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6 examples of brands winning on TikTok

If there’s one social media platform buzzing right now, it’s TikTok, a space that allows users to create and share short lip-sync, comedy and talent videos.  

With an audience of almost half a billion users in its two year existence, and a +237% monthly growth rate between 2017-2018, brands are now thinking about how they can tap into it. 

The platform, which is owned by Chinese tech giant Byedance, and was merged with Musical.ly in 2018, has proven wildly successful among Chinese consumers. This has since transferred to the US, with 2.6m actively users taking to the platform in February alone, placing it as the most downloaded app in the country during Q1. The loyalty of Generation Z and Millennials have been driving usage particularly, with 66% of users reportedly under the age of 30. 

While the likes of Snapchat and Instagram are being questioned – both in terms of popularity on the one hand, and functionality on the other, TikTok has swooped in to grab some of the key market share. Importantly, it’s doing so by thinking about functionality first – its recommendations are much more accurate than other social media platforms, for instance, meaning viewers get better content tailored to their interests, which spurs advocacy for the app further. It has also added the functionality of shopping by allowing brands to drive users to ecommerce-enabled microsites that open directly within the TikTok app. 

As a result, we’re seeing brands and retailers taking to TikTok to push products, increase engagement and drive loyalty among younger consumers. Here are six examples of those incorporating it into their marketing strategy today…

Hero Cosmetics
Hero Cosmetics holy grail patches

Direct-to-consumer skincare brand, Hero Cosmetics, utilized TikTok in its new ‘Get Ready with Me’ campaign, featuring 20 creators sharing their morning routines. The campaign was targeted at Gen Zers, and plugged into a #schoolsurvivivalkit hashtag to tie it to back to school essentials. The videos, which reached 4.3m users, had a 12% engagement rate compared to only 4.5% for Instagram, the brand said.

Uniqlo
Uniqlos #UTPlayYourWorld campaign

Apparel retailer Uniqlo teamed up with Tiktok as part of its #UTPlayYourWorld campaign to promote its 2019 spring/summer collection. Users were encouraged to upload videos wearing their favourite outfits from the collection and would be entered into a competition to get their video played in store. The campaign was available for those in the US, France, Japan and Taiwan and generated over 600m views on the platform.

Burberry
Burberry Fall 2019 campaign

Even luxury brands are jumping on the TikTok bandwagon to gain traction with younger consumers. Burberry challenged users to upload videos of themselves attempting to do a “TB’ hand gesture, reflecting the Thomas Burberry monogram newly instated from creative director Riccardo Tisci. 30,000 videos were uploaded to the platform, generating 57 million views for the brand.

NFL
NFL TikTok Campaign

The NFL signed a two year agreement with TikTok to post content on the platform, including highlights, sideline moments and behind the scenes clips. To celebrate the collaboration, a #WeReady hashtag challenge was created to encourage users to show their support for their favourite teams. The challenge is the beginning of the NFL’s strategy to engage younger consumers in sports, as only 41% of Gen Z reportedly watch sports on television, compared to 75% of Baby Boomers.

Ralph Lauren
Diana Silvers, the face of Ralph Lauren’s campaign

To celebrate the US Open Tennis Championships, Ralph Lauren used TikTok as its campaign platform of choice. Consumers were asked to share a time when they won a real life challenge, by using the hashtag #WinningRL. Ralph Lauren face Diana Silvers, an actress and tennis player, took part in the campaign with a series of three videos that made use of TikTok’s latest shopability widget that lets customers buy directly within the app. Users could discover the brand’s US Open collection, which featured polos, tennis skirts and shorts.

Chipotle
Chipotle’s #GuacDance challenge

To celebrate national avocado day, Chipotle launched a TikTok campaign called the #GuacDance challenge. The food chain called on its customers to upload dancing videos to express their love of the food. The campaign was the platform’s highest performing branded challenge in the US, receiving 250,000 video submissions.

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business data digital snippets e-commerce social media Startups technology

What you missed: luxury data, Mr Porter and Apple TV, the store of the future

Mr Porter Apple TV fashion digital data
Mr Porter on Apple TV

On to Paris Fashion Week and things have certainly been quieter on the digital and technology front. The furore around bloggers and editors continues (yawn), while a little ray of hope shines through in Intel’s partnership with Hussein Chalayan.

