Categories
Campaigns Editor's pick Retail technology

5 brands using gamification to drive shopping

Nike Reactland

The global gaming market is experiencing rapid growth, with an estimated valuation of $180bn expected by 2021, according to Newzoo. 

It is currently dominated by titles such as Fortnite, a free multiplayer game with 250 million users and $2.5m in daily revenue. Streaming platform Twitch, which accounts for 54% of gaming video content revenue, has also been highly successful due to its interactive network of both players and spectators. 

Though relatively limited, fashion brands and retailers have been experimenting through collaborations or campaigns that nod to such popular references. Louis Vuitton had a campaign featuring Final Fantasy XIII’s character, Lightning, as the new face of its SS16 collection for instance. More recently, Moschino launched a new collection with Sims, featuring garments with Sims motifs. A virtual hoodie was also released so players could dress their avatars in designer clothing in the game itself. 

What’s becoming more interesting however, is the number of brands turning to “gamification” rather. This refers to “the integration of game mechanics into an internal business process, website, or marketing campaign”. It’s a market that was valued at $6.8bn in 2018 and is estimated to rise to $40bn by 2024, according to market research firm Reportlinker. 

Its growth has been driven by increased demand for new customer experiences, as well as broader access to smartphone devices. And its success has meant brands and retailers are increasingly jumping in on the action in a bid to use ‘play’ as a way to encourage shopping. 

From driving discovery and engagement, to building brand advocacy and loyalty, here are five examples of those using gamification as part of the shopping journey. 

Kenzo: Building exclusivity through gaming

Kenzo Shopping League game
Kenzo Shopping League game

French luxury brand Kenzo launched a gamified e-shopping experience last year to promote the release of its new Sonic sneaker. Restricted to just a limited number of players, the aim of the initiative was to highlight the exclusiveness of the product. Getting a turn at playing was not only difficult in the first instance, but once in the game, users had to virtually defeat other opponents in an effort to then get access to buy one of the 100 exclusive pairs of sneakers. The campaign challenged consumers and added excitement to the shopping journey for those lucky enough to even get the chance to hit the purchase stage. 

Nike: Enabling user-testing through role play

Nike Reactland game
Nike Reactland game

Nike released a virtual environment called Reactland in Shanghai last year for the launch of its ‘React’ shoe. The game allowed users to test the shoe’s new sole cushioning technology in a unique digital environment. Customers could wear the shoes and run on a treadmill that was connected to a digital character on screen. This enabled them to thoroughly test the product’s durability by virtually climbing buildings and running through simulated streets. The game fueled consumer confidence in the product, leading to 48% of the players purchasing it.

Coca-Cola: Driving sales via virtual incentives

Coca-Cola incentive game
Coca-Cola incentive game

Coca-Cola created a supermarket game in Beijing and Singapore to catch consumers’ attention at the point of purchase in-store. Shoppers could connect to their mobile to the drag-and-shoot game, which involved successfully throwing virtual ice cubes into a glass of coke. Successful completion of the game resulted in prizes such as Coca-Cola discounts or loyalty points. The brand successfully targeted consumers at the moment of intent, and influenced them to pick Coca-Cola over competitors. 

Repeller: Bringing play to e-commerce

Repeller 'Play' website
Repeller ‘Play’ website

Popular fashion blog, Man Repeller, recently launched a new e-commerce website called ‘Repeller’, which utilizes gamification in order to enable consumers to shop in a discoverable way. The website is divided into two sections: a normal shopping site and a play side. The play side is an amalgamation of aesthetic imagery and quirky videos, reminiscent of video gaming user interfaces, but this time embedded with directly shoppable products, including handbags, earrings and sunglasses. The somewhat wacky website is being pushed as an opportunity to drive discovery and encourage users to spend more dwell time on the site.

Lancôme: Pushing awareness through scavenger hunts

Lancôme pop-up store
Lancôme pop-up store

Beauty brand Lancôme teamed up with Alibaba to create an augmented reality game in Hong Kong, along with a pop-up store, to celebrate Chinese New Year this year. The app featured an AR scavenger hunt where consumers could win limited edition products and gifts by finding and scanning Lancome’s signature beauty product, Genifiques. If they captured three pictures on the hunt, they were then able to wish for any Lancôme product they desired through the app, and be in with a chance of winning it. The game successfully drove awareness of the brand through consumer generated content and brought excitement during a key time of year in the region.

