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business Editor's pick Retail sustainability technology

The greater need for transparency: 7 brands regaining consumer trust

Sustainability has been a major talking point for the fashion industry over the past couple of years. In this year’s State of Fashion report, radical transparency was highlighted as one of the major trends retailers should be implementing. But following rising concerns of greenwashing, from misleading PR-led campaigns to the increase of fake news, consumer trust is at an all-time low and brands are having to work harder to prove their authenticity in the matter.

The Gen Z generation is particularly pushing for this change, with 90% believing companies should take responsibility to address environmental and social issues. Meanwhile almost three-quarters of Millennials are willing to pay a premium for sustainable products, demonstrating how there is tangible value in transparent produce. In order to regain their consumers’ trust, brands must therefore be explicitly open with information regarding data protection and how sustainable their supply chains truly are.

Technology is playing a major role in helping promote transparency, from blockchain helping shed light on the supply chain, to holistic e-commerce interactions. Here, we highlight some of our favorite examples of brands disrupting the space by going that extra mile in regards to transparency:

Patagonia
Patagonia: The Footprint Chronicles

Patagonia is one of the pioneering brands when it comes to sustainability, fully disclosing its textile mills, factories and farms through its website. The ‘footprint chronicles’ is a visual map showing information about the supply chain including the numbers of workers, gender mix and items produced there. Patagonia was the first outdoor brand to be certified to the Advanced Global Traceable Down Standard for maintaining excellent animal welfare standards for birds. 

As a result of its ongoing efforts, Patagonia was identified as one of the leading brands on Fashion Revolution’s most recent Transparency Index, receiving a score of 64%. 

Nestle
Nestle trialing blockchain

Nestle is the first major food and beverage company to utilize the use of blockchain technology, allowing consumers to trace the origin of their food. The company is aiming to eventually reach full supply chain transparency, with this move shedding light on 95% of its annual sourcing of raw materials. 

Products will have a QR barcode that when scanned, provides consumers with Tier 1 information on product, such as harvest date, farm location, packing date, as well as information on how to prepare it. To determine the feasibility and viability of the technology, an initial pilot scheme testing the traceability of milk will be created first, with plans to expand into palm oil production.

Walmart
Walmart beef supply chain

As it stands, only 33% of consumers trust the food system. Following the Tesco horsemeat scandal in 2013, consumers have become increasingly skeptical of where their food has come from, particularly when it comes to meat produce. In the US, Walmart is addressing this by developing the first beef supply chain. The system, which took 2 years to develop, follows a previous blockchain pilot on lettuce and spinach, which aimed to reduce contamination rates, following an increase in vegetable-related illnesses.

H&M
H&M product transparency

In the UK, retailers are only required to disclose where the garment was made, but this year to increase its transparency, H&M made the decision to go one step further by sharing specific details about their individual suppliers. Consumers can now access information on the production country, supplier name, factory name, and even the number of employees in that factory. H&M is setting the bar in the industry by allowing consumers to make informed decisions when purchasing, helping them to shop responsibly. 

For H&M’s sister brand Arket, sustainability has been a primary consideration from its inception. Beyond showcasing suppliers, the brand also aims to design long-lasting garments, while informing its customers on how to care for them and prolong their lifespan.

Volition
Volition’s clean products

Volition is democratizing the beauty industry with products designed from crowdsourced ideas that are voted by the general public before making it into production. The brand uses scientific ingredients to deliver safe and effective products, from skincare to bath and body. Volition gives all of its products the ‘safe science’ seal of approval, catering to the 42% of consumers who feel they do not get enough information on ingredient safety. 

Following consumers request of non-toxic but highly effective products, Volition’s experts created a blacklist of harmful ingredients, giving consumers peace of mind about what they are putting onto their skin.

Selfridges
Selfridges Buy Better Campaign

Department store Selfridges is doubling down on its Buying Better labels, which aim to aid consumers in their purchasing choices.  The labels highlight sustainable product attributes, such as vegan, forest-friendly or supporting communities. The labels are part of the retailer’s commitment to ensure that 50% of its products are better for people and the planet by 2022. Currently, over 3000 products across homeware, fashion and beauty feature the labels, helping guide consumers away from the disposable, fast fashion mindset.