On top of that this past week has been everything from why the store of the future doesn’t want to actually sell anything, the new Mr Porter x Apple TV app launch, and the fact even Chanel and Hermès are struggling in the current climate.


TOP STORIES
  • Private data is the ultimate luxury good [Motherboard]
  • Mr Porter launches ‘first of its kind’ shoppable Apple TV app [The Drum]
  • Intel brings wearable technology to Hussein Chalayan’s Paris Fashion Week show [Forbes]
  • Why the store of the future actually doesn’t want to sell you anything [LeanLuxe]

BUSINESS
  • Ralph Lauren maps out ‘way forward’ for global growth [BrandChannel]
  • Even Chanel and Hermès susceptible to current climate [BoF]
  • ASOS investigation claims to expose the ‘true cost’ of fast fashion [Huffington Post]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • How Garance Doré and the street style revolution upended fashion with a camera and a blog [Wired]
  • This Snapchat game from Under Armour turns you into a NFL star [AdWeek]

ADVERTISING
  • Kevin Hart and David Beckham take a fun, disastrous road trip for H&M [AdWeek]

RETAIL
  • More than 50% of shoppers turn first to Amazon in product search [Bloomberg]
  • New York is full of shopkeepers who swear by cash registers that are little more than glorified adding machines [WSJ]
  • How marketing automation can help your omni-channel strategy [The Industry]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Every Fossil Group designer wearable launched in 2016 so far, including Michael Kors, Kate Spade and more [Wareable]
  • Long Tall Sally creates mannequin based on 3D scan of actual customer [The Industry]

START-UPS
  • Where to invest in fashion technology? [Luxury Daily]
  • Armarium and Net-a-Porter team to pair clothing rentals with purchases [Glossy]
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business digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups technology

What you missed: Snapchat’s spectacles, driving see-now buy-now sales, Cartier’s sponsored content

Snapchat spectacles
Snapchat spectacles

It might have been Milan Fashion Week, but the majority of musing worth knowing about in the digital space this past week surrounds the launch of Snapchat’s (now Snap Inc’s) new camera glasses. On top of that has been everything from whether see-now, buy-now fashion week shows are actually driving sales, the fact McQueen and Chanel top a new CoolBrands list, and why LVMH’s digital drive is taking time despite its big Apple hire. Read on for a breakdown of everything you need to know…


TOP STORIES
  • Why Snapchat’s spectacles can succeed where Google Glass failed [AdAge]
  • Are ‘see now, buy now’ shows driving sales? [BoF]
  • Neiman Marcus is encouraging brands to adopt ‘see-now, buy-now’ strategy [Fashionista]
  • Alexander McQueen and Chanel make top 20 global CoolBrands list [The Industry]
  • Inside Cartier’s sponsored content strategy [Glossy]

BUSINESS
  • LVMH’s digital drive takes time despite Apple hire [Reuters]
  • Adidas and Under Armour are challenging Nike like never before [Business Insider]
  • Tiffany proposes growth through engagement in the digital age [BrandChannel]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • YSL Beauté reveals first ever UK Snapchat lens [The Industry]
  • Adidas claims retention on Snapchat is ‘insane’ compared to YouTube [The Drum]
  • Teens talk Instagram beauty influencers and what makes them buy [Racked]
  • Here’s how much engagement brands got from back-to-school social posts [AdWeek]
  • Google launches messaging app with chatbot [Campaign]
  • Branded emojis coming to messaging apps [WSJ]

MARKETING
  • Gap teams up with Mr Black to raise awareness for denim care [Fashion United]
  • Bobbi Brown initiates mobile makeovers with Uber [WWD]

RETAIL
  • How designer Rebecca Minkoff uses technology to create a better shopping experience [The Street]
  • BHS to launch online a month after last store closed [Guardian]
  • Zara fashions an expanded online growth strategy [BrandChannel]

TECHNOLOGY
  • The secret lab where Nike invented the power-lacing shoe of our dreams [Wired]
  • No. 21 Sends shoes that glow in the dark down the Milan Fashion Week runway [Footwear News]

START-UPS
  • Carmen Busquets, fashion e-commerce’s fairy godmother [NY Times]
  • Where is the Uber of fashion? [Forbes]
Categories
business mobile

Digital ads: Surging sales, video, mobile and the social media effect

H&M, April 2016
H&M, April 2016

US digital ad revenues reached an all-time high of $59.6bn last year, according to a new report. That’s a 20% surge over the previous record-breaking year. And the pace is quickening: Q4 saw a 23% year-on-year rise to $17.4bn and an 18% surge over the previous quarter.

