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Campaigns Editor's pick

Hunter flies giant hot air balloon boot in experiential campaign

Hunter "The Original Flying Boot"
Hunter “The Original Flying Boot”

Hunter has launched its largest ever experiential campaign with “The Original Flying Boot”, which sees a 120-foot wellington boot-shaped hot air balloon fly across the globe.

Setting off from the brand’s birthplace in Scotland, the boot will be appearing at festivals, sporting events, shows and other key outdoor moments across Europe and the US throughout the year.

The boot, which features all of the iconic wellington (or “welly”) boot’s design details, aims to promote the brand’s position as a British export. The balloon will travel down from Scotland to London in July before heading over to Europe, where it will appear at major events in countries like Spain and Belgium. It will eventually make its way to the US to engage with the brand’s largest overseas market.

The campaign is also being supported by a social media element where users are invited to post pictures of the hot air balloon using the #HunterOriginal hashtag for a chance to win Hunter prizes.

Brands are increasingly tapping into outdoor experiential campaigns not only as a way to keep their name front of mind, but create opportunities for earned media. The more aesthetically-pleasing or original the campaign is, the more it is photographed by consumers and shared on social. Similarly this year for Valentine’s Day, British womenswear and accessories label, Anya Hindmarch, released its Chubby Hearts activation where gigantic inflated red hearts – similar to the design of its handbags that season – were scattered across iconic London spots such as Battersea power station and Hyde Park.

Hunter "The Original Flying Boot"
Hunter “The Original Flying Boot”
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business data digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Bitcoin millionaires love streetwear, voice shopping on the rise, solving the last mile

Bitcoin millionaires are coming for streetwear
Bitcoin millionaires are coming for streetwear

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Bitcoin millionaires are coming for streetwear [GQ]
  • Alexa, I need … everything. Voice shopping sales could reach $40 billion by 2022 [USAToday]
  • Solving for the last mile is retail’s next big disruption [RetailDive]
  • What Gucci’s gun stance says about the end of corporate neutrality [BoF]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Levi’s revolutionizes finishing process, driving more sustainable supply chain [TCDaily]
  • Unilever and IBM’s blockchain experiment: a silver bullet for digital or a ‘glitzy’ quick fix? [TheDrum]
  • JD.com’s new accelerator focuses on blockchain startups [TechCrunch]
  • JD.com upgrades AR/VR capabilities for beauty [WWD]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • Why is it so hard for clothing manufacturers to pay a living wage? [Racked]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Wear now, pay later: credit shopping goes digital [BoF]
  • ‘To find it, just Boohoo it’: How the fast-fashion retailer is making a go of visual search [Glossy]
  • Stitch Fix CEO Katrina Lake talks data, Amazon—and hot tubs [FastCompany]
  • Macy’s just confirmed the end of department stores as we know them [Business Insider]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • The Outnet is using its chatbot to push out influencer content [Glossy]
  • The Gap wins over Instagram with this empowering breastfeeding ad [FastCompany]
  • Allbirds is selling a limited-edition shoe exclusively on Instagram [Glossy]
PRODUCT
  • Hunter teams up with Target for limited edition collection [TheIndustry]
  • The US is now buying more stretchy pants than blue jeans [QZ]
BUSINESS
  • Why Burberry chose Riccardo Tisci [BoF]
  • How Guess mismanaged its #MeToo crisis [BoF]
  • Marks & Spencer publishes gender pay gap and pledges to extend monitoring to age, ethnicity and disability [TheIndustry]
Categories
Editor's pick product

Hunter opens wet weather pop-up in NYC’s Grand Central Terminal

Hunter's greenhouse pop-up in New York's Grand Central Terminal
Hunter’s greenhouse pop-up in New York’s Grand Central Terminal

Hunter has launched a pop-up greenhouse in the Vanderbilt Hall at New York’s Grand Central Terminal, recreating the misty landscape of the Scottish Highlands.

Created to celebrate the brand’s British heritage, the pop-up is modeled on a traditional glass-roofed design. Visitors entering it are greeted by the atmospheric sound of rain, moss underfoot and an ethereal layer of Scotch mist – a mixture of fog and light rain common in the Scottish Highlands. Inside, they are then able to interact with some of the Hunter Original Core Concept rainwear pieces, including boots and jackets, in the environment they were designed for.

