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business digital snippets e-commerce mobile product Retail social media Startups sustainability technology

Shutting down LFW, Farfetch acquires New Guards Group, the UN’s agriculture alert

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Scrap the catwalk: Extinction Rebellion is right – LFW is unsustainable (The Guardian)
  • Farfetch acquires Off-White owner New Guards Group (BoF)
  • UN states we have to transform how we use land and grow food (Fast Company)
TECHNOLOGY
  • Nike buys an AI startup that predicts what consumers want (Tech Crunch)
  • Can artificial intelligence help society as much as it helps business? (McKinsey)
  • How fashion retailers are using artificial intelligence in 2019 (Edited)
  • Google implements augmented reality in maps (Mashable)
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Only 1/8 Bangladesh garment factories passed international safety inspections (Fashion Network)
  • Sustainable retail: do shoppers love it or hate it? (Retail Week)
  • Volcom launches ‘Water Aware’ denim collection (Fashion United)
  • The challenges of building a socially conscious band (Vogue Business)
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Depop opens pop-up store in Selfridges (Fashion United)
  • Live stream apps are changing the way people shop (BoF)
  • Boohoo wants to beat Zara at its own game (BoF)
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Climate change activist Xiuhtezcatl Martinez is the face of a new fashion campaign (Teen Vogue)
  • The future of fashion will be run by influencers (Quartzy)
PRODUCT
BUSINESS
  • Barneys files for bankruptcy as rents rise and visitors fall (BoF)
  • Boohoo to snap up Karen Milen & Coast in pre-pack (Retail Week)
  • Adidas posts jump in sales and profit (Fashion United)
  • Michael Gove orders HMRC to help small retailers in no-deal Brexit (Retail Gazette)
CULTURE
  • Victoria Secret cancels its runway show (Retail Dive)
  • Heist asks whether shapeware can be feminist in new campaign (Campaign)
  • Versace loses Chinese brand ambassador amid t-shirt controversy (BoF)

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Categories
business data digital snippets e-commerce film mobile technology

What you missed: Luxury on Amazon, understanding data, Nike’s Mark Parker

Luxury is resistant to selling on Amazon
Luxury is resistant to selling on Amazon

The big news this week surrounds the ongoing resistance from luxury to sell on Amazon. Jean-Jacques Guiony, CFO of LVMH, said last week, there is “no way” it would do business with Amazon. “We believe that the existing business of Amazon… doesn’t fit our luxury, full stop, but also doesn’t fit with our brands,” he explained.

Quartz writer Marc Bain has a great overview on this. As he starts his story: “Next year [Amazon is] expected to become the biggest apparel seller in the US, and it boasts an enviable customer base for higher-end brands”. Yet of course, it also presents the problem of being too accessible and not reflective of the high quality customer experience luxury brands are aiming for online – many of them only recently.

Meanwhile, also worth reading this week is a piece on Nike’s Mark Parker and his view on imagination, innovation and art, another on how tech hubs are helping luxury brands return to their roots, and one on the way in which artificial intelligence is changing retail forever. If that wasn’t enough, be sure to also check out new campaigns from Abercrombie & Fitch through to Patagonia.


TOP STORIES
  • Is it even possible to sell “luxury” on Amazon? [QZ]
  • Fashion marketing is failing to understand data [Glossy]
  • Nike’s Mark Parker on imagination, innovation and art [Another]
  • How Silicon Valley (and other global tech hubs) are helping luxury return to its roots [LeanLuxe]
  • Number of Europeans using mobile payments triples, Visa study finds [Internet Retailing]

BUSINESS
  • How Brexit is set to affect how we shop [Daily Telegraph]
  • How do you sell a $6,000 bag your customer can’t touch? [QZ]
  • In stagnant luxury market, luggage brands roll on [BoF]

ADVERTISING
  • Abercrombie & Fitch tries on a new attitude: friendly [WSJ]
  • New Patagonia short film shows how fair trade shopping is good for business [Co.Create]
  • In REI’s tearjerker, people carry out a fellow hiker’s lifelong dream in tribute to his life [AdWeek]
  • Longchamp takes virtual stroll through Paris to mark boutique renovation [Luxury Daily]
  • Avon calling: #BeautyBoss campaign reboots brand [BrandChannel]

RETAIL
  • How artificial intelligence is changing online retail forever [TechCrunch]
  • Karen Millen launches B2B-only tech concept store [Decoded Fashion]
  • British Telecom launches connected store concept [Decoded Fashion]

TECHNOLOGY
  • We’re getting closer to clothing made entirely by robots [QZ]
  • How mobile is transforming product search — and why voice may be next [Retail Dive]
  • Alibaba’s new payment system lets virtual reality shoppers pay by nodding [Reuters]
  • VR is where my fashion dreams can become reality [The Verge]
  • Silkworms spin super-silk after eating carbon nanotubes and graphene [Scientific American]
  • Elle’s augmented reality experiment: fad or future of media? [WWD]

UPCOMING EVENTS
Categories
e-commerce social media Uncategorized

#smwf offers coffee shop analogy for retailers, repeats control vs presence argument

Social media can be likened to the coffee shop opposite your store, according to JC Mighty, e-commerce communications manager at Aurora Fashions, which owns UK high street brands Karen Millen, Oasis and Warehouse.

Speaking as part of a panel on social shopping at the Social Media World Forum (#smwf) today, he said: “Our website is like our store, email is the window of the store, and social is the coffee shop across the road from the store.”

In so doing, he aimed to banish the notion fashion brands should fear “losing control” through the social space – (it’s somewhat astounding this is still raised as a discussion point, but it proved, as on many other occasions, a key question to the panel this afternoon).

Mighty explained while in this online world, much like its offline counterpart, you can’t control what consumers are saying, if you go into the “cafe” you can at least engage with them there.

“The customer exists in that space, talks in that space… it’s not control we need to regain, but presence we need to establish,” he said.

At some point, I hope we manage to stop repeating that very fact, the having to define what social is in order to encourage retailers on board. It would seem, perhaps surprisingly however, we’re not yet there.