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Editor's pick film social media

Behind the emotion (and pressure) of the John Lewis Christmas ads

#bustertheboxer
Buster the Boxer – John Lewis’ 2016 Christmas campaign

Emotional advertising is far more powerful than rational advertising, according to the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising. In fact, it’s twice as likely to generate profit, with that profit effect building over the years, based on the data.

There’s no better example of a brand that has achieved that than John Lewis, which year after year puts out a huge Christmas campaign that tugs on the heartstrings of the United Kingdom in a bid to kick off the trading season. Last year, Buster the Boxer trended globally within 45 minutes of launching – to date it has 65 million views.

Speaking at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity this week, the team behind those efforts shared insights on what they’ve tried to achieve, what the pressure of doing so is like and just how important authenticity is in getting it right.


On starting out with ‘Always a Woman’ in 2010

James Murphy, founder and CEO of adam&eveDDB: “John Lewis has a unique place in the UK landscape – it’s admired and trusted. But there was a very clear problem – there was masses of trust, but not enough desire.. When you talked to people they say they love it and it’s fantastic, but they weren’t acting. So we thought, why don’t we try and tell and capture the feeling that customers have for the brand; the relationship.”

Craig Inglis, customer director at John Lewis: “I felt it was very powerful at that point as a storyline within the business. It felt like a sleeping giant of a brand… But it sells things that are inherently emotional – that you put in your home or that you wear. Always a Woman really did cause quite a stir when it broke.”



On the pressure to keep delivering ever since

Richard Brim, chief creative officer of adam&eveDDB: “The pressure is absolutely immense. There are two points to it; there’s the industry, but more importantly there’s the public. People start talking about it now – in the run up to it they start guessing the music, what it’s about, everyone you meet will suggest ideas and send letters. The biggest pressure is the fact that the country cares for it. It’s got this place of heralding the holiday season. When it drops, everyone is talking about it. That terrifies me. The industry I can deal with, but the public you can’t disagree with.


On the growth beyond just TV strategy

Inglis of John Lewis: “When we started in 2010 with Always a Woman, there was no social strategy, just a TV ad. Then we had the snowman [in The Journey], and started noticing social was playing a part. By the time we got to the Bear and the Hare [in 2013], we started doing products too. There was demand there. The purpose is not to over-commercialise it, or overleverage it, but we spend lots of time thinking about where else it can sit. We’ve extended into other areas like books, into stores and windows, we’ve had games and apps. That takes more effort than the film in a sense because we’ve got to keep it fresh for our audience and where they want to engage with it. That said, if we started with an idea that we can make merchandise from, we’d get it wrong – the idea of the ad still comes first.”

The Bear and the Hare campaign from John Lewis in 2013 included an audiobook
The Bear and the Hare campaign from John Lewis in 2013 included an audiobook

On the power of emotion

Brim of adam&eveDDB: “We’re very aware of the [power we’re working with]. There was a definite shift in the emotion we wanted to tap into last year with Buster the Boxer. With what was going on in the world, we realised maybe we needed to play with a different emotion; something a bit more fun and a bit more celebratory. It was a very conscious decision on that.”

Inglis of John Lewis: “We think very carefully about getting the right balance of hitting an emotional chord. We hold that tension very carefully. It can’t just be hype; it has to feel real. That is entirely instinct; there is no science to that.”


On competition and authenticity

Inglis of John Lewis: “[With five or six others now vying for best ad each Christmas], it’s certainly improved the quality of advertising in the UK, which can only be a good thing. There’s been some brilliant work done in the last few years. The key is that others don’t try and do ‘a John Lewis’ – it has to be a story that resonates; that’s true to their brand. [What we put out] has to be a reflection of what John Lewis as a business is. If it wasn’t, people would see through it.”

Murphy of adam&eveDDB: “You have to have certain values you can springboard off. You can’t perfume a pig.”