“Combining our pioneering Scottish heritage with a contemporary and playful approach to rainwear, we have built an immersive environment for the customer that we hope will transport them back to our roots,” says the brand’s creative director, Alasdhair Willis. “We wanted to celebrate Hunter’s relationship with wet weather essentials by bringing a piece of our British heritage to an iconic location in New York. The authenticity, values and versatility of the collection is what has made it such a success to date and we want to showcase that – we’ve harnessed new materials from lightweight rubber to fully showerproof cotton and developed a seasonless, unisex collection that challenges the standard connotations of rain.”

The pop-up is an extension of Hunter’s commitment to continually engage with its biggest market: the US. It will be open from Sunday, October 22 until Wednesday, October 25.

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business digital snippets mobile social media Startups technology

What you missed: endangered fashion unicorns, Dior’s YouTube moves, Facebook marketplace

fashion unicorns
Fashion ‘unicorns’ have become an endangered species

This week’s round-up of relevant fashion business, digital comms and tech news neatly sums up a series of things to be tracking at present: the evolution of social media businesses into greater advertising and commercial retail opportunities, the role customer service and messaging apps play together, the explosion of all things virtual and augmented reality, and an ongoing bevy of start-ups to know about.

Meanwhile, also worth reading this week is detail on David Lauren’s promotion to the role of chief innovation officer over at Ralph Lauren, Dior’s catch up strategy on YouTube, and the growth of physical stores by online players including Warby Parker and Bonobos.


TOP STORIES
  • Fashion ‘unicorns’ have become an endangered species [BoF]
  • Dior’s borrowing Chanel’s strategies to catch up on YouTube [Glossy]
  • Mastercard launches ‘selfie pay’ [FT]

BUSINESS
  • LVMH to buy majority stake in Germany’s Rimowa for $716 million [BoF]
  • Swarovski, maker of all things bejewelled, refashions itself as a tech company [NY Times]
  • As their incomes rise, Chinese consumers are trading up and going beyond necessities [McKinsey]
  • Ralph Lauren promotes founder’s son to chief innovation officer [Bloomberg]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Facebook launches Marketplace for local buying and selling [Reuters]
  • For young brands, is the Instagram opportunity shrinking? [BoF]
  • Pinterest Promoted Video lands in the UK with Hunter on board as a partner [The Drum]
  • Snapchat users are spending 78 seconds on average playing Under Armour’s Cam Newton game [AdWeek]
  • An inside look at Snapchat’s new advertising API technology [AdAge]

ADVERTISING
  • Reebok adds Gigi Hadid to #PerfectNever campaign [MediaPost]
  • Farfetch inspires consumers to find the perfect product in new #TheOne campaign [Luxury Daily]
  • Google, Facebook become focus of holiday digital campaigns [MediaPost]

RETAIL
  • Warby Parker, Bonobos have big plans for physical stores [WSJ]
  • Shopify adds Facebook Messenger direct sales channel [Retail Dive]
  • Salesforce launches LiveMessage to provide customer service across messaging apps [VentureBeat]
  • Cocktails, cinemas and concierges: Malls weave a web of their own to entice customers [Financial Post]
  • Now you can sign up for a “.shopping” domain name [Apparel]
  • The Outnet launches first android app [Fashion United]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Japanese brand Anrealage hosts augmented reality fashion show [Glossy]
  • Mark Zuckerberg’s VR selfie is a bigger deal than you realise [Wired]
  • Will Google’s ‘soft and cozy’ approach to VR headsets make the space more mainstream? [AdWeek]
  • The mainstreaming of augmented reality: a brief history [HBR]

START-UPS
  • Venture capitalists invest $56 billion in start-ups so far in 2016 [Reuters]
  • New app co-created by Elon Musk’s estranged wife could be a game-changer for retail [BGR]
  • Online fashion retailer Grana raises $10M led by Alibaba’s entrepreneurship fund [TechCrunch]
Categories
Editor's pick social media

Hunter launches World’s Smallest Festival, partnership with Giphy

World's-Smallest_Festival_Hunter-Boots
The World’s Smallest Festival, in place at the Hunter flagship store on Regent Street

Hunter is continuing with its promise to focus on festival-themed activations over fashion week shows, today launching “the World’s Smallest Festival” in its flagship store on London’s Regent Street.