Drunk Elephant
Drunk Elephants holistic products

Skincare brand Drunk Elephant may be new to the market, having launched in 2014, but it is already catching both the eye of consumers and major beauty conglomerates alike. Consumers have gone wild for its transparent, no-nonsense approach to skincare. The products are based on biocompatibility, and use clinically-effective natural ingredients. Each product listed on its website has a detailed breakdown of all the ingredients and their purposes, creating a holistic user-friendly experience. 72% of consumers want brands to explain the purpose of ingredients and Drunk Elephant is leading the with their holistic product breakdowns. 

As a result of this education-led approach, and its popularity with younger consumers, the brand has recently been acquired by Japanese giant Shiseido for $845million.

How are you thinking about sustainability? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more.

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business Editor's pick product Retail technology

6 brands driving consumer engagement through customization

The availability of data and an increased purchasing power has pushed retailers to create products and services beyond the standard selection. Whilst traditionally customization was seen as a luxury feature, the democratization of fashion has led to many high street retailers offering the service as another way to engage consumers.

In today’s digital era, the abundance of data has made it easier for retailers to personalize marketing content, but this is now going one step further to individual design and styling. Consumers want products tailored to their own specific needs and style, and by offering customization, retailers can increase their value and differentiate from the competition. 

From a business perspective, offering customization can be financially rewarding too, as 1 in 5 consumers will pay a 20% premium for personalized products or services. Customization can also be a sustainable method of production, as products are created to meet the exact demand, thus minimizing the risk of excess stock. 

Meanwhile, as manufacturing processes become more sophisticated and streamlined through features like 3D printing and automation, customization is something we will see more of in the future. As we continue to watch this trend develop, here are 6 brands driving engagement  through customization.

Louis Vuitton
Louis Vuitton custom Run Away sneaker

The sneaker industry is expected to be worth $95.14billion by 2025, and Louis Vuitton is another luxury brand hoping to tap into that booming market by offering consumers customized sneakers. Consumers will have the option to customize the Run Away sneaker by changing its colour, material and stripes and for an extra personal touch, get their initials printed or hot stamped on the shoe.

Fame & Partners
Fame & Partners bridemaids dresses

Fame and Partners is a contemporary womenswear brand based in LA trying to combat overproduction in the fashion industry by offering made-to-order garments. Through their Custom Clothing studio, consumers can customize any item by choosing the silhouette, sleeve length or neckline. The brand’s strategy eliminates the need for excess stock, helping to reduce waste that would otherwise be sent to landfill. 

Function of Beauty
Function of Beauty custom hair care

This DTC beauty brand has taken over social media with its Instagrammable hair care line that target Gen Z consumers who are seeking products unique to their needs. Consumers can go online and take a quiz to determine their hair profiles, selecting up to five hair goals, ranging from color protection to curl definition. They can also choose both the scent and color of their products, creating a customized product from design to function. Each bottle is then formulated using clean ingredients, which are cruelty-free and 100% vegan.

Rapha
Rapha custom collection

Cult British brand Rapha is disrupting the cycling market by partnering with Unmade to create a customizable team collection. Customers are given the opportunity to create their own unique jersey designs, including team logos, which are then manufactured into a bespoke product. Poor user experience and long lead times are usually a set back when it comes to customization, but Unmade’s print solution allows for quick bespoke manufacturing on a smaller scale.

Puma
Puma’s new NYC flagship

To enhance customer experience in store, Puma has created an exclusive customization studio at its new flagship store in New York. Customers can customize a range of footwear and apparel using paints, patchwork, embroidery, 3D knitting, laser printing and material upcycling. The studio also collaborates with new artists on a bi-weekly basis, with Sue Tsai, BWOOD and Maria Jahnkoy being the most recent.

Levi’s
Levi’s customization patches

Levi’s brand strategy has revolved around making products your own since the original blue jean was patented in 1873. These days, many Levi’s shops have a dedicated tailor shop that can customize and repair products, such as adding patches, studs, embroidery, stencilling and distressing, so consumers can have a one-of-a-kind product. To align with its sustainability initiatives, the brand also offers a full repair service which does anything from fixing rips and holes to color fading, helping well-worn jeans gain a new lease of life.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
business data digital snippets e-commerce mobile product Retail social media sustainability technology

