creativity Online]
  • Kate Moss stars in short film for Gucci [Grazia]
  • Tom Ford to live-stream runway show for first time ever [Fashionista]
  • Target, Nordstrom make Instagram shoppable [CNBC]
  • Banana Republic creates content hub to push authenticity following brand repositioning [The Drum]
  • Twitter now testing commerce, and Burberry is the first fashion brand on board [Fashionista]
  • Google testing drone deliveries in Australia [The Atlantic]
  • At WWD, a new owner tries to change course [NY Times]
Categories
business Editor's pick social media

Calvin Klein CCO outlines ‘brand truths’ at Cannes Lions festival

Calvin Klein Melisa Goldie, Cannes Lions

Creating consumer engagement today depends on the passion and courage put in by the brand, said Melisa Goldie, CCO of Calvin Klein at the 61st annual Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity this past week.

“Talent and truth, and craftsmanship and creativity, are all really important, but they’re only important if you’re passionate about your beliefs… and then brave enough to say it,” she explained.

That thought followed a presentation outlining the four ‘brand truths’ of Calvin Klein – principles she referred to as the underpinning of its marketing messaging for nearly four decades, and the very focus that enables it to be both passionate and accordingly brave. They include seeking simplicity, dancing with controversy, leveraging tension and embracing culture.

Simplicity is a straightforward one, she said. “Think simply, but with rigorous attention.” She referenced Michelangelo’s statue of David – when asked how he carved it from a single piece of rock, he said it was simple: he just removed everything that wasn’t David.

“Calvin and controversy have long been friends,” she quipped for the next truth, highlighting such campaigns as it’s 1982 men’s underwear ad in Times Square starring Olympic pole vaulter Tom Hintnaus that literally stopped traffic. “It ushered in a new era of objectifying men,” she said. “It led to the acceptance of the male form in mainstream American advertising.”

Importantly, controversy can mean relevancy, making a brand seem modern and interesting, she highlighted. “From a business perspective, [that] then means very high ROI.”

Leveraging tension – the next brand truth – does of course sit very neatly hand-in-hand with this at times. For Calvin Klein it’s often been about leveraging visual or sexual tension, such as between Mark Wahlberg and Kate Moss with their iconic shoot in 1992.

katemoss_markwahlberg_CalvinKlein

But Goldie also suggested examples of other brands who dutifully play off different tensions. Nike leverages the idea of who a consumer wants to be and their couch: Dove sits between self doubt and a truer definition of beauty; and Apple has always looked to self actualisation and conforming, between the individual and the organisation, and between us and them. The latter’s now infamous 1984 ad is “one of the best examples of leveraging tension the industry has ever created”, Goldie said.

The brand’s final truth is about embracing culture, something Goldie said Calvin Klein has both been shaped by and has helped shape. “We have always been willing to get into bed with popular culture. It has allowed us to create deeper and more committed relationships with our consumers.”

That idea is ever more relevant today, she said, as we evolve into a world where culture happens ‘digital first’. “The dawn of the digital age means culture is more relevant [for brands] than ever before. You have to look at culture through a digital lens, then decide which changes are meaningful for you and which ones can help you shape and grow.”

Importantly, digital enables a brand to see relationships and communities being formed at far greater speed, she emphasised. “It’s now on their terms,” she said with regards to how consumers engage with your brand and the value of allowing them to feel increasingly involved in it. The #mycalvins campaign, which crowdsources selfies of fans in their Calvin Klein underwear, is her team’s efforts to respond to that.

“Today [consumers] have a personal role to play in the Calvin Klein story. We don’t want to be their parents, we want to be their partners.”

Stay tuned for a full round-up of the fashion campaigns that won at this year’s Cannes Lions festival later this week.

Photo credit: Getty Images 

Categories
film social media

Topshop launches Kate Moss video series ahead of new collection

Topshop has revealed the first in a series of videos in the run up to its new Kate Moss collection launch.

The line will hit stores on April 30 for the first time since 2010. Accordingly the retailer has teamed up with NOWNESS to tease its arrival through a total of eight films dedicated to the “supermodel, muse and designer”.

Each one will feature one of Kate’s friends and fashion contacts shot by Leigh Johnson, and providing “never before seen access to the notoriously private Kate”, as Grazia puts it.

The first, as above, stars BBC Radio 1 DJ Nick Grimshaw. Others will include Charlotte Tilbury, Amanda Harlech, Beth Ditto, Cara Delevingne, Vivienne Westwood and Natalie Massenet. That makes a total of seven, meaning the eighth may star the always-elusive Moss herself.

Here in the meantime is an additional Topshop teaser featuring the model talking about the collection from behind-the-scenes at the Topshop design studio:

Categories
social media

Cara Delevingne’s outdoor ad flies on social media

Here’s one way to grab attention with your outdoor campaign: stick a famous model on it and hope she’ll snap a pic of it to send out to her 1.5m or so combined social media fans.

