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business data Editor's pick technology

Infographic: Exploring European consumer views on connected technology at retail

connected technology retail week
The European Connected Consumer, by Retail Week

While interest and uptake in connected technology in retail is growing – from wearables to smart fitting rooms – levels of consumer usage and acceptance fluctuate from country to country across Europe, according to Retail Week’s latest report.

It compiled research from seven territories, including Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK, as per the infographic below.

Titled The European Connected Consumer, and written in association with Osborne Clark, the study outlines the fact European consumers should not be targeted as one homogenous group by retailers. Understanding behavioural nuances presents great opportunities to businesses whether interacting with consumers in retail, digital health, transport, logistics or emerging innovations, it explains.

“By discovering the game-changing shifts in European consumer behaviour we believe your business will be better equipped to navigate the digital revolution and drive future innovations,” writes Laura Heywood, commercial editor of Retail Week Connect.

As an integral part of the consumer’s need to be constantly ‘on’, there’s a growing appetite for connected wearables, for instance. Fitness trackers take the lead, with Italy, the world’s second healthiestcountry according to Bloomberg, showing the highest take-up (48%), followed closely by Spain (47%) and Germany (36%). Moving forward, trackable devices will need to seamlessly blend into busy lifestyles, as demonstrated by Levi’s’ and Google’s Project Jacquard jacket, it outlines.

The UK meanwhile shows the lowest adoption of fitness tracking and virtual health technologies – 68% use neither, compared with 59% across Europe. The report indicates this could be a result of public concerns following recent high profile data breaches, such as TalkTalk’s cyber attack in October.

One of the areas to have shown the biggest improvement and uptake is payment and shopping technologies, exemplified by the rise of contactless cards. These have been widely adopted across Europe, with 45% of respondents having used them in the past three months. Spain has the highest usage at 57% and Italy the lowest at just 26%.

Alternatively, only a minority of consumers in the UK (33%) and the Netherlands (40%) use mobile payments apps like Apple Pay. This may soon change as big retailers such as Tesco in the UK and Inditex in Spain, which owns Zara and Pull & Bear among others, launch their own mobile payment apps in the near future.

connected technology retail week

Physical retail is still generally the preferred mode of shopping in many regions otherwise, sitting at 69% compared to 31% who chose online. Belgium shows the most conservative results, with an 80% majority preferring to shop in store, largely due to heavy retail regulations that make it harder for advanced technologies to enter the country, according to analysis from Euromonitor International.

Meanwhile, consumers across territories were unanimous in their biggest concern when shopping online, 54% voted security. They ranked it higher than convenience, speed and reliability. French consumers are most keenly aware of the importance of security (71%), while the UK closely followed at 63% and Germany at 59%.

There’s a willingness to share personal data however, with 53% of Europeans overall being open to it. The Italians were most confident at 66%, followed by the Brits at 61%. German respondents revealed the most reluctance, with 59% stating they are not comfortable sharing data, compared to 47% across Europe.

The report suggests that businesses that are transparent about data usage, stating how it will be shared with partners or allowing the customer to personalise their profile, manage to remove anxieties and establish trust.

In exchange, 78% of Europeans expect differentiated pricing, while additional perks such as discounts and personalised offers based on search and purchase history also help boost a willingness to share for 82% of them.

As for the future, the report outlines the fact concepts such as 3D body scanning and virtual fitting rooms are becoming more accepted features of physical stores, while there is somewhat hesitant appetite for drones and driverless vehicles to become logistic realities.

More than half of European consumers (57%) are excited by the concept of virtual fitting rooms, for instance, although the UK scores low (42%) in comparison to countries such as Spain (82%) and Italy (70%).

Opinion is more divided when it comes to drones – less than half of Europeans (46%) say that if drones were to be used in parcel delivery they would consider this a positive development. Italy is the most favourable to it (67%) followed by Spain (60%). At the other end of the scale, and once again revealing some hesitation regarding innovation, is the Netherlands and the UK, where 68% and 64% respectively say they would not consider drone delivery as positive.

You can download the full report here: The European Connected Consumer.

Categories
mobile technology

Mobile wallets: French shoppers say “non merci”

mobile wallets
The French are becoming avid m-commerce shoppers but they’re less fond of smartphone payments technology

Samsung Pay celebrated its first birthday last month and hit 100m transactions worldwide (from the seven countries in which it was available). But in a world where m-commerce is surging, there still seems to be a lot of consumer resistance to smartphone-based mobile wallets in some countries. That’s despite many shoppers in those countries tapping their debit and credit cards on contactless payment terminals with increasing regularity.

