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DKNY partners with Meitu for AR fragrance campaign

Meitu's BeautyPlus
Meitu’s BeautyPlus

DKNY has partnered with Meitu-owned BeautyPlus to launch an augmented reality (AR) campaign to promote its fragrance launch to the APAC market.

The partnership will leverage BeautyPlus’s AR capabilities and offer an exclusive DKNY filter to promote the new DKNY Stories fragrance, allowing users to snap selfies with a NYC-themed aesthetic. Launching this week, the digital campaign will kick off in Singapore before moving on to other major APAC markets, with each localized campaign lasting two weeks.

The branded filter celebrates New York City, which the brand’s DNA is so closely linked to, with a Midtown landscape that includes the Empire State Building in pink hues. The AR element superimposes sunglasses on the user’s face, accompanied by the #NYMADEME hashtag.

“It was such an exciting opportunity for us to integrate DKNY’s brand image into an exclusive filter for our app,” said Kathy Park, general manager of business development at the Meitu Korea office. “Now is the time to move beyond traditional ad formats and focus on ‘retail-tainment’ strategies that allow brands to communicate with potential customers more interactively through unique and engaging content.”

DKNY x BeautyPlus
DKNY x BeautyPlus

Using the filter and hashtag also gives users the chance to win online giveaways, while offline the campaign will take shape as pop-ups and product sample giveaways.

China-based Meitu is the world’s largest mobile beauty platform, with its combined apps generating over six billion photos and videos every month by over 454m users worldwide. Under the Meitu umbrella, the BeautyPlus app enables users to edit their selfies with extensive retouching tools. Other Meitu-owned apps include MakeUpPlus, Airbrush and MeiPai, all of which provide tools for users to take and edit better selfies. In February last year, Meitu promoted its portfolio in the Western market with a pop-up at London’s Soho neighbourhood during fashion week.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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business digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media Startups technology

What you missed: Rebecca Minkoff’s LA show, Ivanka Trump’s Nordstrom response, exec musical chairs

Rebecca Minkoff (right) with blogger Aimee Song at the designer's LA show
Rebecca Minkoff (right) with blogger Aimee Song at the designer’s LA show

Rebecca Minkoff kicked off the first of the LA fashion shows this season (Tommy Hilfiger, Tom Ford and Rachel Zoe to follow), with a shoppable collection as well as a series of connected handbags on offer. There was also entertainment galore, which gives Tommy something to try and outdo later this week.

Meanwhile, other news this week has focused heavily on the execs movements at various brands, including Stefan Larsson out as CEO at Ralph Lauren, Riccardo Tisci leaving Givenchy, rumoured headed to Versace, and Clare Waight Keller exiting Chloé. Also worth reading is detail on the John Lewis delivery trials straight to your car boot, insight on everything you need to know about the Snapchat IPO and Gap’s new 90s inspired campaign.


TOP STORIES
  • Rebecca Minkoff teams with Like to Know It to make LA show shoppable [WWD]
  • Ivanka Trump’s brand responds to Nordstrom [Racked]
  • John Lewis and Jaguar Land Rover are trialling shopping deliveries straight to your car [Forbes]
  • LVMH sets up new investment vehicle for emerging brands [Fashion United]

BUSINESS
  • Ralph Lauren CEO Stefan Larsson quits after dispute with founder over creative control [WSJ]
  • Riccardo Tisci is leaving Givenchy [BoF]
  • Clare Waight Keller exiting Chloé [BoF]
  • Hudson’s Bay reportedly in talks to acquire Macy’s [Retail Dive]
  • Farfetch sets share options scheme for all employees [WWD]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • 8 things marketers need to know about Snapchat’s IPO [AdAge]
  • How social media turned Hollywood’s beauty prep into marketing gold [BoF]
  • Step inside the YouTube-fuelled, teenaged extravaganza that is Beautycon [Wired]

MARKETING
  • Gap debuts ’90s-inspired ads starring the children of its former campaign stars [Fashionista]
  • Adidas tells the stories of female athletes’ struggles with ‘Unleash Your Creativity’ campaign [The Drum]
  • Luxury brands leverage custom emojis for peer-to-peer communication push [Luxury Daily]

RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • DKNY taps Farfetch to revitalise e-commerce strategy [Glossy]
  • How Lululemon and Adidas use RFID to set the stage for omnichannel [Apparel]