The full-year IAB Internet Advertising Revenue Report, produced in association with PwC US, also offered up some even more interesting stats when it got down to the detail of just what that advertising was all about.

  • Mobile advertising skyrocketed (66%) to $20.7bn last year, reflecting the migration of consumers to mobile devices.
  • Non-mobile digital video, a component of display-related advertising, rose 30% to $4.2bn as advertisers targeted increasingly video-focused Millennials and Generation Z consumers.
  • Social media advertising rose 55% to $10.9bn as advertisers convinced themselves that social networks were the place to be.
  • Non-mobile search revenues rose a slower 8% to $20.5bn.
  • Retail advertisers continue to represent the largest category of internet ad spending, responsible for 22%.

“Internet advertising was a disruptive innovation when the industry was formed,” said PwC’s David Silverman. “Twenty years later we still see double-digit growth rates. Three key disruptive trends, mobile, social, and programmatic, continue to fuel this exceptional rate of growth.”

“There’s no question that interactive screens are attracting consumers and the advertisers that want to reach them where they live, increasingly on mobile devices,” added IAB’s Sherrill Mane.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

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e-commerce

Digital India: Ready for take-off

pernia

It may not be the world’s most mature e-commerce market but it’s set to grow 10-fold in the next five years. Which market am I talking about? India, of course.

A new report says it’ll be worth $100bn in five years and perhaps $250bn in a decade, as internet penetration increases, more consumers get smartphones and digital networks reach rural areas.

Who says so? Direct selling industry body FICCI and consultants at KPMG, The Economic Times reported.

And the growth will start quickly, especially as Indians will own 350m smartphones by 2017 with 500m people in the country having broadband access.

Now those figures may look large but if you take into account that India’s population is 1.267bn (which works out at 17.5% of the world’s total population), they actually seem quite small. That’s because, despite the expansion of the internet into rural areas, it’s still the urban middle class that has been driving uptake and that will continue to do so.

Still, the growth potential is huge because Indians are moving en masse into cities. The government estimates that by 2030, it would see 350m people moving from rural to urban areas and by 2050, 700m people.

The potential for digital selling is staggering…

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday. (Picture courtesy Perniaspopupshop.com)

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e-commerce Startups

India’s Styletag.com gets growth funding

styletag

India’s digital market is growing and more homegrown business are gearing up to exploit that growth. Styletag.com, the country’s first online curated fashion and lifestyle startup has raised US$7.5m in angel funding from real estate magnate Jitu Virwani.

OK, $7.5m is not a huge sum in tech terms, but Virwani, with a three-decade track record of building business, knows a good investment when he sees one.

So what is Styletag.com? It makes luxury product accessible to price-conscious fashion shoppers via its flash sale model.

The company will use the money to further expand its range of private labels, acquire a raft of other designer brands and strengthen its team.

Founder and CEO Sanjay Shroff said the company has grown exponentially since launch but is committed to “enriching” the customer experience and staying “ahead of the curve.”

Virwani added that: “Similar investments have been carried out in the past from my end into projects that have been extremely fruitful. I find the startup e-commerce space a very exciting one and it is an extremely dynamic and upcoming market. Through similar investments, I want to encourage players in the startup space.”

styletag-2

So what are Styletag’s credentials? At launch in 2012 it drew on the 20-year experience of Sanjay Shroff and his wife Yashodhara founding and running Southern India’s first-ever multibrand luxury store ffolio.

The Shroffs decided they could bring together high-end with affordable prices for the millions of consumers based in and around smaller cities across the country. Since then it has walked a line between its mix of Western looks more traditional Indian styles.

Shroff said he foresees scaling up to 100 omnichannel models across major Indian cities in less than two years with its physical store presence ready to aid in brand building.

Current growth projections indicate it should soon reach 100,000 orders for the festive season and Styletag is looking to establish gross merchandise value of between $7m and $10m by year-end.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

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business e-commerce Editor's pick

Natalie Massenet on consumers, growth markets and the future

Net A Porter Founder Natalie Massenet Interview
Net-A-Porter chairman and founder Natalie Massenet with Bloomberg Television anchor and editor-at-large Francine Laqua 

Natalie Massenet, chairman and founder of Net-a-Porter, has indicated she is staying put with the company after it merges with Yoox SpA. In an interview with Bloomberg TV she said: “We’ve only just begun.” The 50-year-old founder will become the merged company’s executive chairman, with defined responsibilities reportedly in areas such as editorial content, advertising strategy and fashion press.