On the long-term effect on the business

Inglis of John Lewis: “[The Christmas campaign] drives the highest return of any of our marketing. We see profit of about £8 for every £1 spent. So it’s not just for fun, it’s commercial. But we also get an enduring impact; it rallies people within the business. It gets them excited and up for quite a long trading process. It has this corralling effect.”

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business social media sustainability

Binge shopping leads to emotional hangovers for consumers, Greenpeace study shows

The excitement of shopping doesn't last too long according to a new study by Greenpeace
The excitement of shopping doesn’t last too long, according to a new study by Greenpeace

Compulsive shopping isn’t only bad for the planet, it’s also not making consumers in Europe and Asia very happy, according to a new report from Greenpeace, released ahead of this week’s Copenhagen Fashion Summit.

The environmental organisation’s study shows fashion shoppers regularly overspend on new clothes, with the excitement of doing so often turning into guilt after less than a day.

In all the countries surveyed (including China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Italy and Germany), most consumers admitted to owning more clothes than they needed, with many of them having multiple items in their wardrobes that have never been worn.

Some consumers are more affected than others – 41% of all Chinese consumers are found to be excessive or compulsive shoppers for instance, with 59% of them saying they can’t stop themselves making impulse buys even though they realise they are buying too much. A quarter of respondents in Germany, a third in Italy, 42% in Hong Kong and a staggering 46% in China admit that they often buy more clothes than they can afford.

While the average consumer buys clothes around once or twice a month, the excessive shopper rarely goes more than a week without purchasing something new. In China again, 31% said they feel empty, bored or lost when not shopping, and in Hong Kong and Taiwan, 50% of consumers revealed they sometimes hide or conceal their purchases from others out of fear of negative reactions.

Unsurprisingly, one of the big triggers is social media, with platforms like Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook or WeChat in China, driving shopping mania, especially among young digitally connected consumers. Other influencing factors include celebrity endorsements, peer pressure and sales promotions.


That insight comes off the back of a study last year from McKinsey & Company, which showed that annual clothing production exceeded 100 billion for the first time in 2014. It also highlighted that consumers now keep clothing items for about half as long as they did 15 years ago, and that nearly three-fifths of all clothing produced ends up in incinerators or landfills within a year of being made.

The Greenpeace research further highlights that the majority of shoppers – ranging from 65% in Germany and Italy to 48% in China – think the excitement of buying fashion wears off after a day or less, while a third say they feel even emptier once it does so.

“Our surveys show that binge shopping is followed by an emotional hangover – made of emptiness, guilt and shame. People start to realise they are trapped in an unsatisfying cycle of cheap, disposable fashion trends and that their overconsumption does not lead to lasting happiness. This should serve as a warning to companies and advertisers that promote the current fast fashion model. Fast fashion clothing brands should radically change their business model by shifting focus away from high volume production towards quality and durability,” said Kirsten Brodde, project lead of the Detox my Fashion campaign at Greenpeace.

The campaign has committed 79 global textile brands and suppliers to ban hazardous chemicals from their supply chains by 2020. In order to protect the planet further, it is also calling for a change in the way we consume clothing.

“In today’s broken fashion system, companies spend billions of ad dollars to sell us false dreams of happiness, beauty and connection tied to shopping products. But we would be much happier if fashion labels provided clothes that are high quality, durable companions for life, and offered support for customers to care, share and repair our clothes. We and the planet deserve nothing less,” Brodde added.

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film

Georg Jensen continues storytelling push with short video series for Valentine’s Day

Georg Jensen's #MarkedwithLove campaign
Georg Jensen’s #MarkedwithLove campaign

Georg Jensen has released a series of short videos for Valentine’s Day, under the header #MarkedwithLove.

The aim, according to the brand, is to celebrate the enamoured moments between people on Valentine’s day with films that captures real moments of love for others and oneself.

The first love story in the four-part set, named Someone You Love, sees a young woman dancing in front of a mirror. She pulls faces, plays with her hair and smiles to herself, very much like you would do with a date, before she puts a silver pendant necklace on. The tagline “For all the ways you Valentine” follows.