Analyzing fashion’s G7 pact, Gen Z’s streetwear needs, the rise of rentals

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Can fashion’s latest sustainability drive at the G7 summit make a difference? (BoF)
  • Gen Z wants something very different from streetwear (Vogue Business)
  • Everyone is launching rental service. Is there enough demand? (BoF)
  • Fashion’s growing interest in recycling clothing (Vogue Business)
TECHNOLOGY
  • 52% of retailers feel ill-prepared to support emerging mobile tech (Mobile Marketer)
  • Facial recognition will be watching and storing your emotions and data (Ad Week)
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Gucci and Saint Laurent face an uphill battle to get green (BoF)
  • Why Levi’s new water strategy represents an ‘evolution in thinking’ (Sourcing Journal)
  • How Copenhagen plans to reach carbon-neutral status in just six years (Fast Company)
  • Amazon under fire for new packaging that cannot be recycled (The Industry)
  • Tiffany & Co releases it’s new sustainability website (CSR Wire)
  • Fast Retailing’s jeans innovation center ramps up efforts to reduce water use (Sourcing Journal)
  • France to prohibit the destruction of unsold stock: who is going to pay for that? (Fashion United)
  • Gore-Tex. Lycra. Could fashion’s next major fabric brand be green? (BoF)
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Hero Cosmetics doubles down on TikTok after results dwarf Instagram’s (Mobile Marketer)
  • Nike, New Balance, and USTA serve up ads celebrating female stars for US open (Fast Company)
  • Benefit and Deliveroo dish out beauty experience (Campaign)
  • PrettyLittleThing wants podcasts to take it from fashion retailer to ‘entertainment brand’ (The Drum)
  • Rihanna plans Savage X Fenty event to be broadcast on Amazon Prime Video (Fashion United)
  • Is WeChat’s growth over? (Walk the Chat)
PRODUCT
BUSINESS
  • Ulric Jerome exists Matchesfashion.com (WWD)
  • ThredUp gets $175 million in funding as resale market continues to boom (Fashion United)
  • Victoria Secret’s parent company’s stock price continues to plummet (The Fashion Law)
  • What Shanghai Tang’s rise, fall and return means for luxury fashion (Vogue Business)
CULTURE
  • The return of the hyper-sexualised male (BoF)
  • Appropriation or appreciation? Unpacking South Korea’s fascination with black culture (I-d)
  • Will Gen Z make non-binary fashion mainstream? (Sourcing Journal)
  • The future of male grooming is gender neutral (Vogue Business)

How are you thinking about innovation? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
business digital snippets Retail sustainability

ICYMI: Allbirds imposes carbon tax on itself, what Fortnite means for fashion, luxury pledges to rebuild Notre Dame

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Allbirds imposed a carbon tax on itself–and your brand should, too [Fast Company]
  • What Fortnite could mean for fashion [Sourcing Journal]
  • Louis Vuitton and Gucci owners pledge more than $300 million to rebuild Notre Dame after fire [CNBC]
  • London retailers hit out at protesters [Drapers]
  • Can recycling fix fashion’s landfill problem? [BoF]
TECHNOLOGY
  • The high-tech new standard for sampling [Drapers]
  • As supply chains get tech savvy, is cybersecurity keeping pace? [Supply Chain Dive]
  • Some apps use design to trick you into sharing data. A new bill would make that illegal. [Vox]
  • We built an ‘unbelievable’ (but Legal) facial recognition machine [NYT]
  • River Island adds AI tech, claiming it can boost sales by 10% [Fashion Network]
  • H&M harnesses AI to test online tailoring feature [Fashion United]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • How to make sustainable fashion people will actually buy [BoF]
  • Clouds on the horizon: What climate change means for retail [Retail Dive]
  • Everlane’s founder vowed to remove all new plastic from the brand’s supply chain by 2021. Now he has to figure out how [Fast Company]
  • Brioni launches ‘zero-mileage’ sustainable menswear capsule collection [Fashion Network]
  • This new technical fabric replaces polyester with banana plants [Fast Company]
  • How green is your lipstick: beauty brands and the fight against plastic waste [The Guardian]
  • PrettyLittleThing partners with recycling app [Drapers]
  • With millennials in mind, outdoor retailer REI doubles down on rentals and used gear sales [Forbes]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Neiman Marcus invests in luxury reseller Fashionphile, proving power of re-commerce and millennials [Forbes]
  • Offering shoppers new experiences isn’t helping: Malls hit with store closure tsunami, falling traffic [CNBC]
  • The complex link between retail and packaging [Retail Dive]
  • 4 reasons why luxury rentals could be a hit with Chinese millennials [Jing Daily]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Welcome to the new era of high fashion and video game collaborations: Inside Moschino and The Sims partnership [Fortune]
  • More than 100 brands collaborated with Game of Thrones. Here are the best stunts [AdWeek]
PRODUCT
  • Top jewellery CEOs say lab-grown diamonds are fashion, not luxury [Fashion Network]
BUSINESS
  • Valentino revenue growth slowed in 2018 [BoF]
  • Why fashion and beauty brands should take note of Pinterest’s IPO [Vogue Business]
  • Kering shares slide as Gucci’s growth slows [BoF]
CULTURE
  • Gen Z crave a world without borders, boundaries and binaries [WWD]
  • With a rapidly growing market, the trans-masculine community Is forging its own path in fashion [Fashionista]
  • Champion accidentally hit the fashion jackpot [Houston Chronicle]
  • China’s sharing economy now includes make-up, but hygiene doubts are hard to brush off [SCMP]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
Campaigns Retail