Disguised as a portaloo – an ironic reference to the most-dreaded festival experience – the festival is in fact a GIF photo booth in collaboration with GIF library, Giphy. Users are able to take animated pictures of themselves before customising them with exclusive Hunter festival filters and stickers. Any shared online are in with a chance of winning a festival pack from the brand.

The portaloo is otherwise designed to feel like actually being inside a mini British festival – complete with grass, mud and live music. There will be secret festival product giveaways, including wet wipes, welly socks, ponchos and gift vouchers, in addition to a programme of pop-up performances.

 World's Smallest Festival Hunter
Inside the World’s Smallest Festival by Hunter

Hunter also hopes to capitalise on festival buzz once Glastonbury comes around this year. It will launch a series of limited edition filters and stickers in Giphy Cam, which is Giphy’s mobile GIF camera app for iOS, from Wednesday June 22. Anyone using the app, whether they’re at a festival of not, will be able to add exclusive Hunter content to their images. Again, those who share tagging @HunterBoots and #Beaheadliner on Twitter, will be in with a chance of winning Hunter festival products.

Earlier this year, Hunter held a Festival Summit that revealed insights including an 11% growth in festival-related Google searches year-on-year in 2015, as well as a significant spike in weather searches in the two days prior to Glastonbury. Research from JWT Intelligence, also showed that three-quarters of millennials in Britain attend at least one festival per year, and 76% of millennials would now prefer to spend their money on experiences over material possessions.

“The nondisposable moments at festivals carry so much weight: They are unforgettable, watertight, locked-down emotional memories that, as a brand, you want to access and be associated with,” said Alasdhair Willis, creative director at Hunter, during the summit. “The reach and commercial opportunity of festivals makes them a very serious business that would be foolish to ignore.”

The World’s Smallest Festival pop-up will be in Hunter’s Regent Street store from Thursday, June 9, until the end of the month, before travelling to other UK cities over the summer.

Categories
business e-commerce Editor's pick social media

UPDATE: Your guide to all the strategic changes happening around fashion weeks

gigi_tommyNEW

We know fashion weeks are changing radically around us. Numerous designers have opted to shift from producing shows intended for trade, to ones that actually resonate with the consumers they’re ultimately supposed to reach.

For many, this means creating collections that can be bought in-season: a see now / buy now strategy, as it’s largely being called. But others are doing something different again: some stepping out of the fashion week race altogether, others merely changing the time of year the collections are shown instead.

At this point, the result is a bit of a muddle – a variety of strategies that may or may not work. Safe to say, where leaders including Burberry, Tom Ford and Rebecca Minkoff are stepping, numerous others are waiting in the wings to see what sticks before figuring out if they too will join the (r)evolution. The question is, will the traditional Parisian houses go there?

Here’s a round-up of all the changes so far:

UPDATE FEB 19: Mulberry

Mulberry is the latest to outline its plans to more closely align runway with retail deliveries. Ahead of its return to the London Fashion Week schedule with new creative director Johnny Coca this Sunday, the brand announced it will showcase part of its Fall 2016 pre-collection on the catwalk to tap into the idea of providing product that can be bought much sooner – it will drop in stores in April. CEO Thierry Andretta said the move will short-circuit the production of cheap high-street copies, allow retailers to sell original designs at full price and give customers quicker access to new products.

UPDATE FEB 12: Tommy Hilfiger

Hot on the heels of other big name brands listed below, Tommy Hilfiger has also announced a direct-to-consumer shift. It will kickstart such plans with its TommyXGigi collection, with supermodel Gigi Hadid, in September 2016, before moving to a full in-season and shoppable consumer show in February 2017. As BoF highlights, this is no small undertaking for a brand with over 20,000 points of sale, more than 1,500 stores and distribution in 115-plus countries. In fact, 60% of the company’s sales come from wholesale. It will accommodate those lead times with private appointments for trade in September. “When the collection is on the floor, there is going to be an incredible amount of excitement that normally happens six months earlier,” said chief marketing and brand officer, Avery Baker.

