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Campaigns film

Dollar Shave Club breaks down gender stereotypes in Get Ready campaign

Dollar Shave Club, Get Ready, Grooming, Bathroom Rituals, video, campaign, advertisment
Get Ready

Dollar Shave Club is focusing on breaking down gender stereotypes in a new campaign that marks its biggest video production to date.

Get Ready, as it’s called, is a short film from the subscription razor company that shows 26 different bathroom sets and their accompanying consumers, each demonstrating a particular grooming ritual.

Included is a man enjoying a luxurious bubble bath in a pink-tiled bathroom, for instance, or a woman shaving her bald head. The aim of the video is to show customers who are far more varied than the archetypes the shaving industry usually portray. 

Each of the 26 scenarios shown are all based on the responses of a consumer survey. 

The film also sees a cameo from the brand’s CEO, Michael Dubin, who in once scene puts toilet paper in his underwear and views himself expectantly in the mirror. It’s a move that only reinforces the deliberately not-so-serious tone that made the very first Dollar Shave Club video, Our Blades Are F***ing Great., such a success.

With the Get Ready campaign, it is continuing to demonstrate its distinctive marketing voice, while also emphasizing its creative independence after being acquired by Unilever for an estimated $1 billion in 2016. In a strategic decision to not seek help from an external agency, the company employed its in-house marketing team for the entire creative process. 

The finale of the video sees all characters unite (breaking down bathroom doors, climbing over tiled-walls) and leave the purposefully obvious TV-set design. The caption reads “Welcome to the Club”, which then cleverly shows all the different bathroom essentials the company can now provide its customers with, following its expansion beyond razors and into other grooming essentials.

Categories
Campaigns film

Kenzo explores cultural identities in mini feature film

Le Renard Bleu, Kenzo, Luxury Fashion, Fashion Film
Le Renard Bleu

Kenzo has released a 20-minute film that brings to life the Fall 2018 collection in a cinematic composition of music, performance and dance, in support of the second edition of its Folio publication.

Entitled Le Renard Bleu, the fashion film is inspired by the chilling Icelandic fable The Blue Fox, which in its original form gives a haunting account of human nature. Kenzo’s re-interpretation is directed by artist Partel Olivia, who decided to expand beyond the initial cultural identities and incorporate ancient Dogon and Japanese folktales, which give a portrayal of the fox as an animal susceptible to chaos and of a cunning nature.

The resulting intertwining of different cultural heritage lies at the heart of the brand’s creative output, with the atmospheric video chronicling the journey of the fox as a spirit animal, portrayed by street dance artist Qwenga. He is accompanied by a musical composition which was especially created through a collaboration between musician Midori Takada and LA pop-artist Lafawndah, whose spontaneous creative output imagines her own conversation with the animal. 

This is the first time in 20 years Takada, has created music; a decision that she traces back to her love for the brand (she wore Kenzo for her very first musical performance) and the compelling nature of the fox in her own culture. 

The tone of the music as well as the performance is at first pensive but soon becomes tenser, with scenes capturing fragmented sequences of dance, performance, and moments of stillness, all accompanied by the dramatic musical interlude. 

Ultimately, the focus is on the clothes however, which act as strong visual cues while also being seamlessly integrated into the overall atmosphere of the video. Fittingly, the Fall collection, entitled La Collection Memento N°2, blurs the line between Western and Eastern fashion iconography, paying homage to Japanese and Hawaiian style elements. 

Le Renard Bleu was released on the brand’s YouTube channel, with the print publication of Folio available soon on the Antenne Books website. This magazine is rooted in the brand’s aspiration to show and explore different aspects of culture and cultural identities, which in this second installation are prominently formed by the cultural aesthetics of the East, as per the latest collection. It follows the publication of Folio #1 from April 2017, entitled Gidi gidi bu ugwu eze — Unity is Strength

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Editor's pick film technology

Prada looks at automated future in new sci-fi video series

Prada Nylon Farm
Prada Nylon Farm

Prada has released a ‘futuristic fairytale’ film series celebrating its nylon backpack first launched in 1984, by referencing a series of next generation technologies.