American Eagle targets Gen Z with sneaker resale pop-up

American Eagle has teamed up with sneaker resale retailer Urban Necessities to host an in-store pop up in NYC in a bid to further engage with its Gen Z clientele and the new ways in which they shop.

The 1,900-square-foot pop up, which is located at an American Eagle Manhattan location, features a selection of streetwear merchandise which includes rare sneakers like the Nike MAG Back to the Future, which retails at $50,000. Other highlights include a Supreme-branded pinball machine and a claw machine, which will give customers the chance of to win $300-$500 worth of merchandise.

For the American Eagle brand this is more than just a temporary retail installation, however. The company has taken a stake in the hip Las Vegas-based retailer for an undisclosed sum, as it hopes to forge a longer-term relationship with the company and continue to tap into the younger consumer shopping behavior.

“Sneakers are about self-expression,” Chad Kessler, global brand president for the American Eagle brand, told Forbes. “Our brand is built on individual style. We are about self-expression. We have the second-largest (U.S.) jeans business (after Walmart). Jeans and sneakers are great pairs. … Urban Necessities has a loyal following and is able to get the most exciting sneakers out there.”

Kessler also said he hopes that eventually in the future, it will open more Urban Necessities stores inside other AE outposts.

The pop up is also part of a series of strategies the brand is developing to continue to attract its core demographic, which includes introducing alternative retail channels that reflect how they now shop more flexibly. Also this year, it announced Style Drop, a clothing subscription service that allows customers to rent up to three items at a time for a flat fee of $49.95 a month.

How are you thinking about retail innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

Categories
Retail technology

MAC targets Chinese Gen Z with interactive store concept

 

MAC Cosmetics is targeting Gen Z consumers in Shanghai, China with the Experience Center, an interactive store that aims to bridge the gap between physical and digital with a host of interactive experiences.

According to the Estée Lauder-owned brand, the store is a result of six months of consumer behavior research into the MAC consumer, including cognitive walkthroughs, focus groups and exit interviews with customers. Results then helped shape the design and experience of the store, including all tech elements that give visitors a more personalized experience.

For example at the store’s entrance, stationary digital screens invite customers to scan their phones to check into MAC’s WeChat mini-program. The program then triggers a variety of functions during the experience, such as instant checkout and product pick up.

Meanwhile in the lipstick section, a smart mirror enables customers to virtually try on 18 different shades in under 30 seconds through augmented reality. Customers can also choose from six eye shadow palettes and customize it to their tastes through the WeChat platform, which is then 3D printed for them. Lastly, an infrared touchscreen interface can scan a shopper’s face and recommend a foundation shade.

Beauty companies are leading the conversation in creating retail concepts where tech plays a major role in allowing consumers an increasingly personalized experience. Last year, brands from Bourjois to CoverGirl unveiled concepts where the try-on experience was further enhanced by tech fixtures, while Sephora often experiments with such features in its many store concepts across the globe.

How are you thinking about retail innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

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Campaigns Podcast social media

Missguided on the relevance of reality TV

Missguided's Jonathan Wall
Missguided’s Jonathan Wall

UK hit reality TV show, Love Island, is all about meeting the customer where she lives, says Missguided’s chief digital officer, Jonathan Wall, on the latest episode of the Innovators podcast by TheCurrent.

