Categories
digital snippets e-commerce film social media

Digital snippets: Louis Vuitton, Victoria Beckham, Dior, Shazam, Amazon

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Louis Vuitton promotes “prostitution chic” in controversial short film (as above) [BrandChannel]
  • Dior parades exclusive lip colours via one-day Twitter activation [Luxury Daily]
  • Amazon’s confused foray into fashion tries to please too many women [Pando Daily]
  • Stefano Gabbana’s Twitter tirade after tax evasion ruling on sale of D&G [Daily Telegraph]
  • Augmented reality, intelligent mapping: fashion and tech collide in China [JingDaily]
  • That’s So 2012: have Pinterest, Foursquare and Groupon peaked? [Inc]
Categories
digital snippets Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Neiman Marcus and Foursquare, blogging, vlogging and the tablet at retail

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

  • Neiman Marcus to give away handbags in Foursquare hunt [Mashable]
  • Haul videos: marketing to teens through teens [FT]
  • Retailers focus on tablets [WSJ]
  • How street style changed the frontier of fashion photography [The Cut]
  • Fashion bloggers and their agents [NYTimes]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce Uncategorized

Digital snippets: New Balance, Levi’s, David Yurman, Wrangler, Shiseido

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital this week:

 

  • New Balance’s augmented reality campaign (as above) invites New York runners to find virtual batons [Mashable]
  • Levi’s postpones UK portion of new Go Forth campaign following riots [AdAge]
  • David Yurman uses Foursquare to push Summer in the City collection [Luxury Daily]
  • Gilt Groupe unveils its men’s e-commerce site Park & Bond [Forbes], debuts with virtual fitting tool [Just-Style]
  • Shiseido launches e-commerce site in US market [PR Newswire]
  • Stores begin offering electronic versions of receipts [NY Times]
  • Luxury-goods investor Carmen Busquets invests in social networking design business Lookk.com [Telegraph.co.uk]

I’m now away for another 10 days, so there won’t be any posts for a while. Expect a mega digital snippets update on my return!

Categories
technology Uncategorized

Ashton Kutcher the tech investor

There’s an interesting piece on the New York Times’ technology pages today about actor Ashton Kutcher as “a smart early investor in some of the most-talked about internet start-ups”.

Off the back of his appearance at TechCrunch Disrupt earlier this week, it references the fact he has capital in companies ranging from Foursquare and Path, to Skype, Flipboard and most recently Airbnb.

“I have a bunch of interesting and really smart people that I sit with and talk to quite frequently because of the investments I’ve made, and between their networks and mine, I get to see things really early,” he said.

The piece also references his involvement on a creative level: “He has been known to drop into General Assembly, a co-working space in Manhattan that is the home of one of his investments, the fashion site Fashism. He advised Path on ways to let users comment and give feedback on each others’ photos.”

Well worth a read: An Actor Who Knows Start-Ups

Categories
Uncategorized

Facebook Deals to come with £50,000 media spend

Brands in the UK hoping to provide Facebook users with access to special offers through the site’s new deals service are going to have to spend £50,000 on banner advertising to do so, according to Brand Republic.

Facebook Deals, which launched in beta in the UK in January and was originally free, already has the likes of Debenhams and Mazda as partners.

It enables users to check in using the social networking site’s location feature, Facebook Places, and find nearby offers.

Facebook declined to comment.

With the surge in deal marketing at present (see my post from yesterday), it seems like quite an odd move to me – brands could easily turn to Foursquare or the forthcoming Groupon Now instead. Having said that, Facebook’s userbase is now over 600m, Foursquare’s is perhaps more like 6m; perhaps that’s worth £50k after all?

Categories
mobile Uncategorized

Deal or no deal? Tech companies dive deeper through location, brands approach direct

I spent a great deal of my weekend catching up on stories from SXSW. There were a lot.

Particularly fascinating was the read on “deals” as this year’s buzzword. Check out this article from Advertising Age about Groupon influencing a whole host of other services – new deal-orientated projects from Google, Loopt and SCVNGR are all mentioned as well as upgrades to those belonging to Facebook and Foursquare.