TECHNOLOGY
  • The promise of augmented reality [Economist]
  • Why retailers struggle to adopt mobile payments [Digiday]

START-UPS
  • Caraa CEO Aaron Luo: Startups have given up on good, old-fashioned (non-tech) product innovation [LeanLuxe]
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce social media Startups technology

What you missed: Virtual reality Window Wonderland, Amazon Go, free shipping and free returns

Google's Window Wonderland virtual reality tour
Google’s Window Wonderland virtual reality tour

Amazon, Google and Snapchat are the three top tech companies to look at for key stories over the past couple of weeks (and potentially the whole of 2016 in fact). From the launch of Amazon Go, which enables shoppers to just walk out of a shop while their phone handles payment, to the virtual reality “Window Wonderland” holiday tour Google has organised from a bevy of US stores – it’s all about more convenient as well as heightened experiential retail. Meanwhile, lots of brands are starting to experiment with Snapchat’s Spectacles too.

Also worth checking out from this past fortnight are a double-whammy of reports on free shipping and free returns, lots more about the uptake of chatbots, and a deep-dive on what the fashion world faces against the rise of extremism, populism and protectionism.


TOP STORIES
  • Thanks to Google, you can now take a VR tour of New York’s holiday window displays [Ad Week]
  • What Amazon Go means for the future of retail [AdAge]
  • Fashion world faces new normal [BoF]
  • Free shipping is a lie [Fast Company]
  • ‘Free’ returns aren’t free [The Atlantic]

BUSINESS

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Lush staff hit back at viral tweet with hilarious video [Stylist]
  • American Eagle Outfitters uses Snapchat Spectacles to film influencer ads in Hong Kong [The Drum]
  • Macy’s mixes shopping with social video to launch its holiday campaign [Ad Week]
  • Hype vs discovery: lessons from the Spectacles rollout [Loose Threads]
  • While we weren’t looking, Snapchat revolutionised social networks [NY Times]

MARKETING
  • Christmas ads deliver few real gifts for retailers, poll suggests [The Guardian]
  • How Target is taking control of programmatic [Digiday]
  • How chatbots will revolutionise holiday shopping [The Drum]
  • CoverGirl’s influencer chatbot is smart, funny and responsive [AdAge]

RETAIL
  • Experiential retail is key to Boohoo’s US expansion [Glossy]
  • Adidas just opened a new kind of store – and Nike should be terrified [Business Insider]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Has voice control finally started speaking our language? [The Guardian]
  • Rag & Bone takes on virtual reality with Google [WWD]
  • Is your T-shirt clean of slavery? Science may soon be able to tell [Reuters]
  • Technology can’t get rid of your cheap used clothes [Motherboard]

START-UPS
  • Amazon announces Alexa Accelerator to boost conversational commerce start-ups [Retail Dive]
Categories
Editor's pick social media

From Instagram to Snapchat: the best uses of social media this fashion week season

webinstance_Gigi Hadid in Twitter Halo 02

One month later, four cities down and with hundreds upon hundreds of different designer looks for spring/summer 2016 revealed, it’s no wonder so much of the fashion week season blurs together.

For the fashion savvy, there are of course the ever-notable collections (Wang’s last at Balenciaga, new colour and embellishment at Gucci, in my opinion everything at Hermès, plus the endless off-the-shoulder looks seen throughout each week), but there are also the marketing techniques used that helped some brands stand out more than others, regardless of the outfits they revealed.

Selfies at Dolce & Gabbana or wearable tech at Chanel and House of Holland aside, this season was all about a renewed focus on social media channels particularly. Innovative campaigns spanned 360-degree imagery on Twitter to a couple of uniquely creative approaches on Instagram and a highly polished example on Snapchat.

Head on over to Forbes for all the highlights from Misha Nonoo, DKNY, Burberry, Tommy Hilfiger and Hunter Original.