Nylon Farm, as the four-part project is called, features a flock of cyborg sheep, in a nod to Philip K Dick’s sci-fi novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Alternate reality technology and an automated manufacturing system is at play to harvest the synthetic fleece, but the ideals of such artificial intelligence is seemingly disrupted by a level of human emotion that comes into the scene.

“It may all seem perfect, but something in this place has gone beyond the normal production processes. A series of strange anomalies have interrupted the regularity of the Farm and required the launch of an investigation. Will following protocol be enough in this story?” reads the write-up.

A post shared by Prada (@prada) on

While Vogue refers to it as an example of Miuccia Prada directing an episode of Charlie Brooker’s Black Mirror, the intention from Prada is to symbolize the brand’s technological innovation on the one hand, but also its ability to respect the brand’s history, on the other.

The nylon that has become a signature of the house was originally sourced from factories making parachutes for the military. It’s this quest for newness from Miuccia that is so referenced.

The four episodes were filmed at the brand’s industrial headquarters in Tuscany, the first one of which launched this weekend past. The following three will be released on June 1, 4 and 9 across the brand’s social media.

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business digital snippets e-commerce film Retail social media Startups sustainability technology

ICYMI: LVMH’s digital strategy, feathers in fashion, the McQueen documentary

Proenza Schouler
Proenza Schouler

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Decoding LVMH’s digital strategy [BoF]
  • Is the use of feathers in fashion any more ethical than fur? [Fashionista]
  • The McQueen documentary tells the story of the people who carry his legacy [Vogue]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Why Nordstrom is betting on high-touch tech [Fortune]
  • Avery Dennison and SoftWear Automation to create digital supply chain for manufacturers [SupplyChainDigital]
SUSTAINABILITY
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • How Sephora built a beauty empire to survive the retail apocalypse [CBInsights]
  • This is how a brick-and-mortar store can thrive in the age of Amazon [NYMag]
  • Urban Outfitters launches third-party marketplace, tests self-checkout [RetailDive]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Nike sells out of Facebook Messenger sneaker drop in less than an hour [RetailDive]
  • Givenchy and Stella McCartney score on Instagram at Royal Wedding [WWD]
  • Victoria’s Secret is still advertising to women like it’s 1999 [Bloomberg]
  • Esprit’s Instagram posts are now shoppable [FashionUnited]
  • This Ikea print ad is designed to put you to sleep [CreativityOnline]
  • Do influencers need regulating? [BoF]
BUSINESS
  • Balenciaga is now the fastest-growing label at Kering? [Harper’s Bazaar]
  • LVMH invests $60 million into fashion platform Lyst [HypeBeast]
  • Richemont clinches takeover of Yoox Net-A-Porter [Reuters]
  • Can the Model Alliance Respect program make a difference? [Vogue]
Categories
Campaigns Editor's pick film

Human rights foundation highlights modern slavery with unboxing video stunt

Unboxing the Truth - Thomson Reuters Foundation
Unboxing the Truth – Thomson Reuters Foundation

The Thomson Reuters Foundation (TRF), which works with journalists and organizations to bring to light human rights abuses and corruption, is tapping into the millennial behaviour of unboxing videos to highlight one of its causes.

To do so, the foundation teamed up with Jacques Slade, a YouTube personality known for videos where he unboxes sneakers to a 851,000-strong audience, to highlight the plight of modern slavery.

Slade’s video begins with a disclaimer explaning that he was sent a mystery box and viewers should stick around to learn a really important message. He then proceeds to open the package, to reveal a high-end shoe box where the word “Humanmade” is replaced by “Slavemade” once it is fully opened. As the pair of shoes is revealed so are stats about modern slavery, which can be found on the shoe’s tongue, laces and soles.

Stats disclose that slavery still exists in 161 countries and counting, while also highlighting that less than 2% of slaves will ever be rescued. Slade then shows the shoe’s dust bag, in which a printed letter addressed to him and his viewers explains that they do not expect people to stop buying sneakers, but rather to stop and ask themselves: “What is the human price of the products you buy?”

Slade, whose core audience is men aged 13-24, explains that he was initially contacted by a creative agency on behalf of an “unspecified nonprofit organization” to take part in a video about forced labour, and that was the extent of what he knew prior to recording the video.