A new survey illustrates this perfectly, It shows that the French are becoming avid m-commerce shoppers but it seems but they’re not too fond of smartphone payments technology.

The survey, by CCM Benchmark and reported by eMarketer.com shows that French shoppers are buying fashion via their smartphones in increasing numbers (34% out of a survey group of 1,000 adult consumers), booking travel (40%), buying cultural items (that’s books and music to you and I, with 33% of respondents buying them), and consumer electronics/household appliances (23%).

They’re also researching on their phones with 65% of them using those phones in-store to check out products and deals and take photos.

But mobile payments? Not so much. The French are saying a big “non!” to smartphone/smartwatch payments at the moment. Most m-commerce transactions in France are still pretty ‘analogue’ with consumers preferring to tap their card details into the checkout form on a website or app.

In fact, only 7% of digital buyers had taken advantage of the ever-increasing number of mobile wallet solutions out there, which is a low number given that m-commerce shoppers might have been expected to be more mobile wallet-friendly than the average online shopper.

Around 27% of respondents did say they were ‘ready’ to use a mobile wallet but that doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll take action any time soon. And as many as 56% said they weren’t willing to pay that way.

Why is this? Unfortunately, the survey didn’t say. Maybe it’s security concerns, or maybe setting it up in the first place just seems too fiddly.

What often influences take-up of such innovations is a compelling piece of technology that makes it a no-brainer, or another change that drives fast adoption. In the UK, the ability to pay using contactless on London’s cash-free bus system was key for driving people to accept contactless payments in general.

In France, perhaps smartphone and operating system makers hoped their state-of-the-art devices had done enough to become that sort of catalyst. But not so.

At least the problem isn’t global. Those Samsung Pay figures and a survey this summer of 2,000 consumers in the US and UK by mobile engagement specialist Urban Airship, have showed a more favourable outcome for mobile wallets.

Urban Airship said 54% of US/UK consumers had used systems like Apple Pay and also see them as key for staying updated on sales, offers and coupons as well as boosting their interest in loyalty programs. Importantly too, 67% of millennials have used them and they’re also more popular among high-income households.

Perhaps the message from France to Apple, Google, Samsung, and the numerous banks now offering mobile wallet tech isn’t so much “non merci” as “s’il vous plaît être patient!” Maybe they’re just not ready for this giant tech leap forward… yet.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday. 

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media technology

Digital snippets: Brexit fallout for fashion, big brands hit Reddit, Uniqlo’s digital identity

sibling_brexit
Sibling’s designers showing their support to stay in the EU during their menswear fashion show ahead of the referendum

We’re back with another round-up of everything you might have missed in fashion and technology news (and beyond) over the past week or so. Needless to say, Brexit has been the big subject as the industry tries to weigh up what such a result means for them going forward. We’ve highlighted some of the must-read pieces on the subject. Beyond that there’s an update on the value of Reddit for brands, insight on Uniqlo’s evolving digital identity and to cheer everyone up, Amazon’s new #saysomethingnice campaign…


  • Britain votes to exit EU, unleashing untold damage on the fashion industry [BoF]

  • Brexit: Retail chiefs must lead in the creation of a prosperous future [Retail Week]

  • What Brexit means for British fashion brands [Esquire]

  • Here’s why Brexit might not be so bad for… Burberry [Yahoo]

  • E-commerce winners and losers in the wake of Brexit [Glossy]

  • Why big brands are suddenly getting cozy with Reddit [AdWeek]

  • How fashion brands are starting to design like tech companies [Co.Design]

  • How Uniqlo plans to establish a digital identity [Glossy]

  • Amazon Fashion launches #saysomethingnice social campaign [The Industry]

  • Online fashion curator FarFetch, which links shops to customers, grows in China [SCMP]

  • Nicola Formichetti on subcultures, digital life & advertising on Pornhub [Oyster]

  • Augmented reality bot brings virtual lipstick try-on to Facebook Messenger [Forbes]

  • Target shoppers love this superfan account [Racked]

  • Snap, swipe, like: The mobile future of fashion retail [BBC]

  • The evolution of the mobile payment [TechCrunch]

  • E-commerce is supposedly capital intensive. So why do the companies that raise the least tend to do the best? [Pando]

  • How social media turned into shoppable media [The Industry]

  • Pinterest adds a shopping cart and visual search to challenge Amazon [AdWeek]

  • Refinery29 is building a 10-person Facebook Live team [Digiday]

  • Meet the new wave of wearables: stretchable electronics [Fast Company]

  • Iris Apfel emojis are happening with Macy’s [Fashionista]
Categories
e-commerce Editor's pick mobile

Peak Performance runs GPS-based virtual outdoor campaign

peakperformance_magichour_01a

Outdoor sports brand, Peak Performance, is running a digital campaign that sees fans able to win clothing and other goods at set times of day while out in the wilderness.