How are you thinking about retail innovation? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
data digital snippets e-commerce mobile product social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Pokémon Go, McQueen’s DNA, luxury’s executive changes, AI, VR and more

McQueen pure human - digital snippets
Alexander McQueen’s DNA turned into leather in designer Tina Gorjanc’s Pure Human project

If there’s one thing that’s grabbed everyone’s attention this past fortnight, it has of course been Pokémon Go. The augmented reality mobile game has reportedly gained as many users as Uber and Tinder, topped Twitter’s daily users, and started seeing people spend more time with it than in Facebook. It also caused Nintendo’s share price to increase by more than $7bn.

We published a great piece looking at what retailers can learn from it in a broader location-marketing sense.  Also worth reading is this story tracking the retail invasion of Pokémons, via Racked, and another looking at why retailers should care about Pokémon’s forthcoming ads.

Beyond that, the news to know in the fashion, digital comms and technology space this week (and there’s a lot of it!), spans everything from an experiment with DNA in textile design to the plethora of changes at the helm of the industry’s luxury houses, the impact artificial intelligence might have on brands, not to mention how we’re faring with virtual reality so far…


  • Fashion that gets under the skin – designer creates leather prototypes grown from Alexander McQueen DNA (as pictured) [NY Times]

  • Luxury fashion: a year of big moves [The Industry]

  • Amazon Prime Day: Wow… but not yet a fashion must-buy [Trendwalk]

  • What Amazon could learn from Yoox Net-a-Porter, the “world’s biggest luxury fashion store” [Quartz]

  • Fashion apparel retailing in the age of artificial intelligence [WWD]

  • Luxury brands get off to an awkward start with virtual reality [Glossy]

  • Is a holographic fashion show for VR clothing the future? [The Creators Project]

  • The store of the future: physical retailers must stage experiences, embrace omnichannel and harness data [BoF]

  • 5 ways shoppers are using mobile to make purchase decisions, according to Google [Fashionista]

  • Sephora is driving mobile sales with Tinder-like features and digital mad libs [Ad Week]

  • Stores must learn to think like Facebook [BoF]

  • Warby Parker is offering Snapchat-exclusive sunglasses [Techcrunch]

  • Birchbox tests Snapchat for customer service – turns to revamped video and voice calling feature [Digiday]

  • Why advertisers are forking over big bucks for custom Snapchat lenses [Ad Week]

  • Snapchat is looking at a way to recognize objects in your snaps and serve you related ads [Business Insider]

  • New study says people are more likely to buy from brands that use virtual reality [Ad Week]

  • Luxury brands embrace digital, but still wary of programmatic [The Drum]

  • Using an algorithm to figure out what luxury customers really want [HBR]

  • Amazon is developing a 3D modelling system to solve online clothes shopping’s biggest problem [Quartz]

  • How the future of fit could spell the end of retail returns [Retail Dive]

  • Back to bricks and mortar: how e-commerce has embraced the real world [The Guardian]

  • Where machines could replace humans—and where they can’t (yet) [McKinsey]

  • Confessions of a fashion start-up founder: ‘Fashion tech is the Wild West’ [Glossy]

  • 3 need-to-know live streaming apps in China (and how bloggers & brands are using them) [WGSN]

  • Payments firm Klarna adds Lyst to its collection [Reuters]

  • How valuable is trend forecasting in the post-internet age? [NJAL]

  • These acrylic nails double as an Oyster Card [PSFK]
Categories
Editor's pick film technology

Virtual reality hits #LFW, River Island shoppers given access next

This post first appeared on WGSN.com/blogs

RiverIsland_virtualreality

Something innovative tied to fashion week was, for once, truly applicable to the everyday consumer at Somerset House yesterday.

River Island unveiled a virtual reality film created with designer Jean-Pierre Braganza using Google Cardboard. This makeshift headset (created out of, you guessed it, cardboard) can essentially be built by anyone. All it then needs is a smartphone slotted into the front of it and an app downloaded to showcase the content.

For River Island shoppers from tomorrow, however, any item purchased from the Design Forum Jean-Pierre Braganza collaboration collection, will also arrive with a flat-packed version of Google Cardboard included, ready to build themselves.