Describing herself as a “reluctant leader,” Massenet said the scale of the business is all that will change. “We’re going to be the same, but bigger,” she said. Here are some of the other interesting things she commented on:

On launching e-commerce

“If a Martian came to earth and looked at shopping, they would say, ‘Explain this to me again? So people with a lot of money are asked to leave their homes and go to you, you then put them in a really cold room with bad lighting and ask them to take all their clothes off and put on the clothes, and then they have to make the decision then and there without the rest of their wardrobe and their shoes, then they go home, um, and then they pay you for that?’ and the Martian would have probably said, ‘…If the person’s paying, shouldn’t you go to them, shouldn’t they try things on at home with the comfort of their friends and people advising them that they know, shouldn’t they be trying things on with their own shoes and shouldn’t they have time to think about it, and if they want to keep it, they keep it, but if they don’t, then shouldn’t you go and get it from them and say is there anything else I can do?’ So actually, just because shopping existed in one way doesn’t mean that’s how people wanted to shop.”

On that viral retirement video for former CEO Mike Sebba

“[Sebba] had been running the company for 11 years and I had this fear that because he hadn’t been so outward-facing, that he wouldn’t be a digital part of our history, because these days if we can’t find you on Google, do you exist? I don’t know! Am I here? So I thought we need to make sure that Mike Sebba, CEO of Net-a-Porter, goes down in history as having been the CEO of Net-a-Porter for eleven years, so I thought we need to make a digital footprint. It was about going viral.”

On creating a print magazine

“We thought, we’re a multimedia company, we are where our consumer is, and why are we ignoring print, in the same way that if you’re a print publication, you’re a media company, you would never ignore a website, you would not ignore social, you’re there. So, for us to be a complete media business, and to communicate with our consumer we needed to be there in a different form. But then what we did was we didn’t just say, ‘Oh let’s take the website and put it into a paper format’, we approached that platform with what’s great about it, and our editors create the most beautiful reading, immersive, inspiring experience that lasts; it sits on your coffee table hopefully.|”

On the shopper of tomorrow

“They’re a very demanding customer… and they’re the ones who are [going to] dictate, and do dictate, everything. They’re also very lucky. It’s such a great time to be a consumer; they have choice, they have everything at their fingertips, literally, and everything comes to them. The shopper of tomorrow does not need to move, they are a very busy person, like today, and demand more from their retailers, demand a lot, and our job is to anticipate their needs and be there for them.”

Net A Porter Founder Natalie Massenet Interview
Bloomberg Television anchor and editor-at-large Francine Laqua interviews Net-A-Porter chairman and founder Natalie Massenet, for ‘Leaders with Lacqua: Natalie Massenet’

On growing in China

“In mainland China right now, the AOV on e-commerce transactions tends to be much lower than where we’re playing thanks to the strength of some extraordinary e-commerce businesses out there. So the consumer is well engaged in e-commerce, but the time will come when they turn to e-commerce for different things. We’re using our media, our magazine, our digital magazine that comes out in Chinese once a week 50 times a year, and we’re using that as part of the education process in terms of talking about fashion and inspiring the consumer, and we’re seeing really exciting, strong growth in China. It was within our top 20 markets five years ago; it will be within our top 10 within the next year.”

On the future of the business

“Well, we’re going to be the same but bigger… we’ve only just begun, our penetration and our addressable market is still negligible, we’ve got cities that we aren’t even talking to. Within just our existing space, we’re tiny, so I think, just keeping our heads down, focusing on the consumer, focusing on our brand partnerships and doing everything that we’re doing but doing it better… I think that you’ll see more local service propositions and we’re going to have to continually advance the speed with which we deliver and how we cater to the consumer’s needs. I think that we will have learned how to be local but global… while still retaining a very focused DNA for each of the brands, and not trying to be all things to all people, I think that’s important.”

The interview “Leaders With Lacqua: Natalie Massenet” airs again today at 7pm GMT, and at 3pm, 9pm and 11.30pm on Friday, July 3.