The next, named Light Up The Love (in reference to the Georg Jensen candles featured in the video), begins with a couple making dinner together. Clearly happy, laughing and joking, both of them bring candles over to a table, for what appears will be a romantic meal. However, a twist in the ending shows the man raising a glass to a computer screen where he is video chatting his partner. Again, it finishes with the tagline “For all the ways you Valentine”. The last two videos will seemingly follow.


Georg Jensen has been heavily focusing on storytelling in its campaigns of late, using human emotion to leave a lasting impact with its viewers. For autumn 2016, it launched an ad focused on how capable women are, called You Can Never Be Too Much You. Starring award winning director Susanne Bier, Motocross rider Behnaz Shafiei, world champion boxer Cecilia Brækhus, award winning comedian Sarah Kendall, and the world’s best female chef Dominique Crenn, it pushed back against the idea that being too loud or strong or provocative are negative traits.

By Annabelle Brown

Categories
data e-commerce Editor's pick

High intensity interval shopping? eBay’s ’emotional tech’ pop-up says yes

eBay has opened the world’s first store powered by emotion just in time for Giving Tuesday and also revealed just how stressful Christmas shopping can be.

Based at 93 Mortimer Street in London, the concept space is only open for two days (Nov 29-30). A “do good, feel good” experience, it encourages visitors to “unwrap” what it means to give thoughtfully this Christmas.

In biometric booths it uses intelligent bio-analytic technology and facial coding to (hopefully) remove outside stresses as people browse a selection of items from the retailer’s Giving page. The idea is that the tech identified which items create the biggest emotional connection. The ‘shoppers’ then get a report on the three items that they connected to the most.

There’s also an “emotional tapestry” centrepiece covering 20 sq m that translates shopper emotions in real time. US firm Lightwave provided the facial coding tech and ambient biometric sensors and also worked with eBay on research giving the whole thing a bit of context.

The two conducted a biometric study that suggested Christmas gift shopping can increase heart rate by 32%, which is similar to taking part in a long race. 100 people were fitted with biometric wearables that measured their emotional responses as they shopped. A massive 88% of them experienced tachycardia.

Equally bad (for their wallets if not their health), most lost interest after 32 minutes and hit what eBay called the “wall of disenchantment”. That’s when shoppers settle for anything just to avoid having to shop for any longer, so cue large amounts of money wasted on unwanted gifts.

The company is suggesting we should treat Christmas shopping like we do exercise, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would become “HIIS”. So we shop for a bit then rest. Not sure how practical that is, unless you’re web-browsing at home, but maybe if you choose stores that have plenty of cafés nearby, it might just work.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday.

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digital snippets e-commerce Editor's pick product social media technology

Digital snippets: Mid-tier blogger power, the robotics opportunity, Alibaba’s anti-counterfeiting feud

midtierbloggers

After a week refreshing the mind and the soul at Futuro in Ibiza (an awe-inspiring experience), we’re back with a round-up of everything you might have missed in fashion and technology news (and beyond) over the past fortnight or so. Read on for highlights from mid-tier bloggers and robots to Alibaba, Victoria’s Secret, Levi’s, WeChat and more…


  • The power of the mid-tier blogger [Racked]

  • How robots can help fashion companies drive business efficiencies [BoF]

  • Inside Alibaba’s anti-counterfeiting feud [Associated Press]

  • Why Victoria’s Secret won’t be mailing out any more catalogues [AdWeek]

  • Aerie refused to Photoshop its ads for two years and sales spiked [Mashable]

  • Project Jacquard: Google and Levi’s launch the first ‘smart’ jean jacket for urban cyclists [Forbes]

  • Fashion shake-ups go beyond designers to the C-suite [NY Times]

  • Fashion industry faces disruption from outside — and from within [FT]

  • Why lux brands love Line [Glossy]

  • With 92% of luxury brands on WeChat, here’s how they can step up their game [Jing Daily]

