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Events mobile Retail social media technology

Balmain launches app to connect customers to brand universe


Luxury label Balmain has released an app that aims to give consumers more access to the brand’s universe, in a mission championed by creative director Olivier Rousteing.

The app, which was released on iTunes yesterday, will allow users to engage with the brand in a multitude of different ways.

“The app is the final element of the strategy we are rolling out to launch the new monogram, the new logo, and to support overall the new communication strategy of Balmain,” the label’s CEO Massimo Piombini told WWD. “This is a way to connect with the next generation, with new customers, with a segment of customers that are close to the brand that are expecting from us these kinds of new features.”

For example ahead of the label’s upcoming couture show which takes place on January 23, users will be able to scan posters through the streets of Paris to trigger augmented reality content. Users will also be able to watch a livestream of the show, the house’s first couture collection in 16 years, as well as footage of the menswear show that is happening tomorrow.

To give brand fans a further glimpse into the brand, there will also interactive content around its new Saint Honoré flagship, which is due to open in February. The brand has announced that it will also be launching similar initiatives at key European cities in the future.

Under Rousteing’s helm, the 82-year-old label has been increasingly connecting with younger consumers through the lens of digital. In April 2018, it created a virtual reality experience at its Milan store based on the designer’s inspirations for the brand’s collections, while its latest campaign featured a cast of virtual models.

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Editor's pick film mobile

Miu Miu partners with Miranda July on alternative messaging app, short film

somebody_miumiu

Miu Miu is continuing its Women’s Tales series with not just another short film, but an accompanying app.

This time in partnership with artist and filmmaker Miranda July, the ‘Somebody’ project is based on the idea of a “new way to communicate”.

“Texting is tacky. Calling is awkward. Email is old,” declares a statement from July. The app accordingly offers something different altogether – the opportunity for a third person to go and deliver your message for you. Users write what they want to say to a friend into the app as per normal, then using GPS to locate said individual, pick a stranger that is physically nearby (and also has the app) to verbally present it on their behalf.

Each stranger comes with photos and performance ratings to help in the selection process. The message also always starts with the sentence: “[Recipient’s name]? It’s me, [Sender’s Name]” — reminding the messenger to take on the identity of the sender. Essentially it’s like sending someone a script with performance directions included – you can even add emotions for the stranger to consider in their delivery, like [crying] or [longingly].

July came up with the concept based on memories of singing telegrams and the way romantic messages used to be delivered by friends at school. “I see this as far-reaching public art project, inciting performance and conversation about the value of inefficiency and risk,” she explained.

The write-up continues: “Half-app / half-human, Somebody twists our love of avatars and outsourcing —every relationship becomes a three-way. The antithesis of the utilitarian efficiency that tech promises, here, finally, is an app that makes us nervous, giddy, and alert to the people around us.”

The film (as below), which premiered at the Venice Film Festival this week, ties the concept of the app together, showcasing it in action with various groups of people. There’s a break-up, a marriage proposal, an argument and a particularly intriguing end-scene with a plant.

The app was developed with designer Thea Lorentzen and developers from Stinkdigital. Its launch comes with some official hotspots to encourage ‘critical mass’, including Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The New Museum (NY), Yerba Buena Center for The Arts (SF), Portland Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, The Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), and Museo Jumex (Mexico City).

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social media

Former Topshop, Burberry exec launches Tunepics – an image-based music sharing app

Tunepics on the iPhone

Will.i.am, Kate Bosworth and Jamie Oliver are among some of the first celebrity names to be using a new music discovery app called Tunepics, while brands including Paul Smith, Chloé and asos are also on board.

Ever wanted to share a song with your photograph to help sum up the mood of the scene more than a filter alone can do? Now you can. Tunepics – launched in the app store for the iPhone and iPad today – enables users to pair images with relevant songs thanks to the iTunes API.

“Over 500 million pictures are uploaded to the internet every day, and over 100 million songs are downloaded each week. Together, that’s dynamite,” says the brains behind the new social network, Justin Cooke, former CMO of Topshop, now founder and CEO of innovate7. His aim is to help create the “soundtrack to your life”.

The experience is an intuitive one: you upload an image, place a filter over the top, then search the 35 million songs in the iTunes library by keyword to add them to your shot. The result appears in a feed alongside those from the friends you opt to follow; each one auto-playing a 30-second preview of the track as you scroll over it, as well as offering a ‘download’ button to buy the full version.