As Mary McClenahan, marketing manager at the retailer told us during the press launch: “This was about making technology accessible to a wider market. It’s a bit of fun really, and fashion should be fun.”

She said the aim was to test the boundaries of technology, but do so in a way that made sense for the “tech-savvy younger generation”. Downloading an app is no longer a barrier to content for consumers, making this sort of experience all the more relevant to them, she explained.

The content in question, sees the user able to direct a Kingfisher into a futuristic mechanical structure where a model wearing the new collection is to be found. Once she’s located, an augmented reality experience is also offered; providing a fluttering image of the Kingfisher atop of the user’s existing, real-world surroundings. They’re encouraged to snap an image (the Kingfisher hovering on a shoulder or over a glass, in our case) and then share it with their social following.

A Google representative said this was a very early version of what virtual reality is likely to become. The almost ‘analogue’ nature of Cardboard is, after all, a relatively primitive, albeit accessible, way to experience it. Over the next 12 months we’ll see significant inroads made into much more immersive and interactive experiences, he said, with the open-source setup of the technology making experimentation all the more possible.

VR in general is trending at fashion weeks so far this season, with Rebecca Minkoff and Tommy Hilfiger both having captured their A/W 15/16 shows in 360-degrees, ready for future release. With experiential marketing as the focus, there’s enormous opportunity for brands to make serious inroads with VR as a consumer engagement ploy up ahead.

Check out some of our pictures and a video from the Jean-Pierre Braganza experience below.

photo 3

photo 1

IMG_7822

photo 2

Categories
Blocks e-commerce social media

Charlotte Olympia opts for gamification in #spintowin Christmas campaign

charlotte olympia1

Footwear designer Charlotta Olympia is introducing a festive slot machine on its website during the first 12 days of December in a bid to drive new traffic to its online store.

Fans will be able to spin to win iconic pieces from the brand’s seasonal collection, including Glitter Kitty ?ats, Jingle Bell Dolly platforms, Holly Pandora clutch and Frosty pouch, as well as a flurry of classic styles like the Dolly platforms, Pandora clutch box, spiderweb earrings and more.

Spin to win

All they have to do is get three matching styles on the virtual machine over the course of three tries.

Bonnie Takhar, president of Charlotte Olympia, told WWD: “During a busy holiday season with a competitive retail landscape…brands are focused on new-customer acquisition. We wanted to ensure that this word-of-mouth campaign brings new customers to Charlotte Olympia.”

The campaign is being pushed via social media with a countdown bauble each day alongside the #spintowin hashtag.

Categories
social media Uncategorized

Lancôme engages fans via Betty Boop Facebook app

Lancôme has turned to Facebook in France to push its new Hynôse star mascara with a fun application starring cartoon character Betty Boop.

The initiative offers fans the opportunity to create their own cover picture alongside Betty (as shown above), as well as a game to participate in that provides them with the opportunity to win the new product.

Featuring a board of sparkling spots hiding one of the mascaras, the game cleverly encourages users to provide more personal information about themselves to the company.

To enter, they have to first provide basic details including name and email. They then get three chances a day to try and uncover the product. They can, however, request Betty’s help, which results in having to reveal their address for another three goes. Next they have to provide their telephone number and date of birth, which reduces the canvas size substantially, hinting at where the mascara might lie. If all fails, the game encourages users to return the next day.

There is also a series of tutorials about how to apply 24 different shades of eyeshadow to get one of three Betty looks.

The mascara is additionally being promoted with a short film starring Betty Boop alongside model Daria Werbowy. In it, the two are seen behind-the-scenes on a movie set having a conversation about their lines and how best to look the part – by applying the new mascara naturally. “Just say it with the eyes,” says Betty.

 

[via Web&Luxe]

Categories
Uncategorized

Video: Louis Vuitton’s All Aboard Games animation

Very cute animated video just released from Louis Vuitton, providing a “fantastic and surrealist voyage” inside a game case:

 

It was created by III Studio and said to be about “the universe of games, how they pass the time, evolve from one move to the next in different systems of transition”.

Look out for everything from chess, dominoes and backgammon to cards, dice and roulette, each featuring iconic Louis Vuitton prints and logos.