  • How four creative directors are using Snapchat [Glossy]

  • How Instagram’s new feed will impact brands and influencers [BoF]

  • With subscription beauty boxes, rules of e-commerce don’t apply [WSJ]

  • Why buy buttons on Pinterest and Instagram haven’t taken off for retailers [Digiday]

  • Brands want to predict your behaviour by mining your face from YouTube videos [Motherboard]

  • Chatbots won’t solve everything [BoF]

  • For the first time, Google is bringing retail ads to image search [AdWeek]

  • Shoptalk: Pondering the store’s future in an age of web buying [Associated Press]

  • Keep calm and keep shopping – how elections impact retail sales [The Conversation]

  • Why dynamic pricing just doesn’t work for fashion retailers [LinkedIn]

  • I tested Rent The Runway’s new Unlimited service. My satisfaction was… limited [Pando]

  • What does ‘innovation’ in retail look like? 8 leaders weigh in [Retail Dive]

  • Online retailers should care more about the post-purchase experience [HBR]

  • Does Kendall and Kylie’s game actually sell clothes? [Racked]

  • EasyJet’s new smart shoes guide travellers as they wander through new cities [JWT Intelligence]

  • MIT researchers create 3D-printed fur, opening up “a new design space” [Dezeen]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Diesel’s ads on Pornhub, Chanel’s Instagram battle, why the fashion world hates wearables

Your round-up of the latest stories related to fashion and technology…

diesel

  • Why you’ll soon be seeing Diesel ads on Grindr, Tinder and Pornhub [i-D]
  • Chanel may have just won a battle for the Chanel Instagram account [The Fashion Law]
  • Why the fashion world hates wearables [Co.Design]
  • High tech innovation wears well at Ralph Lauren [Forbes]
  • Burberry debuts on Apple TV with menswear fashion show [Mashable]
  • Misha Nonoo will skip fashion week to follow a consumer calendar [Fashionista]
  • Everlane’s starting a private Instagram account for new products [Digiday]
  • How Belstaff maintains a strong defense against counterfeiters [Stores]
  • How Urban Decay gets its 4.1 million Instagram followers to shop [Digiday]
  • Victoria’s Secret furthers organic storytelling mastery via Angel-endorsed Snapchat takeover [Mobile Marketer]
  • Crocs bows to critics, deletes David Bowie tribute tweet [Brand Republic]
  • Meet the female CEOs running fashion’s biggest brands [Fashionista]
  • What fashion needs to know about cyber security [BoF]
  • Shoppers are choosing experiences over stuff, and that’s bad news for retailers [The Washington Post]
  • Do ‘digital flagships’ deliver? [BoF]
  • The myth of the physical versus digital retail battle [WWD]
  • Why the social media ‘buy button’ is still there, even though most never use it [The Washington Post]
  • Inside the hidden world that handles your holiday returns [Wired]
  • Retail writes an obit on flash sale sites [Marketplace]
  • The blogosphere pays off more than ever [WWD]
  • What’s Grindr’s new agenda? [Dazed]
  • Instagram and the watch world [NY Times]
  • Why women aren’t buying smart watches [Racked]
  • Apple acquires Emotient, start-up that reads emotions from facial expressions [Fortune]
  • Why visual search will become a marketing obsession in the coming years [AdWeek]
  • These vibrating yoga pants will correct your downward dog [Fast Company]
  • 30 under 30 retail and e-commerce 2016: meet the millennials changing how we shop [Forbes]
Categories
data film

Which UK Christmas ad really grabbed us? You might be surprised

Marksandspencer

Christmas ads used to be all about selling product. Brands and retailers would dust off the Rat Pack Christmas album, add in some sparkly frocks and set the scene at a dinner party, office party or some other kind of party and there it was. Today though, those Christmas ads are spectaculars that have to build brand awareness, do some social/environmental good and set social media buzzing.