Categories
digital snippets film social media technology

Digital snippets: Dolce & Gabbana’s #selfies, Burberry’s Apple Music channel; NFC payments at House of Holland

Here’s a round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

dolce_selfie

  • Dolce & Gabbana models post selfies straight off the runway (as pictured) [Vogue]
  • Burberry becomes first fashion brand to launch Apple Music channel [BoF/Bloomberg]
  • It might seem like a gimmick, but here’s why Henry Holland’s NFC payment ring matters [Forbes]
  • Intel unveils RFID system for retailers, Levi Strauss pilots [RFID Journal]
  • DKNY gets personal for New York Fashion Week with Instagram Direct campaign [AdAge]
  • H&M releases film featuring David Beckham and American comedian Kevin Hart [Brand Republic]
  • Robots, holograms and wearables: A tech history of fashion week [Fashionista]
  • Snapchat and Uber: How outsiders got into NYFW events [Digiday]
  • The best of tech at London Fashion Week [Forbes]
  • New York Fashion Week’s social media winners and losers [Digiday]
  • Why fashion model Karlie Kloss launched her own YouTube channel [Co.Create]
  • Vogue goes viral [FT]
  • Google’s Eric Schmidt on how artificial intelligence could shape fashion trends [WWD]
  • Can ‘smart malls’ save China’s failing shopping centres from collapse? [The Guardian]
  • ‘A lot of guff is talked about personalisation’, says Ao.com boss John Roberts [Retail Week]
  • The invisible labour of fashion blogging [The Atlantic]
Categories
Comment Editor's pick social media

Brands be warned: #selfie fatigue

Oscars_selfie

Did you know, there were already 884 brands running #selfie competitions on Twitter by October 2013 (the year of the selfie), according to social media benchmarking company, Unmetric. Safe to say, that number has only risen since, as everyone from French Connection to Calvin Klein, not to mention Marc Jacobs and DKNY (and that’s in the fashion industry alone) have likewise jumped on the bandwagon.

In theory it’s a quick win: stick a contest up on social that taps into this hashtag phenomenon, sit back and wait to see your consumer engagement sky rocket.

Or so you hope.

In practice, if everyone else is calling for that content too, it doesn’t take long before standing out from the noise is as hard as it’s ever been. Selfie fatigue, or indeed hashtag fatigue is undoubtedly on its way (as so eloquently demonstrated by the lovely Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake). To really find success in this space, what that means is brands need to dedicate as much of a focus to creativity as they would with any other marketing activity.

Enter Yourselfieideaisnotoriginal.tumblr.com, a brilliantly-captioned warning to all on the pits of branded selfie contests. A couple of favourites selected below. Enjoy…

selfie selfie selfie

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digital snippets e-commerce film mobile social media technology

Digital snippets: Nike, Burberry, Selfridges, DKNY, John Lewis, Burt’s Bees

It was perhaps Nike that was the buzziest of brands over the past couple of weeks, if you take into consideration both the successful launch of its unofficial World Cup campaign, Winner Stays (as above), and the rumoured shift in strategy for its FuelBand wearable device. That latter news reported the brand is laying off 70-80% of the fitness tracker’s hardware team in a bid to focus on software and the NikeFuel metric instead. A further interview with Nike President Mark Parker added fuel to the fire on a big partnership with Apple.

Burberry meanwhile was another brand with various stories to follow. It opened its new Shanghai store to much theatrical, multimedia fanfare; pushed yet another social tie-in via WeChat; launched an online store on Alibaba’s Tmall; and was announced as one of the first brands to advertise using Instagram video. And if that wasn’t enough, Angela Ahrendts just made that move officially over to Apple. “Did you notice?” asked the FT.

Safe to say, some other companies were up to things too. Here are the best of the fashion and tech stories not to be missed…

  • Selfridges launches biggest ever beauty campaign with Google+ partnership [Campaign]
  • DKNY shoppers go product hunting with Awear Solutions chips [FierceRetailIT]
  • John Lewis looks back on British history in TV spot to mark 150 years [Campaign]
  • Burt’s Bees creates promotional messages via appointments in digital calendars [NY Times]
  • What can fashion-tech companies learn from Instagram’s success? Co-founder and CEO Kevin Systrom shares his start-up secrets [BoF]
  • Instagram is brands’ best bet for consumer engagement… but not for long [Fashionista]
  • ‘Brand tagging’ mobile apps: China’s next selfie sensation [Jing Daily]
  • Fashion retailers eye up image-recognition apps for smartphones [The Guardian]
  • Microsoft to push into fashion space “like never before” as it boosts commitment to UK start-up community and unveils ASOS as partner [The Drum]
  • Why online retailers like Bonobos, Boden, Athleta mail so many catalogs [WSJ]
  • Crowdemand is like Kickstarter for fashion designers [Mashable]
  • Like a dating site for fashion, PopInShop plays matchmaker for brands and boutiques [Fashionista]
  • The golden era of ‘fashion blogging’ is over [The Cut]
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce social media technology