“Love Island for our sector, it’s kind of like the annual peak, or the annual Christmas, of [other retailers]. It’s our nirvana. You could not find anything else that’s absolutely spot on to our bullseye customer,” he comments.

Listen here: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Play | Stitcher | RSS

The fast fashion multi-channel retailer saw its sales spike 40% during the show this summer, which all came down to reigniting and re-energizing lapsed customers of more than six months, he notes. Product placement, which is essentially what this was, isn’t new in strategy – but it’s effective when it’s done right, he explains. In this instance, his team designed looks and dressed all of the stars in the show.

Wall’s strategy is focused primarily on relevancy to the shopper, much of which comes from the fact his team internally are those individuals themselves.

“One of the big big advantages we’ve got as a business, is that our customers are actually our team… Our average age in our business is 25, and guess what, our average customer age is also 25. You cannot overemphasize the advantages you get when every single day you are walking amongst your customers. It’s a tremendous advantage.”

Missguided x Love Island
Missguided x Love Island

It’s that laser-sharp focus on who they’re targeting that also let’s Missguided play with partnerships, he adds. The brand launched a collaboration with Playboy this summer that was met with a heavy dose of debate, but ultimately succeeded because of how relevant it was to the shopper it was intended. “It again hit the nail on the head for our customer,” Wall explains.

In conversation with Rosanna Falconer at a FashMash event in Missguided’s hometown of Manchester in the north of England, Wall also shares his views on what’s coming next in influencer marketing, which of the big social channels he’s focused on, and just why he likes to court a little controversy along the way.

Catch up with all of our episodes of TheCurrent Innovators here. The series is a weekly conversation with visionaries, executives and entrepreneurs. It’s backed by TheCurrent, a consultancy transforming how consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
business Campaigns digital snippets e-commerce product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Farfetch’s Neves as the Bezos of fashion, DTC physical stores driving online sales

Farfetch
Farfetch

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Is Farfetch founder Neves the Jeff Bezos of fashion? [Forbes]
  • ‘Shoppable billboards’: DTC retailers say physical stores are driving online sales [Digiday]
  • Amazon reportedly plans to open 3,000 cashier-less stores by 2021 [The Next Web]
  • Is renting designer fashion the future? [FT]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Walmart to put 1M workers in Oculus Go VR headsets [WWD]
  • Ikea’s think tank envisions self-driving cars as rooms on wheels [Quartzy]
  • Forget the new iPhones: Apple’s best product is now privacy [FastCompany]
  • Cryptocurrency is coming for the beauty industry [Fashionista]
  • Amazon launches Scout, a machine learning-powered visual shopping tool [TechCrunch]
  • RFID technology addresses consumer woes over out-of-stocks [WWD]
  • Six AI innovations that could change skincare and beauty [Dazed]
  • US and South Korea just performed the world’s first live 3D hologram call over 5G [IBTimes]
  • Teaching robots to predict the future [The Next Web]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • The environment’s new clothes: biodegradable textiles grown from live organisms [Scientific American]
  • More than ever, our clothes are made of plastic. Just washing them can pollute the oceans [Vox]
  • Skechers delivers 15,000 pairs of shoes to children still in need in Puerto Rico [Businesswire]
  • Where Burberry waste goes now label isn’t burning clothes any more [SCMP]
  • Is certification the answer to fashion’s ethical issues? [LS:N Global]
  • New study shows that Gen Z will strengthen sustainability trend [FashionUnited]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Amazon Storefronts is a new retail hub exclusively for US small businesses [TheVerge]
  • Container Store tracks appointments with voice tech [RetailDive]
  • Italy’s first Starbucks serves cocktails, ice cream, and a side of augmented reality [Mashable]
  • The future of airport retail is hyper-personalization [LS:N Global]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Victoria’s Secret’s Pink revamps loyalty with mobile app [RetailDive]
  • Gucci’s surprise new Instagram account truly revitalizes its beauty offering [i-D]
  • How Nordstrom reinvented its retail loyalty program [Digiday]
  • The epic ‘Game of Go’: a real-time experience showcasing Nike’s latest React technology [TheDrum]
PRODUCT
  • Bespoke tailoring in the athleisure age: how China changed Savile Row [SCMP]
  • How De Beers learned to love lab-grown diamonds [BoF]
BUSINESS
  • Walmart is borrowing luxury’s playbook to gain an edge on Amazon in fashion [Quartz]
  • Store investment pays off as Harvey Nichols profits soar [TheIndustry]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
Editor's pick product technology

Tommy Hilfiger launches smart clothing that rewards users per wear

Tommy Jeans Xplore

Tommy Hilfiger has launched Tommy Jeans Xplore, a line of smart chip-enabled clothing that rewards consumers for each wear. In doing so, it is gamifying an experience for its brand fans and ambassadors with immediate rewards, which include discounts and exclusive experiences.