And they have to be emotionally engaging. So I was particularly interested in ICM Unlimited’s webcam survey that tracked consumer reaction to the ads from the UK’s big high street retailers.

They used webcams as part of a survey to capture emotions on faces during a screening of six festive ads. ICM Unlimited found that The Art of Christmas from M&S came top, just beating Sainsbury’s Mog ad as the most emotionally engaging ad. M&S was higher up the emotional engagement scale than any of the other ads tested using ‘facial coding’ and also beat Tesco, John Lewis, Asda and Boots.

ICM Unlimited and CrowdEmotion rated six ads based on a score for happiness, surprise, puzzlement, disgust, fear and sadness. Emotional engagement for the ads was compared against explicit appreciation – did audiences say that they enjoyed the ad? Based on the results, retailers fell into in one of four categories: Love It, Hate It, Needs Work or Guilty Pleasures.

Tom Wormald, director at ICM Unlimited, said: “In surveys, people claim they don’t respond to – or are not influenced by – TV advertising. But using a webcam we can prove we go on an emotional rollercoaster when watching commercials, meaning the ads are influencing our attitudes and behaviours in ways we often don’t even realise.

“The M&S ad sat firmly in our ‘Guilty Pleasures’ category because although people claimed not to like it, the emotional response shows that it brings a lot of ‘happiness’. Sainsbury’s triggered a positive ‘puzzlement’ response driven by curiosity about the storyline. A fast-paced but disjointed narrative from Boots registered a sense of ‘fear’ – it made people feel uncertain. We even detected a sense of ‘disgust’ in responses to some ads, possibly because viewers might feel manipulated by some parts of an advert.”

This is what ICM said about each one:

M&S – The Art of Christmas: Winner in ‘emotional engagement’ – happiness everywhere

This came up top as the most emotionally engaging advert, filled with extravagant visuals and using Mark Ronson’s Uptown Funk as the soundtrack. Upbeat and colourful, peppered with images of gift giving, feasting and excitement, this ad closes nostalgically with fleeting images of Morecambe & Wise. The ad really takes off with shots of children waking then jumping excitedly on beds. Here the facial expressions were all about happiness – 133% higher than the norm of the ads tested.

Sainsbury’s – Mog’s Christmas Calamity: Curiosity and the cat make this a favourite

High explicit appreciation and emotional engagement contributed to the success of this ad. Viewers experienced ‘fear’ at the start because when people see cute animals their protective instincts kick in – and that translates into fear of danger. But the ad’s humour quickly produces high scores for ‘happiness’, some 85% above the ad norm when Mog is spun around on a ceiling fan in the kitchen. The Sainsbury’s story created a strong sense of ‘puzzlement’ and curiosity too – scoring 150% higher for these emotions than the John Lewis ad.

Tesco finest Range – Flirt: Puzzlement and disgust

The sight of an awkward young man trying to impress a confident older woman with his tastes in desserts, cheese and wine also brought mixed emotions. There was ‘puzzlement’ about whether the flirty son would be put in his place. The young man’s insistence on seeking the older woman’s attention created a sense of ‘disgust’. But ‘happiness’ peaks when the young man’s mother arrives to put him down by showing her son some boys-sized pyjamas.

John Lewis – Man on The Moon: Experience the full range of emotions

This is the ad everyone wanted to hate (low explicit appreciation scores), but secretly loved (sound emotional engagement scores). Featuring a young girl making contact with the Man on the Moon, the ad is unusual and resulted in higher ‘surprise’ scores (40% more than Sainsbury’s Mog the Cat). It also registered ‘disgust’, with viewers possibly rejecting the ad for its use of feelings of guilt and pathos towards the elderly. Man on the Moon also scored 22% more ‘sadness’ compared to Mog the Cat.

Asda – Because it’s Christmas: Cute Pug dog with antlers hits the high point

Asda’s ad performed poorly on ‘explicit appreciation’ and ‘emotional engagement’. Despite the upbeat soundtrack and visuals, viewers felt the ad lacked a clear narrative. But there were some high points with ‘happiness’ surging to 60% above the norm when the cute Pug dog with antlers appears.