That’s what happened with Love magazine’s billboard of Kate Moss and Cara Delevingne on Ocean Outdoor’s Holland Park roundabout space in London last week. In place for just three days to celebrate the cover stars of its latest issue, an image of it went viral when Delevingne herself shared it over Instagram and Twitter.

“Check me out on that round a bout! LOVE @thelovemagazine,” she wrote, attaching a shot of the poster showing each of the models posing in the bath nude.

That Instagram shot (taken on March 14) now has nearly 60,000 likes on it.

Insta_CaraDelevingne_Lovemag

Lovemag_CaraDelevingne_KateMoss

Categories
digital snippets mobile Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Diane von Furstenberg, Kate Moss, Kenneth Cole, Burberry Body, Harrods, Google

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Diane von Furstenberg releases autumn/winter 2011/12 campaign video, Journey of the Dress (as above) [The Cut]
  • See behind-the-scenes on Kate Moss and Terry Richardson’s forthcoming TV campaign for Mango [YouTube]
  • Kenneth Cole courts controversy with new website calling for consumer opinion on abortion, gun control and gay rights [Mashable]
  • Burberry Body fragrance launches with sampling drive via Facebook [Telegraph.co.uk]
  • Harrods to launch online magazine and new mobile site [Retail Week]
  • Google unveils catalogue iPad app with initial 50 brands [Refinery29]

 

Categories
film Uncategorized

BoF – top 10 fashion films of the season

The Business of Fashion has revealed its top 10 fashion films of the season, with Prada’s spring/summer 2011 campaign leading the charge.

Also featured is Tom Ford’s spring 2011 show; Chanel’s robots in Here Comes The Beauty Pack; Gareth Pugh’s film from Pitti Immagine created by Ruth Hogben; and Seven Henrietta Street by Kate Spade New York.

Anatomy of Change for House of Mugler Menswear takes the number six spot – featuring tattooed “zombie” Rick Genest, with a soundtrack by Lady Gaga.

And rounding off the top 10 is Vanessa Bruno’s Miracle; Spying on Kate Moss, a film from on the set of the autumn/winter 2010/11 Balmain campaign featured on NOWNESS; Miu Miu’s The Powder Room; and Net-a-Porter’s Bag Guide.

Check them all out alongside the BoF’s full write up, here.

1. Prada S/S 201
Categories
mobile social media Uncategorized

Calvin Klein launches biggest digital initiative to date with ck one lifestyle campaign

Teasers for the all-new ck one lifestyle line from Calvin Klein were released today.

Conceived by consulting creative director Fabien Baron of Baron + Baron, the launch campaign marks the company’s largest digital initiative to date.

Based primarily on a series of interactive videos, the initiative begins with a new website at ckone.com where users will be able to not only engage with content from the brand, but also upload their own.

A facility to submit and tag videos will be integrated, with posts positioned alongside content from the campaign’s cast members in a bid to make consumers feel as involved as possible with the brand.

“This is an important global multi-product launch and represents the company’s largest digitally-focused campaign to date,” said Tom Murry, president and CEO of Calvin Klein, Inc. “The emphasis on social media and the interactivity of this campaign serve to redefine the ck one brand for a new generation. The creative is exciting and strong and the multi-prong platform is on target to reach a younger demographic, while remaining true to the legacy of the iconic ck one brand.”

The line itself incorporates underwear, denim and swimwear inspired by the iconic unisex fragrance of the same name.

The ads are fronted by model Lara Stone, who is the face of the company across its various brands. Joining her are a variety of other young models, musicians, actors and sports stars including Alice Dellal and Abbey Lee Kershaw, boxing champion Robert Evans, and dancer Jackson Blyton Megran.

It was shot by Steven Meisel, who can also be credited with creating those infamous ck one fragrance ads starring Kate Moss and Marky Mark in 1994.

Kevin Carrigan, global creative director of Calvin Klein Jeans and ck Calvin Klein, said: “Mark and Kate were just young kids then and we wanted the same feel. We wanted to show how diverse the collection is when worn by different people, so we took one jean, one shirt, a great grey T-shirt; classic American basics, and gave them to these cool kids.”

“We put them all in a room, just a big mirrored box surrounded by cameras, and let them try the collection,” Carrigan told Vogue.com. “The ck one collection is not about wearing clothes the way you’ve been told, it’s about making them your own. We put the pieces in there in all sizes, from XXXL to XS; it’s not about the perfect size – it’s a play on proportion and androgyny. Girls were wearing jeans that were baggy and far too big, or wearing oversized shirts as dresses, they made the collection their own. It’s the personalisation of fashion – and the campaign is really just a reportage of them trying the clothes.”

The full reveal of the campaign takes place from March 1, while in the meantime fans are encouraged to become fans of Calvin Klein on Facebook to be kept up-to-date with more information.

There’s also a mobile app, which will integrate video and social media as well as the use of augmented reality to enable further access to content such as from behind-the-scenes.

And if you’re in one of a dozen or so major cities around the world, it’s also likely you’ll spot the campaign on one of numerous LED billboards.

The print version of the campaign, created from stills of the videos, will debut in April magazines, and for the first time be globally enabled with AR technology.