It’s fair to say the paths of location networking and deals have truly collided (though it’s arguable whether they were ever actually distinguishable in the first place). What’s perhaps more interesting, is the further news of Groupon’s real-time mobile service.

Groupon Now, which will launch in April, will help people find deals nearby to them based on two different options: “I’m Hungry” and “I’m Bored”.

Or in other words, where location was going into deals, now deals are going into location.

Adding to the mix no less, is the fact it’s not just tech companies working out how to benefit in this world. Brands are bypassing these third party apps and reaching out to consumers directly too.

Last week, Gap, which hit the headlines with its sellout Groupon offer last summer, launched its own deals initiative.

Through gapmyprice.com, consumers could name how much they wanted to pay for a pair of men’s khakis. By clicking on “let’s make a deal”, they made an offer for one of 18 styles retailing for between $49.50 and $59.50. Gap then presented its deal in return which shoppers could either accept or counter before receiving a final price.

According to the site’s winners tab, offers tended towards $35-$45 for a $49.50 pair. All rather along the lines of TV game show Deal or No Deal (as pictured), albeit without the £1m prize balancing the other end. Of course, gaming is another area so intrinsic to this world, as I wrote about here.

Chris Donnelly, an executive partner in Accenture’s retail practice, told AdAge: “You get to this space we’re in right now where, even though the economy is picking up, consumers still expect things to be on sale. That leaves the retailer to come up with ways to give discounts without completely eroding margins.”

“[Gap’s deals initiative] is a better way of price discrimination, because you’re trying to tailor the price to each individual. A coupon is a very blunt tool. If I give everyone a 30% off coupon, some would have bought full price and some still won’t buy,” he said.

Does it have staying power? Potentially. But if you ask me, it’s sites like Groupon (it’s also worth checking out this chart documenting its rise to potential $25bn IPO) and Foursquare that are the ones to watch most closely.

Categories
Uncategorized

Gaming as fashion’s jackpot

H&M on Goldrun

There was a nice piece from The New York Times last week about how gaming can be applied to the fashion industry. It suggests e-commerce sites take inspiration from the likes of Angry Birds and Farmville, which welcome a total of three billion hours a week in play time.

It highlights initiatives from brands including Dunhill, Marc Jacobs and Jimmy Choo, and suggests point-scoring, scavenger-hunting, clock-countdowning ideas to engage with consumers and ultimately encourage loyalty.

This notion of brand gaming is something I’ve been reporting on for quite a while, not least because it’s been one of the most mentioned subjects alongside “mobile” and “location” at conferences around the world over the past year.

So here are some additional thoughts:

  • 200m of Facebook’s 500m+ users now log on to play games
  • Despite what might initially spring to mind, it’s not just for teenage boys – 71% of females aged 20-49 now play games, according to IGN Entertainment
  • The nature of gaming has changed. Where it was once a solitary bedroom activity for children, it’s now a shared experience – either with others online, or with the family in the living room space
  • Technology is allowing gaming to be more immersive – traditional controls are on the out, while social media and television are integrating too, said Jack Wallington, head of industry programmes at the IAB
  • Consumers are attracted by generating stats, gaining points and flattering their own egos, according to Joel Lunenfeld, CEO of ad agency Moxie Interactive – accordingly, by nature, gaming encourages greater loyalty
  • Foursquare co-founder Dennis Crowley said the theory behind his location-based social service is framed around incentivising via a game overlay. By “checking in” to different venues, users can gain various badges, which Crowley referred to as “digital candy”
  • Goldrun is another app worth looking at in this space. H&M ran a campaign designed to drive traffic and increase sales last November, where users in NY could hunt for virtual items, take a picture of them and in so doing, receive a 10% discount off their next purchase
  • Nike Grid is another example of brand gaming – athletes won points for running between phoneboxes and calling in to prove their achievements. Over 15 days last October, 12,500 miles were run across London, 62,000 phonecalls were made to the freephone hotline and 4,705 people liked the Grid on Facebook
  • Even Burberry’s Art of the Trench site could be considered to have somewhat of a gaming underlay. You go out, take a picture of yourself in your trench coat and wait to see if it’s deemed good enough to be posted online. If it’s not, what’s the betting numerous consumers go and try again – competition at its finest.