[New,Now]

Categories
Uncategorized

New Roger Vivier line inspires digital puzzle

Roger Vivier has created an online puzzle as part of the launch surrounding its new Prismick accessories line.

Based on the late designer’s love for assembling collages, the simple game invites users to reconstruct an image of one of the collecion’s handbags by dragging surrounding tangram-like shapes into its shell.

It is housed on the brand’s website, which is also designed to reflect similar geometric patterns, tying in with the overall theme of the collection, as conceived by current creative  director, Bruno Frisoni (and as pictured below).

“Pumps and bags which play with fluctuating geometry,” reads an update on the Roger Vivier Facebook page. “A jigsaw puzzle in three dimensions.”

Categories
Uncategorized

Chanel offers activity area for kids on exhibition microsite

Hidden alongside the more sophisticated pages of the Culture Chanel microsite – an online accompaniment to the Parisian brand’s current Beijing exhibition – is an interactive area called Kids’ Corner.

Within it sit two classic offline activities for children, translated for the web.

First up is a virual colouring book, which provides users with drawings of seven iconic Chanel items including a tweed jacket, brooch and clutch, and a choice of 36 different shades with which to fill them in with. Each picture is also available to download for printing.

And then there’s a memory game based on flipping over and matching up pairs of cards. Unsurprisingly, the face of each one features another series of classic Chanel symbols such as buttons and a bottle of Chanel No.5 fragrance. The back of each card is stamped with the interlocking Chanel C’s.

As Fashionista said, “we guess [it] is technically for children, but we like it too”, and that’s the interesting part. As gaming has opened up to a far wider audience (71% of females aged 20-49 now play games, according to IGN Entertainment), there’s been an increasing move towards the idea of game mechanics within campaigns, and I believe there’s enormous potential for further application within the fashion industry.

More thoughts to follow, but this piece from a few months back is worth re-reading in the meantime: Gaming as fashion’s jackpot.

Categories
Uncategorized

Gaming as fashion’s jackpot

H&M on Goldrun

There was a nice piece from The New York Times last week about how gaming can be applied to the fashion industry. It suggests e-commerce sites take inspiration from the likes of Angry Birds and Farmville, which welcome a total of three billion hours a week in play time.

It highlights initiatives from brands including Dunhill, Marc Jacobs and Jimmy Choo, and suggests point-scoring, scavenger-hunting, clock-countdowning ideas to engage with consumers and ultimately encourage loyalty.

This notion of brand gaming is something I’ve been reporting on for quite a while, not least because it’s been one of the most mentioned subjects alongside “mobile” and “location” at conferences around the world over the past year.

So here are some additional thoughts:

  • 200m of Facebook’s 500m+ users now log on to play games
  • Despite what might initially spring to mind, it’s not just for teenage boys – 71% of females aged 20-49 now play games, according to IGN Entertainment
  • The nature of gaming has changed. Where it was once a solitary bedroom activity for children, it’s now a shared experience – either with others online, or with the family in the living room space
  • Technology is allowing gaming to be more immersive – traditional controls are on the out, while social media and television are integrating too, said Jack Wallington, head of industry programmes at the IAB
  • Consumers are attracted by generating stats, gaining points and flattering their own egos, according to Joel Lunenfeld, CEO of ad agency Moxie Interactive – accordingly, by nature, gaming encourages greater loyalty
  • Foursquare co-founder Dennis Crowley said the theory behind his location-based social service is framed around incentivising via a game overlay. By “checking in” to different venues, users can gain various badges, which Crowley referred to as “digital candy”
  • Goldrun is another app worth looking at in this space. H&M ran a campaign designed to drive traffic and increase sales last November, where users in NY could hunt for virtual items, take a picture of them and in so doing, receive a 10% discount off their next purchase
  • Nike Grid is another example of brand gaming – athletes won points for running between phoneboxes and calling in to prove their achievements. Over 15 days last October, 12,500 miles were run across London, 62,000 phonecalls were made to the freephone hotline and 4,705 people liked the Grid on Facebook
  • Even Burberry’s Art of the Trench site could be considered to have somewhat of a gaming underlay. You go out, take a picture of yourself in your trench coat and wait to see if it’s deemed good enough to be posted online. If it’s not, what’s the betting numerous consumers go and try again – competition at its finest.