Boots – Discover More: Peaks of fear and disgust sprinkled with some happiness

Viewers saw the Boots ad as lacking a narrative. There were small peaks of ‘fear’, possibly due to a sense of disorientation as the ad moved quickly from scene to scene. Viewers also registered spikes of ‘disgust’, probably due to the heavy emphasis on product placement and limited human interaction, which can leave audiences feeling manipulated. Near the end there are small peaks of ‘happiness’ as a woman finally makes eye contact and waves to viewers.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

Categories
Editor's pick film

Topshop, Kohl’s, Mulberry latest with holiday campaign releases

topshop_cara

The silly season is upon us, and with it a whole host of campaign releases referencing everything from the partying to the magical storytelling that Christmas so provides.

We’ve already had penguins at John Lewis and fairies at M&S, not to mention Sofia Coppola for Gap and Romeo Beckham over at Burberry.

Now there are elaborate gifts from family members at Mulberry trying to outdo one another (think puppies through to unicorns) alongside the hashtag #winchristmas. There’s also Cara Delevingne in another series of ads for Topshop, including a film of her frolicking in private member’s club Annabel’s in London, and needless to say a little touch of emotion is also on the cards, as from Kohl’s in the US with a very touching father/son tale.

Check them all out below:

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social media

Former Topshop, Burberry exec launches Tunepics – an image-based music sharing app

Tunepics on the iPhone

Will.i.am, Kate Bosworth and Jamie Oliver are among some of the first celebrity names to be using a new music discovery app called Tunepics, while brands including Paul Smith, Chloé and asos are also on board.

Ever wanted to share a song with your photograph to help sum up the mood of the scene more than a filter alone can do? Now you can. Tunepics – launched in the app store for the iPhone and iPad today – enables users to pair images with relevant songs thanks to the iTunes API.

“Over 500 million pictures are uploaded to the internet every day, and over 100 million songs are downloaded each week. Together, that’s dynamite,” says the brains behind the new social network, Justin Cooke, former CMO of Topshop, now founder and CEO of innovate7. His aim is to help create the “soundtrack to your life”.

The experience is an intuitive one: you upload an image, place a filter over the top, then search the 35 million songs in the iTunes library by keyword to add them to your shot. The result appears in a feed alongside those from the friends you opt to follow; each one auto-playing a 30-second preview of the track as you scroll over it, as well as offering a ‘download’ button to buy the full version.

Posts can also be ‘re-tuned’ to your own followers, and shared via Facebook and Twitter where they will appear as a ‘tunecard’. For the likes of Will.i.am, that of course makes the app an appealing proposition for its potential to help drive record sales. It also provides a revenue stream for innovate7 through affiliate sales from iTunes (there’s no advertising model planned on the platform for now otherwise).

Cooke is particularly excited for the opportunity that lies in music discovery, both for consumers using the app and for young, emerging talent to start gaining recognition in a new way. On that basis, it launches with a specially commissioned soundtrack from British band, Ellerby, called Colour Me In.

But the premise of the app, which was built by agency AKQA, otherwise goes further than just being about music sharing and discovery. The aim is to provide multisensory experiences that evoke an emotional response.

“When you hear a picture, it changes everything; it awakens your senses. We want [Tunepics] to be like a cinematic celebration of your life,” said Cooke. “Music is the most powerful way to express the things we see and feel; nothing else comes close.”

To that end, the emotional response that posts receive from followers is also fully visible. Each is accompanied by an ‘emotion wheel’ (the design of which also makes up the app’s logo). This features a spectrum of 16 colours users can choose from, representing different feelings such as happy, moved, jealous and heartbroken.

Said Cooke: “A like doesn’t tell a story on its own anymore. When [Nelson] Mandela passed away, we didn’t want to say that we liked it, but that it moved us. This is all about enabling an emotional experience.”