UPDATE FEB 12: Proenza Schouler

Proenza Schouler will make eight of the looks walking in its New York Fashion Week show next week, available to buy in its own store in Manhattan within 24-hours. Clients will also be able to pre-order other pieces. The designers call it an experiment as this point, in that they’ve manufactured limited quantities in advance, but something they’re looking to expand on. “We’ll see how this performs and take it from there,” said one half of the duo, Jack McCollough. “If it’s sold out a week after the show, then we’ll definitely push it further.”

Burberry

Burberry is shifting its fashion week calendar and supply chain so it shows in-season in both February and September (starting September 2016), and its collections are available to buy “immediately” after they’ve appeared on the catwalk, both online and in-stores. Chief executive and chief creative officer, Christopher Bailey, said: “There’s just something that innately feels wrong when we’re talking about creating a moment in fashion: you do the show in September and it feels really right for that moment, but then you have to wait for five or six months until it’s in the store… You’re creating all this energy around something, and then you close the doors and say, ‘Forget about it now because it won’t be in the stores for five or six months’.”

Tom Ford

Tom Ford originally cancelled his fashion week show in favour of one-on-one appointments with press and buyers this season, before opting to shift the entire plan to September when he will present both women’s and menswear for autumn/winter 2016. It will also be available to buy on the same day. “In a world that has become increasingly immediate, the current way of showing a collection four months before it is available to consumers is an antiquated idea and one that no longer makes sense,” Ford said. “Showing the collection as it arrives in stores will remedy this, and allow the excitement that is created by a show or event to drive sales and satisfy our customers’ increasing desire to have their clothes as they are ready to wear them.”

Rebecca Minkoff

In a bid to capture consumer appetite and enable immediate purchases, Rebecca Minkoff (as pictured) will show her spring/summer 2016 collection during New York Fashion Week this month – that’s the same one (plus a few extra pieces) that she already put out in September. About 30-50% of the audience will be comprised of “everyday” consumers too. This catch-up season will then enable her to continue on a direct-to-consumer model with her autumn 2016 line. “Now all of a sudden, the Super Bowl [of shows] twice a year actually becomes an actual buying and retail celebration and festival, versus just a big tease,” CEO Uri Minkoff said.

Misha Nonoo

Misha Nonoo hit the headlines last season for her “Instashow”. While she has something similarly different up her sleeve for this coming week, she is otherwise also following suit and skipping a traditional show format until September 2016 when she will begin to show in-season for consumers to view and shop.

Hunter

After just four seasons showing as part of London Fashion Week, Hunter is stepping away from the catwalk entirely this season, and instead focusing wholeheartedly on exploring and amplifying its music festivals opportunity. It will hold multiple global customer-facing moments during 2016, according to a statement. Detail is yet to emerge, but safe to say real integration with festivals, as well as shifting the model in terms of when and how consumers have access to product will be the priority. “Continuing our commitment to innovate, now is the time to push things further. At this time within our industry, the moment is right to change things up and, as a brand, Hunter can do just that,” said creative director Alasdhair Willis.

Matthew Williamson

Matthew Williamson left London Fashion Week earlier in 2015 to move to a new model of six collections a year to suit what it calls the “buy-now-wear-now mentality” of its consumer. It closed its flagship store and opened a showroom in its place to operate as an appointment-only boutique for online shoppers. Business director Rosanna Falconer says it was a move that made enormous sense for shoppers. She was frustrated by the fact she used to be presenting images on social media fit for spring and frequently receiving comments back from fans referring to the fact it was cold outside, for instance. “It was so simple for the shopper; it just didn’t make sense. There’s nothing worse than feeling like you’re pushing something onto a consumer that they’re not ready for.”