The Magic Hour, as the initiative is called, sees virtual pop-up shops appearing in certain rural locations chosen for their views just before sunrise and sunset. Included are mountain tops, a golf course and a lighthouse on a small island. The aim is to appeal to cyclists, golfers, ramblers, runners, trekkers and walkers.

Creative agency Perfect Fools Stockholm developed the mobile web experience, viewable at CatchMagicHour.com, which displays the shop location, distance to it, opening hours, a collection catalogue and how many items are left to claim. It relies on smartphone GPS to detect when users are at the right location, only showing them a preview of the collection if they’re not.

peakperformance_magichour_03b_clean

Robin Salazar, online marketing and e-commerce manager at Peak Performance, said: “The Magic Hour is a beautiful time of day and we want to encourage people to experience that time at fantastic locations. The virtual pop-up shops are an added incentive to experience sunrise or sunset and bridge the physical digital divide.”

The campaign is being pushed online as well as via PR in Austria, France, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan and UAE.

Categories
social media

Vero Moda supports Movember with moustache selfies campaign in-store

VeroModa_mo

Vero Moda is pushing a fun hashtag campaign in its stores to help raise awareness for Movember this year.

The Denmark-based label has placed a series of moustaches in all its dressing rooms allowing shoppers to snap ‘selfies’ of themselves and then share the results over Instagram using #veromodamo.

Reads a sign in its windows: “Come into the Vero Moda dressing room and support the men in your life.”

Every photo shared will see €0.10, up to €35,000 donated to the Movember Foundation to help raise awareness of prostate and testicular cancer. The results are also being hosted on mo.veromoda.com.

VeramodamoVerodmoda_Instagram

 

Categories
Uncategorized

GPS treasure hunting with Timberland

Timberland is running a GPS-enabled treasure hunt to push its new Earthkeeper footwear range across Europe.

The ‘Trail of Heroes’ campaign is open until June in Berlin, Brussels, London, Madrid, Milan and Paris.

It encourages participants to find hidden treasure (prizes such as clothing from the brand and a trip to Iceland) off the back of coordinates sent to their GPS device.

Geocaching.com/trailofheroes is a campaign site created by brand experience specialists BEcause and Groundspeak, reports Campaign.

Categories
e-commerce Uncategorized

Lanvin launches European e-store

Lanvin has launched its new European e-commerce site at www.lanvin.com/e-lanvin/UK-FR.

Designed to offer customers a “unique new experience in an intimate and welcoming environment that replicates the ambience of its famous boutiques”, it offers products from across a broad range of categories split up into comprehensive divisions.

Women incorporates ready-to-wear, handbags, shoes, accessories, ballerinas or jewellery, and men, ready-to-wear, bags, shoes, sneakers and accessories.

Each product featured is zoom-able to full screen.

Under “Hot Picks”, there are must-haves for the season across bags, shoes and jewellery. So too is there then a page for brides, one for gifts – complete with the brand’s famous porcelain dolls as well as cards decorated with Alber Elbaz’s sketches – and another featuring exclusives.

Lanvin launches European e-store

Lanvin has launched its new European e-commerce site at www.lanvin.com/e-lanvin/UK-FR.

Designed to offer customers a “unique new experience in an intimate and welcoming environment that replicates the ambience of its famous boutiques”, it offers products from across a broad range of categories split up into comprehensive divisions.

Women incorporates ready-to-wear, handbags, shoes, accessories, ballerinas or jewellery, and men, ready-to-wear, bags, shoes, sneakers and accessories.

Each product featured is zoom-able to full screen.

Under “Hot Picks”, there are must-haves for the season across bags, shoes and jewellery. So too is there then a page for brides, one for gifts – complete with the brand’s famous porcelain dolls as well as cards decorated with Alber Elbaz’s sketches – and another featuring exclusives.