Categories
Editor's pick sustainability

Consumer demand for accountability and sustainability is on the rise, says report

Fashion Revolution
Fashion Revolution

Ahead of Black Friday, arguably the biggest global shopping day each year, Fashion Revolution has launched a report highlighting that European consumers are urging brands and governments to take the lead in the fight for sustainability within the fashion industry.

Consumers want to know more about the social and environmental impacts of their garments when shopping, and it is incumbent on brands and governments to address those issues, the research reveals.

“The pace of change by the fashion industry simply isn’t moving fast enough, and we can see this reflected in consumer attitudes,” said Sarah Ditty, Fashion Revolution’s policy director. “People have an urgent, emotional desire to know more about how their clothes are made, and that they haven’t harmed the environment, the people who made them nor were tested on animals. And they want governments to hold brands and retailers to account to ensure this happens.”

Conducted across the five largest EU markets (UK, Germany, France, Spain and Italy), the findings from the study reveal that under the topic of sustainability, environmental factors such as climate change (85%) and environmental protection (88%) are considered important by the majority of people, followed by social issues such as global poverty (84%) and gender inequality (77%).

Furthermore, 72% of those surveyed said that fashion brands should do more to improve the lives of the women making their clothes – there is a gender split in opinion, however, as 81% of women surveyed think brands should tackle gender inequality, against 72% of male respondents.

Meanwhile the government should be more proactive in not only ensuring practices are established, but developing tools to communicate it back to the population, it finds.

In an era of extreme distrust in institutions, this cry for change is more relevant than ever. The report shows that the majority of people (68%) place responsibility on the government to hold fashion brands accountable for their sustainability methods. 77% think that fashion brands should be required by law to respect the human rights of everybody involved in making their products, while 75% think they should protect the environment at every stage of the supply chain. Additionally, 72% say brands should provide information about the environmental impact of their business.

“We’d like the general public, companies and governments to use our research to help drive change in the fashion industry, to better influence their peers to care more about social and environmental issues in fashion and start asking vital questions about the impacts of our clothing,” added Ditty.

How information is communicated is a vital part of the puzzle in helping consumers match their sustainability goals with actual purchase. An earlier report by Fashion Revolution also highlighted that 80% of consumers think brands should publish which factories were used to manufacture their clothes, or which suppliers they use to source their materials from (77%).

Earlier this week, fashion data platform Lyst unveiled its year in fashion report for 2018, which trackers over 100m searches on its site over the past 12 months to analyze the trends and the buzziest brands. It revealed a 47% increase in shoppers looking for items that have sustainable credentials, using terms like “vegan leather” and “organic cotton”. Veja, a French-Brazilian sneaker brand that uses sustainable that uses sustainable materials, showed a 113% year-on-year uptick on searches, for example.

How are you thinking about sustainability? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
business data social media

Google is making street style fashions shoppable in new LiketoKnow.It partnership

LiketoKnow.It
Shoppable street style on Google thanks to LiketoKnow.It’s content integration

In today’s social media age there’s an endless stream of content being uploaded across multiple platforms every day. For the 10,000 influencers who use blogger monetization network, rewardStyle and its Instagram shopping tool LiketoKnow.it, there are at least 1,000 daily street style posts being shared on Instagram alone.

Some of those names are the most influential in the fashion game, which not only makes that content increasingly important, but explains why Google GOOGL -0.64% would want to get its hands on it from a search perspective. As it stands, it doesn’t have a way to index any of those images, let alone the information that comes with them – much of what’s on Instagram and indeed on Snapchat or even Pinterest is locked within those platforms.

And so Google has teamed up with LiketoKnow.It to power a new “Shop the Look” tool that pulls in shoppable influencer content. “Google came to us in the spring of this year understanding how much is happening in these closed social channels. It knew if it wanted to be competitive it had to leverage that content,” explains Amber Venz-Box, president and co-founder of rewardStyle.

Head over to Forbes to find out more, including exactly what that means for the user and the specifics of the duo’s additional partnership around fashion week season.

Categories
social media

The @BoF indexes fashion influencers in new #BoF500 list

BoF500

None too impressed by other rankings frequently released in fashion, The Business of Fashion has decided to launch its own instead. This time the subject is the influencers that are shaping the global industry, rather than the brands. And there’s 500 of them in total.

In an introductory note, founder Imran Amed refers to these people as “vital connectors in the intricate web of relationships that binds the global fashion community together”.

He writes: “They are blue-chip titans who helm the industry’s mega-brands and daring young upstarts whose fashion stars are fast rising. They are disruptive entrepreneurs building the next wave of $1 billion start-ups and opinion-leaders whose points of view attract followers, online and off. They are power princesses, chic sheikhs and supermodels, as well as discreet, behind-the-scenes catalysts who spot and support the industry’s top talents.”

The index itself is being released as a limited edition print run, but also online via businessoffashion.com/BoF500 where everyone featured has a dedicated professional page.

Social media activity of the BoF 500 can also be tracked via a live mosaic – a space that pulls in visual content from all of their personal feeds, and categorises things like what’s trending, how many images have been posted in the past 24 hours, and the most active location (Paris at present).  The result, says Amed, provides “a continuously unfolding glimpse into the collective consciousness of the global fashion industry”.