The stunt aimed to tap into an audience who is highly engaged about their passion, which in this case is owning and cherishing limited-edition footwear by the likes of Nike and adidas.

As part of the campaign, the organization is asking for donations towards its fight against slavery and human trafficking. Donations will go towards funding media coverage, training and mentoring journalists in specific geographies with a high prevalence of slavery, and bringing frontline activists to the Trust Conference where they would learn new skills.

Unboxing the Truth - Thomson Reuters Foundation
Unboxing the Truth – Thomson Reuters Foundation
Categories
Campaigns

Bonobos campaign features 172 models in diversity push

Bonobos Project172
Bonobos Project172

Bonobos is thinking about diversity in a big way in its latest campaign – hiring 172 different models to show off all the variations of its pants.

The resulting 30-second spot features all shapes, sizes, ages and ethnicities. “However you fit, Bonobos fits you,” reads the tagline from the direct-to-consumer menswear company that sold to Walmart last year for $310 million.

“There’s a really interesting conversation to be had around the evolution of masculinity, and the power of diversity and inclusivity,” Micky Onvural, co-president of the brand, told AdAge. The company has been exploring “how Bonobos as a brand could not just have an impact on the men that [it sells to] and how they see themselves, but have an impact on the conversation.”

Bonobos Project172
Bonobos Project172

She added that things have become even more topical in the context of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movement in terms of the way that men should look at themselves and behave.

This Project172 campaign was created by Observatory Marketing, formerly known as CAA, and is reportedly the brand’s costliest to date. It will air in Austin and Chicago and be complemented by a push across radio, digital and social media. There’s also a 90-second video and a seven-minute documentary featuring interviews with many of the models talking about their definition of masculinity. It follows the brand’s ‘Role Model’ campaign in late 2017.

Categories
Campaigns Editor's pick

The North Face celebrates female explorers with campaign to inspire future generations

The North Face "Moves Mountains"
The North Face “Moves Mountains”

The North Face has launched its first-ever campaign focusing on women and celebrating the achievements of female explorers around the world.

Move Mountains is an initiative that aims to empower the next generation of explorers by highlighting the stories of courageous and adventurous women, and by partnering on a multi-year outdoor adventure collaboration with Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA).

The campaign features a series of short videos telling the stories of trailblazing women including alpinist Hilaree Nelson, climbers Ashima Shiraishi and Margo Hayes, and ultrarunner and activist Fernanda Maciel. The North Face is also featuring women who are paving the way in their respective fields including NASA scientist Tierra Guinn Fletcher, musician and activist Madame Gandhi and women’s rights advocate, America Ferrera.

According to Tom Herbst, global vice president of marketing at The North Face, the theory behind Move Mountains was simple: if women and girls could see female explorers represented more widely, it will create a new generation of female role models.

As part of the initiative, The North Face has made a commitment to represent women equally in all advertising, social media and content moving forward.

The Move Mountains initiative is also being applied to the internal business with increased investment in women’s product design, a renewed focus on employee development and an ensured closure of the gender pay gap on the athlete team. The brand will also be expanding their Explore Fund grants to $750,000 with a new program focused on enabling female exploration.

Inspiring a new generation of explorers is a cornerstone of the campaign and The North Face is collaborating with GSUSA to enable women to further push the boundaries. The collaboration includes the creation of 12 new Girl Scouts outdoor adventure badges, with skills ranging from mountaineering, backpacking, hiking and trail running.

Categories
Campaigns Editor's pick Retail technology

Ikea promotes AR app launch with YouTube game series

Ikea Matchers Keepers
Ikea Matchers Keepers

Ikea is promoting the launch of its Place AR app on Android with “Matchers Keepers”, a YouTube mini series where real life couples or housemates pair up to see how well their tastes align.

The idea is to diffuse any potential arguments that typically arise during Ikea store visits with a fun and interactive game, encouraging people to reach consensus on their furniture and decorating choices. The initiative thus uses the Ikea Place app, which first launched for iOS in September 2017, and uses augmented reality to enable users to “see” what the furniture looks like in place in real life.

Hosted by lifestyle blogger Caroline Solomon, each short episode promoting the Android launch focuses on one duo who go through a series of challenges using a piece of furniture – such as a couch or lamp – and the app to complete them.