Digital snippets: DKNY, Chanel, Mary Meeker, Karl Lagerfeld, Jaeger, Lululemon

A round-up of recent stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital:

DKNY_timessquare

  • DKNY campaign combines art with augmented reality (as pictured) [Mashable]
  • Mary Meeker’s annual internet trends report highlights mobile momentum, wearables and digital China [BOF]
  • Karl Lagerfeld opens concept store complete with social media dressing rooms and wearable cash registers [PSFK]
  • Jaeger’s relaunched e-commerce site deconstructed [Econsultancy]
  • Lululemon uses digital to build local communities [L2 Think Tank]
  • Zegna group Tumblr bows [WWD]
  • Sears turning old department stores into data centres [Fast Company]
  • China e-commerce: Why Tmall works [BoF]
  • Six brands that have been busy experimenting with Google Hangouts, including Asos, Glamour [Econsultancy]
Categories
film mobile social media

All the winners from the 2013 Fashion 2.0 Awards

Fashion 2.0 Awards host Robert Verdi; Style Coalition founder and CEO Yuli Ziv; Simon Doonan, Barneys New York creative ambassador at large - pic by Patrick McMullan

Marc Jacobs took the top innovator award at Style Coalition’s fourth annual Fashion 2.0 Awards in New York last night, an event dedicated to celebrating the best in communications strategies across digital media platforms.

Voted for by the public, the event also saw Jacobs taking the best Facebook title. Saks Fifth Avenue won two awards too: best blog by a fashion brand, and best website.

DKNY was named best Twitter for the fourth year in a row, while the Fashion 2.0 visionary award was presented to Rent the Runway founders Jennifer Hyman and Jenny Fleiss in acknowledgment of their “achievements in disrupting the retail industry and democratizing luxury fashion”.

Here’s the full list:

Pic courtesy of Patrick McMullan

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Comment social media technology

#SXSW Interactive in prep: a fashionable playing ground for 2013

FashionBrainBar_SXSW_main

If there was one thing I learnt from SXSW last year, it was that I absolutely had to go again in 2013. On top of the fact it’s the place to hear industry leaders  give expert insights, the place to learn about new innovations and source fresh inspirations, and the place where trends and directions for the tech world break… it’s also a breeding ground for incredible networking.

For anyone working within the fashion-meets-digital space, this seems especially the case this year, with more attendees headed to Austin from our industry than ever, as well as a host of relevant events to go with it.

Fashion’s Collective is hosting one of them, known as the Fashion Brain Bar on Monday, March 11 (as pictured above). It’s aim is to provide a bit of respite from the insanity of the festival, but also a space for everyone to meet the people they need to meet and have “the conversations that will play a key role in the advancements we’ll see over the next few years”.

Industry experts on hand will include Raman Kia, executive director of integrated strategy at Condé Nast through to Dave Gilboa, founder of Warby Parker. The full list can be seen here, as well as a space to submit questions to them in advance.

Another fringe event planned is called The Neighborhood. Created by AvecMode and 2nd Street District, it’s a move on from the Style X event of previous years, which brought a fashion focus (complete with runway shows) to Austin nearer the end of the festival. This time plans are in place from March 11 – 14 with a bit more of an industry edge. There are pop-up stores still, but also Q&A sessions with pros from the likes of Neiman Marcus, Michael Kors, Lyst, Refinery29 and more, as well as highlight interviews with menswear designers John Varvatos and Billy Reid.

The main SXSW schedule does of course feature a number of fashion-specific events too, including this one with Nina Garcia focused on the democratisation of high fashion. And this one featuring New York’s “digital it-crowd” in Aliza Licht, Cannon Hodge, Erika Bearman and John Jannuzzi (that’d be DKNY, Bergdorf Goodman, Oscar de la Renta and Lucky Magazine).

Fashion’s Collective has also published a survival guide to the whole five days, including must-attend events (lots of them non-fashion which I would highly recommend, there’s nothing like being inspired from outside your normal remit), as well as a handful of food and drink recommendations (indispensable).

I also love this guide from Andrew Hyde, called Ditch the Marketers, Find the Makers, it sums up the rest of the experience beautifully (be friendly to everyone, sit down when you can, put down your tech and look at people – yes really).

On that note mind you, if you’re going, drop me a line over Twitter. Assuming I can connect, I’d love to meet you.