Which is why this app also makes sense, from the off, for brands. Beyond the initial celebrity appeal, there are also the likes of Paul Smith, All Saints, asos, Dazed and Airbnb already on board.

The expectation is that embedding music into their social content will help heighten the moments they want to talk about. An example post from Paul Smith featured a collection of paint pots and the Rolling Stones track Paint it Black. “His response was that he couldn’t imagine life without music. That’s so powerful, and so true,” Cooke explained. In fact, a similar quote from philosopher Nietzsche features on the Tunepics introductory video from the innovate7 team: “Without music, life would be a mistake.”

Clare Waight Keller, creative director of Chloé, said the choice to join Tunepics from day one was an instant decision after a two minute pitch. “I just loved the added layers of emotion, simply adding music to an image really brings it to life. It’s like a way to capture what was going through your head in that moment.”

She also appreciates the emotion wheel. “[It] will be really interesting. ‘Likes’ have almost become empty gestures now, it takes no real thought to ‘like’ a picture. But to take the time to select the feeling the image inspired in you, shows real engagement. It’s a great way for Chloé to connect with our audience,” she explained.

Brands will also begin to benefit from the data said emotion wheel collates. Mood charts are displayed beneath each tunepic showcasing people’s responses, which suggests valuable consumer insights could be gleaned should the numbers creep high enough. Unlike Instagram, it is also possible to add hyperlinks to every post, which will prove quite the draw for the likes of Paul Smith again, and all those others with e-commerce capabilities.

It may come as no surprise to learn that prior to his role at Topshop, Cooke spent six years helping to lead the charge at Burberry – a brand not only with a longstanding music initiative in Burberry Acoustic, but with an unquestionable focus on emotive content tied to measurable business results.

Topping it all off is the fact those aforementioned filters are based on the weather – another theme familiar to Burberry fans. Every photograph uploaded can be enhanced with true-to-life overlays of the snow, raindrops, sunshine or even a rainbow.

“I’ve always had a fascination with music, colour, images and the weather, and how they influence our mood and emotions. I want people to be able to share the depth behind the moments they experience and to articulate all the ones that they dream of having,” Cooke explained.

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digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Wren, Gucci, John Lewis, Lord & Taylor, Kenneth Cole, Sephora

A bit of a catch-up post today in light of several weeks of travel… here then all the latest stories to know about surrounding fashion and tech from the past fortnight or so:

 

  • “First Kiss” film (as above) goes viral with 63 million views – is ad for clothing label Wren [NY Times]
  • Gucci launches own Spotify music hub to promote short film ‘The Fringe’ [The Drum]
  • John Lewis looks to digital innovation as next big thing in retail with ‘JLab incubator’ [The Guardian]
  • Lord & Taylor now accepting bitcoin [CNBC]
  • Kenneth Cole challenges consumers to do good deeds and prove it via Google Glass [Creativity]
  • Sephora launches ‘Beauty Board’ social shopping platform [USA Today]
  • Bergdorf Goodman makes Instagram shots shoppable at SXSW with 52Grams [5th/58th]
  • Dolce & Gabbana crafts love story around perfume to appeal to consumer emotion [Luxury Daily
  • adidas launches gaming platform powered by social media starring Lionel Messi [Marketing Magazine]
  • Can Instagram save ageing teen retailer Aeropostale? [CNBC]
  • Which big brands are courting the maker movement, and why – from Levi’s to Home Depot  [AdWeek]
  • How beacon technology could change the way we shop [Fashionista]
  • On Instagram, a bazaar where you least expect it [Bits blog]
  • What Google’s wearable tech platform could mean for the fashion industry [Fashionista]
  • Smartphone payment system to be unveiled in UK [FT]
  • Alibaba ramping up efforts to sell US brands in China [WSJ]
  • What does WeChat’s new e-credit card mean for luxury? [JingDaily]
  • Op-Ed | Are camera phones killing fashion? [BoF]