One challenge, for instance, sees two housemates individually place the couch virtually in a room, to challenge whether they agree on its placement. If their placements match, they can take the real item home.

“When we first launched Ikea Place, we gave our customers the opportunity to ‘try before you buy’ for the first time since Ikea was established,” said Michael Valdsgaard, leader digital transformation at Inter Ikea Systems. “Customers truly appreciate that and we are now helping them to create a better life at home using our AR technology. Today’s release is about bringing the ease of Ikea Place to over 100m Android devices.”

The Android launch also announces an added feature – working with computer vision startup GrokStyle, the app now allows users to photograph a piece of furniture and receive a suggestion of a similar Ikea item, with a link to buy it.

Earlier this year, Ikea CEO Jesper Brodin spoke at the World Economic Forum about how major shifts in technology, such as the development of artificial intelligence and digital realities, has been the catalyst for the retailer to begin creating connected experiences for their customers.

Categories
business digital snippets film product Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Rethinking returns policies, beauty’s AI future, Gucci on gun control

AI impacting beauty
AI impacting beauty

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • Why fashion retailers are rethinking their returns policies [Glossy]
  • How artificial intelligence is changing the future of beauty [HuffingtonPost]
  • Why Gucci decided to support gun control [BoF]
  • How Everlane is building the next-gen clothing brand [FastCompany]
  • Cracking luxury’s customization challenge [BoF]
TECHNOLOGY
  • 10 breakthrough technologies 2018 [MIT Technology Review]
  • How Google Zoo is thinking about machine learning [TCDaily]
  • Diamond industry turns to AR to attract wedding-wary millennials [Glossy]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • Is this the year that fashion will pay attention to the planet? [ThePool]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Target CEO: Online shopping alone won’t cut it, retailers also need great stores [CNBC]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Maybelline asks followers whether it should quit Snapchat [AdAge]
  • Chanel unveils Instagram feed for beauty devotees, plans for another beauty pop-up in West Hollywood [LA Times]
  • First short film produced by Giorgio Armani unveiled during MFW [WWD]
  • Why paid memberships are the new loyalty [BoF]
  • Automat creates online hive for beauty sector chatbots [RetailDive]
  • Fashion company loses social media followers over same-sex ads [BBC]
PRODUCT
  • This company is using AI to make personalized skincare [FastCompany]
BUSINESS
  • UK fashion industry to take hardest Brexit hit [BoF]
  • Topshop boss Sir Philip Green ‘is in talks to sell his High Street empire to Chinese textiles giant’ [DailyMail]
  • Charlotte Olympia files for bankruptcy [Fashionista]
  • Tod’s turns to ‘Factory’ project to keep pace with fast-moving fashion market [BoF]
  • LVMH and Kering launch website for model welfare [FashionNetwork]
Categories
Editor's pick film social media

Diesel hides digital “easter eggs” in latest campaign film

Diesel S/S18 campaign video
Diesel S/S 18 – “Keep the World Flawed”

Diesel’s campaign video for the spring/summer 2018 season, titled Keep the World Flawed, features hidden clues that engage viewers across multiple digital platforms.

Encouraging a life lived in a less than perfectionist manner, the satirical video tells the story of a boy and a girl who met after they both chose to get rid of physical flaws. It was directed by François Rousselet and developed by Publicis Italy.

Throughout the creative work, various digital “easter eggs” can be found hidden. On pausing certain frames, viewers can find web addresses and social media handles, such as @wantedsocks, which leads to an Instagram page selling mismatched Diesel socks, for instance.

Meanwhile, the spot’s fictitious restaurant, called Bluffet, is backed by a real website at Bluffet.com, where in collaboration with Buzzfeed’s Tasty, three video recipes aim to fuel flawed behaviour. The final clue, Layover.it, sends users to a flight engine platform that suggests booking real flights with as many layovers as possible.

The spot, which is accompanied by a print ad photographed by Florence & Nicholas, continues the brand’s “Go with the Flaw” campaign strategy, which aims to celebrate imperfections.

Layover.it
Layover.it

To hear about Diesel’s approach to challenging conformity, listen to The Current Innovators’ podcast episode with Diesel’s CEO of North America, Stefano Rosso.