Items in the collection each have an embedded bluetooth low-energy smart tag provided by Israel-based Awear Solutions, which connects the physical product to a dedicated Tommy Jeans Xplore app. Once activated, the app acts as a direct line of communication to the consumer and based on a points system, allows the user to receive rewards and experiences in real time, based on garment wear.

“We’ve always been at the forefront of digital innovation, using technology to deliver what our customers are looking for – unique experiences and instant gratification,” said designer Tommy Hilfiger to WWD. “Tommy Jeans Xplore is the next evolution of our vision, reaching consumers where they are and inviting them to be a part of the brand experience.”

Rewards include concert tickets through a partnership with Live Nation and exclusive access to the brand and its events, such as visits to the Tommy Archives and invites to its runway shows. Users can also redeem product discounts or convert their earned points into monetary donations to charities.

Tommy Jeans Xplore

The line, which is currently available only in the US, consists of 23 items of clothing across women’s, men’s and unisex designs. This includes hoodies, t-shirts and accessories such as a crossbody bag and a backpack.

Tommy Hilfiger has made strides in establishing itself as an industry innovator investigating how to personalize engagement with its young, digitally-savvy audience across the board. Last year’s launch of a shoppable image recognition app during its LA runway show demonstrated the brand’s commitment to inserting digital moments at every consumer touchpoint.

Engaging with consumers through technology, among other innovations, was the main topic of discussion by Tommy Hilfiger and chief brand officer Avery Baker at this year’s British Fashion Council fashion forum, curated and produced by TheCurrent. Stay tuned for an upcoming TheCurrent Innovators podcast episode with Baker, which will be recorded live in New York City in August.

Tommy Jeans Xplore
Tommy Jeans Xplore

Categories
Campaigns Editor's pick technology

Bjo?rn Borg disrupts World Cup with blockchain and AR LGBTQ experiences

Bjo?rn Borg AR experience at the World Cup 2018

Swedish underwear label Bjo?rn Borg is taking a stand on LGBTQ rights, including marriage equality, with two digital initiatives that coincide with the start of the World Cup 2018 in Russia.

During the first match of the football championship, Russia versus Saudi Arabia, brand fans were encouraged to place an augmented reality “tifo” – the word for large organised visuals displayed by football crowds – via an online platform. Upon visiting the platform, users could place a visual of a gay couple kissing above the crowd, either on their desktop, or pointing their phones towards a TV playing the match. In the illustration, the couple is sporting painted stripes that represent each country’s flags, with a strapline that reads, “Love Will Win Tonight.”

Users can then share the visuals on social media, while the brand has developed web ads with similar messaging. The launch during the first match is particularly symbolic as in Russia, promoting homosexuality is considered propaganda, while in Saudi Arabia being gay is considered a crime that can be punished by death.

Although the AR experience will only be available throughout the football championship, it lives under a larger digital platform where the brand is further cementing its stance through the use of blockchain technology. Marriage Unblocked allows any user to propose, exchange vows and get married digitally by storing their information on a blockchain ledger, which can either be made public or remain anonymous. Users who participate, many of which are from countries where gay marriage is not legal, get a certificate for their digital marriage. Although not legal, the symbolic feature creates an emotional experience that allows those who have been denied the right to marriage to express their love for one another.

Bjo?rn Borg has long used the conversation around love to promote a more inclusive society, as well as tying the topic to their brand messaging in general. In 2011, a TV spot featured a traditional wedding ceremony with a twist; and 2015, it launched an online game where weapons included holographic kisses and heart-shaped soap bubbles, showcasing that love conquers all. The brand, much like cross-industry counterparts like Lush, has long understood that taking a stand on a major topic that matters to them is a pivotal strategy when engaging with younger customers who wear their values on their sleeves.