Vetements

One of the latest announcements comes from Vetements. In a slightly different move, it will show (and produce) just two collections a year, and will do so in January and June, rather than in March and October (as Paris Fashion Week falls) to coincide more closely with pre-collections. The intention of doing so is to align with the fact a bigger portion of retailer’s budgets are spent on such lines, and they get more time on the sales floor before being discounted. For now it will still operate on a long lead-time of circa six months but the plan down the road is to swap the seasons over and deliver product by February for instance. “To reach this result, the whole production will have to be pre-produced. It means each piece in the collection will be part of a limited edition. No restock. One delivery. The true definition of luxury is something that is scarce. It would be nice to give luxury back its true meaning,” said CEO Guram Gvasalia.

BONUS: Karl Lagerfeld

In conversation with WWD, Karl Lagerfeld said he’s not against changes to the fashion system “if the future goes in that direction”, but that he would never do it the same way. He said companies that produce complex garments and use special materials would need to “make two collections — one immediate, and one available in six months. It’s a way to do the future and the present. It’ll just mean a little more work, ha ha ha”. He also noted that delivering clothes several months after their unveiling is not necessarily a bad thing. “There’s also the excitement of waiting for something,” he said.

And so the conversation continues…

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Blocks business Comment e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Digital has irrevocably transformed fashion weeks, is it finally time to change the model?

givenchy_ss16

Over the past few weeks and months, fashion brands Matthew Williamson, Hunter, Rebecca Minkoff and Thakoon (to name a few) have made strategic decisions that will not only redefine their business models, but impact the fashion industry as a whole.

Each of them has opted to either withdraw from participating in fashion week, or make their fashion week endeavour a more consumer-facing experience.

At the heart of such plans lies the challenge that social media has presented. As Linda Fargo, senior vice president of fashion and store presentation director at Bergdorf Goodman, told WWD: “We give [the customer] shearling coats in June when she’s just starting to think about shorts. We spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to create excitement and buzz for beautiful products and brand image with runway shows, allowing fast retail to copy it within weeks, while it takes us five months to get deliveries to her. By then, she’s tired of it because it’s been seen in too many posts and images. If you described the fashion cycle from a marketing, seasonality, desire/fulfillment perspective to anyone with any common sense, they would look at you like you were crazy.”

Needless to say, the industry is slowly but surely feeling the need to do something about it. Read the full in-depth story via Forbes, where experts weigh in on whether shifting to a direct-to-consumer model is something that makes sense across the board, or a fit for more contemporary, commercial brands compared to their heritage, Paris-based counterparts. One thing’s for sure, it’s a debate that will take some time to resolve.

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business Comment Editor's pick technology

Agility matters: why Hunter not showing at LFW is a good thing

Hunter_LFW
Hunter Original, London Fashion Week spring/summer 2016

During spring/summer 2016’s round of fashion weeks held this past September, Hunter applied its usual experimental attitude to Twitter-owned live-streaming app Periscope. The British brand known for its wellington boots launched a campaign that saw live gigs taking place in the back of a customised vehicle. Exclusive access was provided to different artists who performed in the build up to the brand’s Hunter Original catwalk show.

While the initiative was a relatively quiet one given it was such a new platform, it made an enormous amount of sense for a brand that is entrenched (quite literally) in festival culture. It almost felt like a promise to who it could become; a nod to its authentic connection with music. Consequently it said it would carry the campaign through to 2016 with further gigs hosted on the way to the biggest festivals around the world.

Yesterday, the brand then announced it would be moving away from the traditional fashion calendar, no longer holding a London Fashion Week show and instead focusing wholeheartedly on exploring and amplifying this festivals opportunity.

It’s a decision that makes a great deal of sense. While fashion weeks are enormous marketing opportunities, and Hunter always did an incredible job of pulling in big names to ensure maximum press exposure – from Anna Wintour and Stella McCartney (wife of creative director Alasdhair Willis), to Paul McCartney, Rita Ora, and Salma Hayek – they’re increasingly an exercise in frustration for the consumer.

Hunter_ss16backstage
Backstage at Hunter Original, London Fashion Week spring/summer 2016

At risk of preaching to the converted, here’s how it goes: brand spends big budget on fashion week show, invites big guests, does cool innovation piece to gain extra column inches and encourage consumer engagement. Consumer tunes in to said show because unlike in history, digital means everything is in real-time and accessible to them to fawn over as though they were in attendance themselves. They fall in love with it, and want to buy, but alas, they can’t.