Posts can also be ‘re-tuned’ to your own followers, and shared via Facebook and Twitter where they will appear as a ‘tunecard’. For the likes of Will.i.am, that of course makes the app an appealing proposition for its potential to help drive record sales. It also provides a revenue stream for innovate7 through affiliate sales from iTunes (there’s no advertising model planned on the platform for now otherwise).

Cooke is particularly excited for the opportunity that lies in music discovery, both for consumers using the app and for young, emerging talent to start gaining recognition in a new way. On that basis, it launches with a specially commissioned soundtrack from British band, Ellerby, called Colour Me In.

But the premise of the app, which was built by agency AKQA, otherwise goes further than just being about music sharing and discovery. The aim is to provide multisensory experiences that evoke an emotional response.

“When you hear a picture, it changes everything; it awakens your senses. We want [Tunepics] to be like a cinematic celebration of your life,” said Cooke. “Music is the most powerful way to express the things we see and feel; nothing else comes close.”

To that end, the emotional response that posts receive from followers is also fully visible. Each is accompanied by an ‘emotion wheel’ (the design of which also makes up the app’s logo). This features a spectrum of 16 colours users can choose from, representing different feelings such as happy, moved, jealous and heartbroken.

Said Cooke: “A like doesn’t tell a story on its own anymore. When [Nelson] Mandela passed away, we didn’t want to say that we liked it, but that it moved us. This is all about enabling an emotional experience.”

Which is why this app also makes sense, from the off, for brands. Beyond the initial celebrity appeal, there are also the likes of Paul Smith, All Saints, asos, Dazed and Airbnb already on board.

The expectation is that embedding music into their social content will help heighten the moments they want to talk about. An example post from Paul Smith featured a collection of paint pots and the Rolling Stones track Paint it Black. “His response was that he couldn’t imagine life without music. That’s so powerful, and so true,” Cooke explained. In fact, a similar quote from philosopher Nietzsche features on the Tunepics introductory video from the innovate7 team: “Without music, life would be a mistake.”

Clare Waight Keller, creative director of Chloé, said the choice to join Tunepics from day one was an instant decision after a two minute pitch. “I just loved the added layers of emotion, simply adding music to an image really brings it to life. It’s like a way to capture what was going through your head in that moment.”

She also appreciates the emotion wheel. “[It] will be really interesting. ‘Likes’ have almost become empty gestures now, it takes no real thought to ‘like’ a picture. But to take the time to select the feeling the image inspired in you, shows real engagement. It’s a great way for Chloé to connect with our audience,” she explained.

Brands will also begin to benefit from the data said emotion wheel collates. Mood charts are displayed beneath each tunepic showcasing people’s responses, which suggests valuable consumer insights could be gleaned should the numbers creep high enough. Unlike Instagram, it is also possible to add hyperlinks to every post, which will prove quite the draw for the likes of Paul Smith again, and all those others with e-commerce capabilities.

It may come as no surprise to learn that prior to his role at Topshop, Cooke spent six years helping to lead the charge at Burberry – a brand not only with a longstanding music initiative in Burberry Acoustic, but with an unquestionable focus on emotive content tied to measurable business results.

Topping it all off is the fact those aforementioned filters are based on the weather – another theme familiar to Burberry fans. Every photograph uploaded can be enhanced with true-to-life overlays of the snow, raindrops, sunshine or even a rainbow.

“I’ve always had a fascination with music, colour, images and the weather, and how they influence our mood and emotions. I want people to be able to share the depth behind the moments they experience and to articulate all the ones that they dream of having,” Cooke explained.

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data digital snippets e-commerce social media

Digital snippets: social media rankings, Topshop, Hermès, Free People, Asos

Here’s a highlight of stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

BOF_Top10

  • Do the digital and social media rankings that have flooded the fashion industry really mean anything? [BoF]
  • Topshop, iTunes team up, web users able to sample and download music as they shop [WWD]
  • Hermès promotes silver jewellery collection with ‘symphony of silver’ video [PSFK]
  • Free People gets 10% of its online sales from app in first week [Mashable]
  • Attention, shoppers: store is tracking your cell [NY Times]
  • Analysing online department store SEO: ASOS gets the basics right [Econsultancy]
  • Meet the other woman behind Net-a-Porter, president Alison Loehnis [Fashionista]
  • Announcing Divvy: the app that won the Co.Labs and Target Retail Accelerator [Co.Labs]
  • With Cinematique’s ‘touch-enabled’, shoppable videos, product placement might not be so bad [TechCrunch]