While the communications side of the model has sped up, the backend hasn’t changed. The nuts and bolts of the industry remain as slow as ever, and while numerous brands have promoted exclusive ‘buy now’ items from the runway, most of the time a consumer has to wait circa six months before they can actually get their hands on the product.

The issue with that in today’s immediate and connected culture, of course, is that come next season when the respective items are suitable to wear, consumers are already onto the next idea, and less interested in purchasing what they would have been when they were truly captured in the moment. It’s an ROI conundrum.

Phew…

hunter_glasto
Hunter at Glastonbury 2015

Needless to say, changing it is no small feat, particularly off the back of board meetings that lead with the line: “Because that’s the way it’s always been done”. But many are slowly but surely looking to kick that setup and come up with something else instead.

Matthew Williamson has already done it. Tibi found success by shifting towards monthly in-store releases a while ago. Both Jean Paul Gaultier and Viktor & Rolf decided to step away from ready-to-wear to focus solely on couture and fragrances. Other brands like Jonathan Saunders have announced they’re shutting down entirely, while some of the industry’s highest profile brands are losing designers in the face of the pace being just too much pressure. In short, any sort of change feels like it makes a lot of sense, and those willing to take the risk through restrategising should be applauded.

According to Hunter, it’s a time that feels right to move the needle on how it engages with its customer and how it excites the industry. Says Willis: “Hunter has been on an incredible journey these past two years, gathering real momentum as we set about transitioning this 160 year business. During this massive transformative period we have delivered four brand-defining Hunter Original shows at LFW. Using this success as a strong tail wind, and continuing our commitment to innovate, now is the time to push things further. At this time within our industry, the moment is right to change things up and, as a brand, Hunter can do just that.”

hunter_nyc_popup
Hunter’s New York pop-up store in November 2015

It will hold multiple global customer-facing moments during 2016, according to a statement. Detail is yet to emerge, but safe to say real integration with festivals, as well as shifting the model in terms of when and how consumers have access to product will be the priority.

On top of that, comes of course the global aspect – Hunter believes standalone stores are instrumental to its growth towards a lifestyle brand and numerous new openings are planned as a result.It is hoped the success of its first flagship on Regent Street in London, will be quickly replicated by its Tokyo store opening in March 2016, and then its further plans in New York and Hong Kong. There’s also a joint venture with Itochu in Japan and significant investment being placed in multiple languages for its e-commerce site.

Turnover during 2014 increased for Hunter by 17% year-on-year to £95.7m, with pre-tax profits of £15.4m, up 5% from 2013. This doesn’t therefore feel like a change that’s coming in the face of negative results as it has perhaps been for others (neatly spun into a positive news story), rather a bid to stay on top and keep performing to the advantages the industry can offer when approached in ways that work better. It’s also perhaps a straightforward admission that money can be more efficiently spent than the vanity project fashion week shows so often become.

hunter_heritage
A heritage Hunter photograph

As the brand’s head of innovation and social media, Michelle Sadlier, posted on Twitter yesterday: “Taking risks, always innovating…so proud that Hunter has the agility and ability to do something epic like this!”

It’s nice, for once, to see that idea of “agile”, as we so often refer to the new wave of direct-to-consumer fashion start-ups, actually being played out in what is fundamentally one of Britain’s most treasured heritage brands.

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Editor's pick film

A pick of the best campaign films for A/W 15/16

outlaws

We might be in the final throes of the spring/summer 2016 fashion week season, but all the while our consumers (remember those) are starting to dress for autumn. Accordingly, a number of new films have been released that tick the box for both creativity and relevancy. They even feature looks you can buy now…

Here’s our pick of the best for autumn/winter 2015/16:

Belstaff


It might be 15-minutes long, but Belstaff’s Outlaws is one of the most engaging film on this list. David Beckham takes on the role of “The Stranger”, a mysterious drifter (he doesn’t actually have any lines) and motorcycle stuntman haunted by memories of a trapeze artist played by Katherine Waterston, and hunted by a maniacal director-cum-circus-master seeking revenge, played by Harvey Keitel. Tarot cards, late night diners and biker gangs also feature, Cathy Moriarty stars too, and if that wasn’t enough, Liv Tyler is executive producer.

Miu Miu


Narrative is often central to Miu Miu films and this season is no different, albeit it in a more conceptual fashion leaving you trying to figure it out. Subjective Reality, as the Steven Meisel piece is called, sees upcoming actresses Maddison Brown, Hailey Gates, Mia Goth and Stacy Martin play the role of casual passersby being admired through a number of lenses. In a voyeuristic fashion, the women clearly know they’re being watched, as they go about their business in a gritty New York setting – buying bagels from the street cart, waiting at the bus stop, sometimes being upstaged by others in the street, and more.

Hunter Original


Judy Blume’s Famous Five is the inspiration behind Hunter Original’s short film called A Hunter Highland Fling, which sees a group of young pioneers venturing through the Scottish Highlands. Visual artist Thomas Traum worked on the piece, which results in all sorts of digital graphics appearing throughout, which when paired with the tinny music, makes for what feels like you’re witnessing a virtual reality gaming experience.

Calvin Klein Jeans


Calvin Klein Jeans made headlines with its “sexting” -themed campaign this season. Based on the idea of today’s online dating nature, this is the brand once again combining the idea of being raunchy with what’s incredibly relevant in pop culture today, especially with the digital generation. Its provocative film shot by Mario Sorrenti, follows the same theme with groups of men and women, men and men, women and women, sharing the fact they’re getting together, and getting it on, via text messages.

River Island


Passion is at play over at River Island too, where models Hollie-May Saker and Simon Nessman feature in a film dedicated to them trying to pose a kiss for the camera, when the director keeps shouting “cut”. Several attempts later they’re clearly bored of such guidance and take matters into their own hands.

Kate Spade


Kate Spade is back with the third in its #missadventure series starring actress Anna Kendrick. This time set in a Russian Tea Room, it’s all about the company she keeps, from her dog to her handbag, and a special guest appearance from American journalist and activist Gloria Steinem. The piece is, once again, also completely shoppable.

Givenchy


There’s something a little more playful than expected in Givenchy’s film this season too. The Riccardo Tisci-led brand focuses on the frivolity of riding a bike, skipping, and playing a pinball machine, all the while set against the backdrop of an opulent stately home. Even bouncing a basketball on the dining room table underneath an elaborate chandelier isn’t a step too far for directors Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott.

H&M


David Beckham also appears in this list for H&M. The former footballer is on set in the retailer’s new Modern Essentials collection, when his agent shares the fact US comedian Kevin Hart is coming along to shadow him in advance of playing his character in “I Beckham, The Movie”. A very amusing tale follows of Beckham’s every move being watched and recorded. “There’s method acting, and then there’s what I plan on doing,” says Hart in their first encounter.

Valentino Men’s


Valentino’s seasonal menswear expression doesn’t lead with a narrative like many of the other films this season, but it does suggest that you’re missing one. Almost like the hint for a bigger tale still to come, it shows models in the busy Columbia Road Flower Market surrounded by the sounds of people all around them, the stall owners yelling out special deals and the constant backdrop of church bells. Flowers in arm, it’s otherwise a simple showcase of the collection.

And some others we’d recommend:

Rag & Bone dropping a concrete block on a car behind actress Gabriella Wilde; Burberry’s 70s vignettes of London; Behati Prinsloo on the American football field for Tommy Hilfiger; real-life shoplifters at Harvey Nichols as a promotion for its new rewards app; Marc Jacobs’ famous faces talking about what inspires them every day; and models over at Alexander Wang confessing to big secrets about themselves.

Categories
Editor's pick social media technology

The best of tech coming up at #LFW

FyodorGolan_anchor

London Fashion Week kicked off yesterday, and while there might not be quite as much buzz around tech or digital ideas at the shows as there was in New York this season, there are still a handful of things worth knowing about.

Head over to Forbes for a highlight of the best, including Burberry’s early Snapchat reveal, Hunter’s mobile gigs on Periscope, Topshop’s Pinterest Palettes, Henry Holland’s NFC-enabled wearables, Fyodor Golan’s Transformers (as pictured) and a look ahead at Intel as a patron of the British Fashion Council.